International community

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The international community is a phrase used in international relations to refer to a broad group of people and governments of the world. The term is typically used to imply the existence of a common point of view towards such matters as specific issues of human rights. Activists, politicians, and commentators often use the term in calling for action to be taken; e.g., action against what is in their opinion political repression in a target country.

The term is commonly used to imply consensus for a point of view on a disputed issue; e.g., to enhance the credibility of a majority vote in the United Nations General Assembly.

Interpretations[edit]

Noam Chomsky has noted the use of the term to refer to the United States and its client states and allies in the media of those states.[1][2][3] The scholar and academic Martin Jacques says: "We all know what is meant by the term 'international community', don't we? It's the west, of course, nothing more, nothing less. Using the term 'international community' is a way of dignifying the west, of globalising it, of making it sound more respectable, more neutral and high-faluting."[4]

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