Interstate 675 (Georgia)

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Interstate 675 marker

Interstate 675
Terrell Starr Parkway
I-675 highlighted in red
Route information
Maintained by GDOT
Length11.04 mi[3][4] (17.77 km)
Existed1987[1][2]–present
Major junctions
South end I-75 in Stockbridge
 
North end I-285 near Forest Park
Location
CountiesHenry, Clayton, DeKalb
Highway system
  • Georgia State Routes
I-575I-985
SR 411Georgia 413.svgSR 415

Interstate 675 (I-675) is an 11.04-mile-long (17.77 km) auxiliary Interstate Highway in the southeast part of the Atlanta metropolitan area. It travels from I-75 in Stockbridge in the south to I-285 in the north. I-675 is also designated as the Terrell Starr Parkway and also has the unsigned internal state route designation of State Route 413 (SR 413).

Route description[edit]

Beginning at its southern terminus with Interstate 75, Interstate 675 is a four lane highway with a grassy median and frequently with cable barriers. Between Ellenwood Road/Forest Parkway and the route's northern terminus at Interstate 285 and Moreland Avenue, the freeway expands with three lanes in each direction.

The southern end of Interstate 675 includes reversible High occupancy/toll and express toll lanes (ETLs) built within the median, the South Metro Express Lanes, which opened January 28, 2017.[5]

History[edit]

At one time, I-675 was to connect with I-485/SR 400 east of downtown Atlanta. However, this would have destroyed many neighborhoods including Inman Park. Because it was thought that the road was unnecessary due to three other existing north–south Interstates across and around the city, and due to community opposition, the highway was stopped by then-governor of Georgia Jimmy Carter in 1975. After I-485 was cancelled, it was then planned to end at once proposed I-420 near Gresham Park.[6] However, in 1986, I-420 was cancelled for the same reason. So, its northern terminus is at I-285 instead. What would have been the interchange between this road and I-485 is now the location of the Jimmy Carter Library and Museum.

In 1982, the entire length of the highway was under construction.[7][8] In 1987, it was open to traffic.[1][2]

Future[edit]

As of 2010, the idea of connecting I-675 and SR 400 has been resurrected, being put on an official list of GDOT priorities. This would extend I-675 north to I-20 with a surface road, then go underground with a road tunnel. This would displace some neighborhoods and industrial areas to the south. The tunnel would protect other areas north of I-20, however there would still be ventilation buildings.[citation needed]

Exit list[edit]

CountyLocationmikmExitDestinationsNotes
HenryStockbridge0.000.00 I-75 south (SR 401) – Macon, TampaSouthern terminus; southbound exit and northbound entrance; I-75 exit 227
Clayton0.610.981 SR 138 to I-75 north – Stockbridge, Jonesboro
Rex2.403.862 US 23 / SR 42 – Stockbridge
Forest Park5.058.135Ellenwood Road / Forest Parkway to SR 331 west
Conley6.6510.707Anvil Block Road – Fort Gillem
DeKalb11.0417.7711 I-285 (Atlanta Bypass / SR 407) to US 23 / SR 42 (Moreland Avenue) – Greenville, Atlanta International AirportNorthern terminus; northbound exit and southbound entrance; I-285 exit 52
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Georgia Department of Transportation (1987). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1987–1988 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved December 27, 2016.
  2. ^ a b Georgia Department of Transportation (1988). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1988–1989 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved December 27, 2016.
  3. ^ "Route Log – Auxiliary Routes of the Eisenhower National System Of Interstate and Defense Highways – Table 2". Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved 5 October 2014.
  4. ^ Google (November 27, 2012). "Overview map of I-675" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved November 27, 2012.
  5. ^ "New I-75 express lanes to speed up traffic — at a price". The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. By David Wickert and Tammy Joyner. Retrieved June 21, 2017.
  6. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1982). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved July 10, 2011.
  7. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1982). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved December 27, 2016.
  8. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1983). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1983–1984 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved December 27, 2016.

External links[edit]

Route map:

KML is from Wikidata