Interstate 675 (Georgia)

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Interstate 675 marker

Interstate 675
Terrell Starr Parkway
Route information
Maintained by Georgia DOT
Length: 11.04 mi[3][4] (17.77 km)
Existed: 1987[1][2] – present
Major junctions
South end: I‑75 in Stockbridge
  SR 138 near Stockbridge
US 23 / SR 42 near Stockbridge
North end: I‑285 near Forest Park
Location
Counties: Henry, Clayton, DeKalb
Highway system
  • Georgia State Routes
I‑575 I‑985
SR 411 Georgia 413.svg SR 415

Interstate 675 (I-675) is an auxiliary interstate highway in the southeast part of the Atlanta metropolitan area. It is 11.04 miles (17.77 km) in length, running from I-75 in Stockbridge in the south to I-285 in the north. I-675 is also designated as the Terrell Starr Parkway and also has the unsigned internal state route designation of State Route 413 (SR 413).

Route description[edit]

Beginning at its southern terminus with Interstate 75, Interstate 675 is a four lane highway with a grassy median and frequently with cable barriers. Between Ellenwood Road/Forest Parkway and the route's northern terminus at Interstate 285 and Moreland Avenue, the freeway expands with three lanes in each direction.

History[edit]

At one time, I-675 was to connect with SR 400/I-485 east of downtown Atlanta. However, this would have destroyed many neighborhoods including Inman Park. Because it was thought that the road was unnecessary due to three other existing north/south interstates across and around the city, and due to community opposition, the road was stopped by then-governor of Georgia Jimmy Carter in 1975. After I-485 was cancelled, it was then planned to end at once proposed I-420 near Gresham Park.[5] Though in 1986, I-420 was cancelled for the same reason, so it's northern terminus is at I-285 instead. What would have been the interchange between this road and I-485 is now the location of the Jimmy Carter Library and Museum.

In 1982, the entire length of the highway was under construction.[6][7] In 1987, it was open to traffic.[1][2]

Future[edit]

As of 2010, the idea of connecting I-675 and SR 400 has been resurrected, being put on an official list of GDOT priorities. This would extend I-675 north to I-20 with a surface road, then go underground with a road tunnel. This would displace some neighborhoods and industrial areas to the south. The tunnel would protect other areas north of I-20, however there would still be ventilation buildings.[citation needed]

The southern end of Interstate 675 is slated to be expanded to include reversible High occupancy/toll and express toll lanes (ETLs) built within the grassy median. Construction will begin in October 2014.[8]

Exit list[edit]

County Location mi km Exit Destinations Notes
Henry Stockbridge 0.00 0.00 I‑75 south – Macon, Tampa I-75 north exit 227; southbound exit & northbound entrance; southern terminus.
Clayton 0.61 0.98 1 SR 138 to I‑75 north – Stockbridge, Jonesboro
Rex 2.40 3.86 2 US 23 / SR 42 – Stockbridge
Forest Park 5.05 8.13 5 Ellenwood Road, Forest Parkway to State Route 331 west
Conley 6.65 10.70 7 Anvilblock Road – Fort Gillem
DeKalb 11.04 17.77 11 I‑285 – Greenville, Atlanta International Airport, to Moreland Avenue (US 23, SR 42) I-285 exit 52; northbound exit & southbound entrance; northern terminus.
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Georgia Department of Transportation (1987). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1987–88 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved December 27, 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Georgia Department of Transportation (1988). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1988–89 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved December 27, 2016. 
  3. ^ "Route Log - Auxiliary Routes of the Eisenhower National System Of Interstate and Defense Highways - Table 2". Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved 5 October 2014. 
  4. ^ Google (November 27, 2012). "Route of Interstate 675" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved November 27, 2012. 
  5. ^ Georgia State Highway System (PDF) (Map). Cartography by GSHD. Georgia State Highway Department. January 1, 1982. Retrieved July 10, 2011. 
  6. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1981). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1981–1982 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved December 27, 2016. 
  7. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1983). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1983–84 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved December 27, 2016. 
  8. ^ "I75 Express Lanes". Retrieved 30 September 2014. 

External links[edit]

Route map: Bing / Google

KML is from Wikidata