Internet and Technology Law Desk Reference

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Internet and Technology Law Desk Reference
Internet and Technology Law Desk Reference.jpeg
Book cover
Author Michael Dennis Scott
Country United States
Language English
Subject Information technology law
Genre Law
Publisher Aspen Publishers
Publication date
1999
Pages 1106
ISBN 0-7355-8309-9
OCLC 41548365

Internet and Technology Law Desk Reference is a non-fiction book about information technology law, written by Michael Dennis Scott. The book uses wording from legal cases to define information technology jargon, and gives citations to individual lawsuits. Scott received his B.S. degree from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and graduated with a J.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles. He has taught as a law professor at Southwestern Law School. The book was published by Aspen Law and Business in 1999. Multiple subsequent editions were published under the imprint Aspen Publishers. Internet and Technology Law Desk Reference was recommended by the Cyberlaw Research Resources Guide at the James E. Rogers College of Law, and has been used as a reference in law journals including University of Pennsylvania Journal of International Economic Law, and Berkeley Technology Law Journal.

Author[edit]

Michael D. Scott (2009)

Michael Dennis Scott is a lawyer; in 1999 he resided in Los Angeles.[1] Scott graduated in 1967 from Massachusetts Institute of Technology with a bachelor of science degree in mathematics and computer science.[2][3] He received his J.D. degree in 1974 from the University of California, Los Angeles.[3] He is a member of the United States Patent Bar and the California State Bar.[3] He was employed by Perkins Coie LLP in 1999.[4] Comtex News Network described Scott in 1999 as, "a veteran Internet law expert".[4] He taught as a professor in the subject of legal studies at Southwestern Law School.[3][5] He is the author of legal books including Scott on Outsourcing Law & Practice, Scott on Multimedia Law, Intellectual Property Licensing Law Desk Reference, and Telecommunications Law Desk Reference.[2][5] Scott serves as editor-in-chief of newsletters E-Commerce Law Report and The Cyberspace Lawyer.[3][5] He maintains a law-related blog at www.singularitylaw.com.[5] Scott was a cofounder of the World Computer Law Congress, and a director of the Computer Law Association.[2]

Contents[edit]

Internet and Technology Law Desk Reference is a reference work on the subject of law.[6] The reference utilizes written opinions from judges in lawsuits and court-approved wording to provide definitions for information technology related legal jargon.[6] Entries are organized in alphabetical order, with citations given to individual lawsuits.[7]

Publication history[edit]

Internet and Technology Law Desk Reference was published in 1999 by Aspen Law and Business.[8][9] Subsequent editions were released by Aspen Law and Business in 2001,[10] 2002,[11] and 2003.[12] Under the imprint Aspen Publishers, the book was released in later editions in 2004,[13] 2005,[14] 2007,[15] and 2009.[16]

Reception[edit]

