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Business routes of Interstate 96

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Interstate 96 marker

Interstate 96
Highway system

There have been six business routes of Interstate 96 (I-96) in the US state of Michigan. There are two business loops designated Business Loop Interstate 96 (BL I-96): one through Lansing and one through Howell. Both follow the old route of US Highway 16 (US 16), with appropriate connections to I-96. There are three former business spurs that were designated Business Spur Interstate 96 (BS I-96). One connected to the carferry docks in Muskegon, running concurrently with part of Business US 31 (Bus. US 31) along former US 16, but it has been eliminated. The second spur ran into downtown Portland until it was decommissioned in 2007. Two routes in the Detroit area—a loop through Farmington and a spur into Detroit—both using Grand River Avenue, and meeting at the temporary end of I-96 near Purdue Avenue, were eliminated when I-96 was moved to the completed Jeffries Freeway in 1977. These Detroit-area business routes are still state-maintained as unsigned highways.

Muskegon[edit]

Business Spur Interstate 96
Location: Muskegon
Length: 6.160 mi[3] (9.914 km)
Existed: 1963[4][5]–1984[1][2]

Business Spur Interstate 96 (BS I-96) was a business spur of I-96 in the Muskegon area. It was formerly the route of US 16 from the carferry docks in Muskegon to the end of I-96 in Norton Shores. The spur ran concurrently with M-46 southeasterly from the docks along Mart Street and Sixth Street. At the intersections with the one-way pairing of Webster Avenue (southbound) and Muskegon Avenue (northbound) in downtown Muskegon, BS I-96 separated from M-46 and turned southward to follow Bus. US 31 while M-46 turned northward along Bus. US 31. From there, BS I-96/Bus. US 31 ran southwesterly along the one-way pair for a few blocks before the two directions of traffic merged onto the north–south section of Seaway Drive southwest of downtown. The business route then ran due south along Seaway Drive, exiting Muskegon at Sherman Drive and crossing onto a section of the Norton Shores–Muskegon Heights city line. South of Norton Avenue, Seaway Drive turned eastward along the southern edge of Muskegon Heights. BS I-96/Bus. US 31 ran along the northern edge of Mona Lake and crossed the Black Creek in Norton Shores. Southwest of the lake, the business route came to an end at the interchange along US 31 that marked the western starting point of I-96.[1][6]

SS Milwaukee Clipper docked in Muskegon

When the state highway system was first signposted in 1919,[7] the east–west highway from Grand Haven through Nunica to Detroit was assigned the M-16 designation; there was no state highway between Muskegon and Nunica,[8] This was redesignated US 16 in 1926.[9] By 1934, a state highway numbered M-126 was designated between Muskegon and Nunica,[10] and this was replaced by a rerouted US 16 in 1940.[11][12] On December 12, 1962, the freeway that is now I-96 was initially completed across the state of Michigan from Muskegon to the Detroit area.[13] After this completion, US 16 was decommissioned.[14] West of Grand Rapids, the freeway was originally I-196, and the route of former US 16 past the end of the freeway to the ferry dock was numbered BS I-196.[4] The freeway was redesignated I-96 on October 21, 1963,[15] and BS I-196 became BS I-96 thereafter.[4][5] In 1970, the SS Milwaukee Clipper across Lake Michigan ceased to run.[16] In 1984, the section of BS I-96/M-46 between the ferry docks and Bus. US 31 was turned over to local control. The BS I-96 designation was decommissioned and removed from its concurrency with Bus. US 31, and M-46 was truncated to end at its other junction with Bus. US 31.[1][2]

Major intersections
The entire highway was in Muskegon County.

Location mi[3] km Destinations Notes
Muskegon 0.000 0.000 Carferry docks
M-46 east
Carferries connected to Milwaukee, Wisconsin; western terminus of M-46
1.100 1.770
Bus. US 31 north / M-46 east
Northern end of Bus. US 31 concurrency; eastern end of M-46 concurrency
Norton Shores 6.160 9.914 I-96 – Grand Rapids
US 31 – Holland, Ludington

Bus. US 31 north
Southern end of Bus. US 31 concurrency; western terminus of I-96
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Portland[edit]

Business Spur Interstate 96
Location: Portland
Length: 1.289 mi[3] (2.074 km)
Existed: September 18, 1978[18]–October 31, 2007[17]

Business Spur Interstate 96 (BS I-96) was a business spur of I-96 through the city of Portland. The western terminus was at the corner of Grand River Avenue and Kent Street in downtown Portland. From there the highway followed Grand River Avenue eastward through downtown and past businesses roughly parallel to the Looking Glass River. East of downtown, the spur turned southeasterly past another commercial area. The highway's eastern terminus was at exit 77 south of the city.[19][20]

When the state highway system was first signposted in 1919,[7] the east–west highway across the Lower Peninsula through Portland to Detroit was assigned the M-16 designation,[8] This was redesignated US 16 in 1926.[9] The section of US 16 through Portland was decommissioned on March 7, 1960.[18] It would remain under local control until the first quarter-mile (0.4 km) section was transferred to state control on September 18, 1978.[18] The route was first marked on state highway maps in 1982 along the full mile and a quarter (2.0 km).[21] It was transferred back to local control on October 31, 2007.[17]

