International finance

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For the academic journal or financial magazine, see International Finance (journal) and Global Finance (magazine).

International finance (also referred to as international monetary economics or international macroeconomics) is the branch of financial economics broadly concerned with monetary and macroeconomic interrelations between two or more countries.[1][2] International finance examines the dynamics of the global financial system, international monetary systems, balance of payments, exchange rates, foreign direct investment, and how these topics relate to international trade.[1][2][3]

Sometimes referred to as multinational finance, international finance is additionally concerned with matters of international financial management. Investors and multinational corporations must assess and manage international risks such as political risk and foreign exchange risk, including transaction exposure, economic exposure, and translation exposure.[4][5]

Some examples of key concepts within international finance are the Mundell–Fleming model, the optimum currency area theory, purchasing power parity, interest rate parity, and the international Fisher effect. Whereas the study of international trade makes use of mostly microeconomic concepts, international finance research investigates predominantly macroeconomic concepts.

What's Special about International Finance? Although we may be convinced of the importance of studying international finance, we still have to ask ourselves, what's special about international finance? Put another way, how is international finance different from purely domestic finance ( if such a thing exists)? Three major dimensions set international finance apart from domestic finance. They are:

  1. Foreign exchange and political risks.
  2. Market imperfection.
  3. Expanded opportunity set.

These major dimensions of international finance largely stem from the fact that sovereign nations have the right and power to issue currencies, formulate their own economic policies, impose taxes, and regulate movement of people, goods, and capital across their borders.[6]

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Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ a b Gandolfo, Giancarlo (2002). International Finance and Open-Economy Macroeconomics. Berlin, Germany: Springer. ISBN 978-3-540-43459-7. 
  2. ^ a b Pilbeam, Keith (2006). International Finance, 3rd Edition. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan. ISBN 978-1-4039-4837-3. 
  3. ^ Feenstra, Robert C.; Taylor, Alan M. (2008). International Macroeconomics. New York, NY: Worth Publishers. ISBN 978-1-4292-0691-4. 
  4. ^ Madura, Jeff (2007). International Financial Management: Abridged 8th Edition. Mason, OH: Thomson South-Western. ISBN 0-324-36563-2. 
  5. ^ Eun, Cheol S.; Resnick, Bruce G. (2011). International Financial Management, 6th Edition. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill/Irwin. ISBN 978-0-07-803465-7. 
  6. ^ Eun, Cheol S.; Resnick, Bruce G. (2015). International Financial Management, 7th Edition. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill/Irwin. ISBN 978-0-07-786160-5. 

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