Shaun Esposito of the James E. Rogers College of Law recommended the reference work in his Cyberlaw Research Resources Guide, and wrote, "It could be useful both in defining unfamiliar terms and in starting research on any topic listed in the work."[7] In 2000, board members of the CBA Journal Lawrence M. Friedman and John Levin used the book to compile a self-assessment tool for readers to determine their proficiency with technology and internet terminology.[17] The University of Chicago Legal Forum described Internet and Technology Law Desk Reference as a publication involved in "compiling internet definitions used in court opinions".[18] The book has been utilized as a reference in law journals including University of Pennsylvania Journal of International Economic Law,[19] Notre Dame Law Review,[20] Berkeley Technology Law Journal,[21] and Boston College Law Review.[22]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pfister, Bonnie; Don Sheron (December 29, 1999). "Not all had merry Christmas; Late shipments riled some online shoppers". San Antonio Express-News. p. 01C. 
  2. ^ a b c Epstein, Michael A.; Frank L. Politano (2002). Drafting License Agreements. Aspen Law & Business Publishers. p. xxviii. ISBN 0-7355-3488-8. 
  3. ^ a b c d e Southwestern Law School (2010). "Michael D. Scott". Faculty Profile. www.swlaw.edu. Retrieved 2010-12-20. 
  4. ^ a b "Enormous Use of Online Shopping Could Lead to Potential Lawsuits, According to Perkins Coie Internet Law Experts". Comtex News Network. Sinocast. December 27, 1999. 
  5. ^ a b c d Scott, Michael D. (2006). Scott on Information Technology Law. Aspen Publishers. p. v. ISBN 0-7355-6524-4. 
  6. ^ a b "Internet and Technology Law Desk Reference". The Federal Lawyer. Arlington, Virginia: Federal Bar Association. 46. 1999. 
  7. ^ a b Esposito, Shaun (2010). "Selected Print Materials". Cyberlaw Research Resources Guide. James E. Rogers College of Law. Retrieved 2010-12-20. 
  8. ^ Online Computer Library Center (2010). "Internet and Technology Law Desk Reference". WorldCat. www.worldcat.org; OCLC 632387609. Retrieved 2010-12-20.  External link in |publisher= (help)
  9. ^ Online Computer Library Center (2010). "Internet and Technology Law Desk Reference". WorldCat. www.worldcat.org; OCLC 41548365. Retrieved 2010-12-20.  External link in |publisher= (help)
  10. ^ Online Computer Library Center (2010). "Internet and Technology Law Desk Reference". WorldCat. www.worldcat.org; OCLC 45342846. Retrieved 2010-12-20.  External link in |publisher= (help)
  11. ^ Online Computer Library Center (2010). "Internet and Technology Law Desk Reference". WorldCat. www.worldcat.org; OCLC 48649753. Retrieved 2010-12-20.  External link in |publisher= (help)
  12. ^ Online Computer Library Center (2010). "Internet and Technology Law Desk Reference". WorldCat. www.worldcat.org; OCLC 50742841. Retrieved 2010-12-20.  External link in |publisher= (help)
  13. ^ Online Computer Library Center (2010). "Internet and Technology Law Desk Reference". WorldCat. www.worldcat.org; OCLC 52413077. Retrieved 2010-12-20.  External link in |publisher= (help)
  14. ^ Online Computer Library Center (2010). "Internet and Technology Law Desk Reference". WorldCat. www.worldcat.org; OCLC 62199946. Retrieved 2010-12-20.  External link in |publisher= (help)
  15. ^ Online Computer Library Center (2010). "Internet and Technology Law Desk Reference". WorldCat. www.worldcat.org; OCLC 138552255. Retrieved 2010-12-20.  External link in |publisher= (help)
  16. ^ Scott, Michael D. (2009). Internet and Technology Law Desk Reference. Aspen Publishers (Wolters Kluwer Law & Business). ISBN 0-7355-8309-9. 
  17. ^ Hyman, Michael B. (April 2000). "Department: Editor's Briefcase". CBA Record. Chicago Bar Association. 14 (6). 
  18. ^ Thompson, Tara E. (2002). "Locating Discrimination: Interactive Web Sites as Public Accommodations under Title II of the Civil Rights Act". The University of Chicago Legal Forum. The University of Chicago (409). 
  19. ^ Halpern, Marcelo; Ajay K. Mehrotra (Fall 2000). "From International Treaties to Internet Norms: The Evolution of International Trademark Disputes in the Internet Age". University of Pennsylvania Journal of International Economic Law. University of Pennsylvania. 21 (523). 
  20. ^ Schultz, Christian David Hammel (June 2001). "Unrestricted Federal Agent: 'Carnivore' and the Need to Revise the Pen Register Statute". Notre Dame Law Review. University of Notre Dame. 76 (1215). 
  21. ^ Rustad, Michael L.; Thomas H. Koenig (Fall 2005). "The Tort of Negligent Enablement of Cybercrime". Berkeley Technology Law Journal. 20 (1553). 
  22. ^ Dube, Michael R. (May 2001). "Motive and Opportunity Test Survives Congressional Death Knell in Private Securities Litigation Reform Act". Boston College Law Review. Boston College Law School. 42 (619). 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]