Major intersections
The entire highway was in Portland, Ionia County.

mi[3] km Destinations Notes
0.000 0.000 Grand River Avenue west
Kent Street
Roadway continued west as Grand River Avenue
1.289 2.074 I-96 – Grand Rapids, Lansing Exit 77 on I-96
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Lansing[edit]

Business Loop Interstate 96
Location: Lansing
Length: 10.259 mi[3] (16.510 km)
Existed: 1962[22][23]–present

Business Loop Interstate 96 (BL I-96) is a business loop of I-96 through the city of Lansing. The western terminus is at I-96's exit 90 northwest of Lansing in Watertown Township in Clinton County near the I-96/I-69 junction. From there, it follows Grand River Avenue under I-96. East of I-96, BL I-96 intersects Frances Road, which provides access to I-69, and then passes under I-69. Grand River Avenue is three lanes, one in each direction divided by a central turn lane, and runs past light industrial areas, crossing into Lansing and Eaton County near the Capital Region International Airport. The area around the airport is commercial, but east of there North Grand River Avenue runs through residential neighborhoods. Near the intersection with Marin Luther King Jr Boulevard, the business loop runs along the Grand River and then BL I-96 turns eastward on North Street to an interchange with Cedar and Larch streets. The business loop turns and splits onto the one-way pairing of the two-lane Cedar (southbound) and Larch (northbound). As it runs southward, the highway runs parallel to the Grand River through eastern downtown Lansing. At Oakland Avenue (westbound) and Saginaw Avenue (eastbound), BL I-96 intersects the two one-way streets that carry BL I-69.[24][25]

Near Cooley Law School Stadium at the intersection with Michigan Avenue, BL I-96 meets the Capitol Loop, Lansing's third business loop. The two highways run concurrently south of Michigan Avenue as Cedar Street angles southeasterly. The two directions of BL I-96 merge at an interchange with I-496 that also marks the end of the Capitol Loop. South of this interchange, Cedar Street continues as a five-lane street through a commercial corridor on the south side of Lansing. The business loop crosses the Red Cedar River three blocks south of the I-496 interchange. On either side of the business loop, the adjacent neighborhoods are residential in character. South of an intersection with Jolly Road, Cedar Street starts angling southeasterly. BL I-96 ends at an indirect interchange with I-96 near the Edgewood Town Center.[24][25]

When the state highway system was first signposted in 1919,[7] the east–west highway across the Lower Peninsula through Lansing to Detroit was assigned the M-16 designation.[8] M-16 was rerouted in the Lansing area in 1925, running along Grand River Avenue from Grand Ledge to East Lansing. The former routing through Downtown Lansing on Michigan Avenue became part of M-39.[26][27] This was redesignated US 16 in 1926.[9] With the completion of I-96 in between Lansing and Brighton, US 16 was decommissioned in Michigan in 1962. The former routing of US 16 on the north side of Lansing was redesignated as BL I-96. Through downtown, it followed the former US 27 on Larch Street. There, BL I-96 joined US 27 along a one-way pairing of Larch and Cedar streets. Where US 27 turned to join M-78 at Main Street, BL I-96 continued along US 127 along Cedar Street to terminate at I-96 south of the city at exit 104.[22][23] In 1963, BL I-96 was rerouted onto the first portion of the I-496 freeway to be constructed southeast of the city.[23][28] This rerouting would last until 1966 when it was transferred back to the original routing with the completion of the US 127 freeway between Lansing and Mason. BL I-96 was rerouted along M-43/Bus. M-78 to the I-496/M-78 freeway and back to I-96 at exit 106. Once the US 127 freeway was completed, BL I-96 was rerouted back along the former US 127 routing to I-96.[29][30]

Major intersections

County Location mi[3] km Destinations Notes
Clinton Watertown Township 0.000 0.000 I-96 – Grand Rapids, Detroit Exit 90 on I-96
Ingham Lansing 3.552–
3.784
5.716–
6.090
North Street east
Cedar Street north
Interchange where BL I-96 transitions between North and Cedar/Larch streets; Cedar Street is a former routing of US 27
4.194 6.750 BL I-69 / M-43 west (Oakland Avenue) Oakland Avenue is a one-way street westbound
4.393 7.070 BL I-69 (Saginaw Avenue) / M-43 east Saginaw Avenue is a one-way street eastbound
4.893 7.875 Capitol Loop west Northern end of Capitol Loop concurrency
5.444–
5.458
8.761–
8.784
I-496
Capitol Loop west
Southern end of Capitol Loop concurrency and eastern terminus of the Capitol Loop; exit 7 on I-496
10.240–
10.259
16.480–
16.510
I-96 – Grand Rapids, Detroit Exit 104 on I-96; indirect access via trumpet interchange
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Howell[edit]

Business Loop Interstate 96
Location: Howell
Length: 7.803 mi[3] (12.558 km)
Existed: 1962[31][32]–present

Business Loop Interstate 96 (BL I-96) is a business loop of I-96 through the city of Howell. The western terminus is at the M-59 interchange with I-96 northwest of Howell. BL I-96 runs concurrently with M-59 along a four-lane divided highway for about a one mile (1.6 km) before turning southeasterly onto Grand River Avenue near the Livingston County Airport. The business loop passes through a residential neighborhood on the western side of Howell before entering downtown. In downtown, BL I-96 runs along a four-lane street and meets the northern end of the unsigned M-155 at Michigan Avenue. Southeast of downtown, the business loop passes through more residential areas before following a commercial corridor to a partial interchange with I-96 south of Lake Chemung.[33][34]

When the state highway system was first signposted in 1919,[7] the east–west highway across the Lower Peninsula through Howell to Detroit was assigned the M-16 designation.[8] This was redesignated US 16 in 1926.[9] In 1962, I-96 was completed between Lansing and Brighton, and US 16 was decommissioned in Michigan. At the time, a new limited-access connector road was constructed between I-96 and Grand River Avenue, providing access for the business loop and M-59 to I-96. Afterwards, the former route of US 16 along Grand River Avenue through Howell was redesignated BL I-96.[31][32]

Major intersections
The entire highway is in Livingston County.

Location mi[3] km Destinations Notes
Howell Township 0.000 0.000 I-96 – Lansing, Detroit
M-59 east
Western end of M-59 concurrency; exit 133 on I-96
1.004 1.616 M-59 east (Highland Road) – Pontiac Eastern end of M-59 concurrency
Howell 3.645 5.866 M-155 south (Michigan Avenue) Northern terminus of the unsigned M-155
7.803 12.558 I-96 east – Detroit Westbound entrance and eastbound exit; exit 141 on I-96
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Farmington[edit]

Business Loop Interstate 96
Location: Farmington
Length: 4.129 mi[3] (6.645 km)
Existed: 1961[31][35]–present
History: Signage removed in 1977[36][37]

Old Business Loop I-96 (Old BL I-96) is a 4.129-mile-long (6.645 km) segment of unsigned state trunkline highway and was a former business loop of I-96 along Grand River Avenue through the city of Farmington. The western terminus is at the interchange between M-5 and Grand River Avenue west of the city. From there, the highway runs eastward through residential areas on the border of Farmington and Farmington Hills. At the intersection with Shiawasee Road, Grand River Avenue turns southeasterly into downtown Farmington. The highway is bounded by businesses from downtown southeasterly to its eastern terminus is at the intersection between M-5 and Grand River Avenue southeast of Farmington.[38][39]

When the state highway system was first signposted in 1919,[7] the east–west highway across the Lower Peninsula through Lansing to Detroit was assigned the M-16 designation.[8] This highway was the original route of US 16 though downtown Farmington.[9] In 1933, US 16 was routed onto a bypass route which had been constructed south of the city (the present-day Freedom Road) and the route through Farmington was retained as state trunkline.[40][41] In 1956, a new bypass freeway was built just to the south of the old bypass as part of the Brighton–Farmington Expressway and the route through downtown was designated Business US 16. (Bus. US 16)[42][43]

The original plans for I-96 called for it to replace US 16 and to run parallel to Grand River Avenue all the way from Farmington into downtown Detroit. In 1959, the Farmington bypass freeway was given the I-96 designation in addition to the US 16 moniker,[44] and the business route was redesignated as BL I-96 two years later.[31][35] In 1977, as the Jeffries Freeway was completed, I-96 was rerouted south through Livonia and then east into Detroit, the portion of freeway bypassing Farmington was redesignated M-102. Simultaneously, the BL I-96 designation through downtown Farmington was removed,[36][37] and Grand River Avenue became an unsigned state trunkline, a status it has retained to this day.[38]

Major intersections
The entire highway is in Oakland County.

Location mi[3] km Destinations Notes
Farmington Hills 0.000 0.000 M-5 Interchange
Farmington 1.723 2.773 Shiawassee Road
2.166 3.486 Farmington Road
Farmington Hills 4.129 6.645 M-5 / Grand River Avenue Roadway continues as M-5
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Detroit[edit]

Business Spur Interstate 96
Location: Detroit
Length: 7.083 mi[3] (11.399 km)
Existed: 1962[31][32]–present
History: Signage removed in 1977[36][37]

Old Business Spur I-96 (Old BS I-96) is the section of Grand River Avenue in Detroit between I-96 and the intersection with Cass Avenue and Middle Street in downtown Detroit and an unsigned state trunkline highway. It was previously a business spur of I-96. Picking up where M-5 ends at the interchange with I-96, Old BS I-96 follows Grand River Avenue southeasterly. The road itself is bounded by businesses as it passes through residential neighborhoods on Detroit's West Side. About a mile and three-quarters (2.8 km) along, the highway crosses I-96 again, and I-96 from here into the downtown area parallels Grand River Avenue. Old BS I-96 here is mostly residential. It passes Bishop Park near Grand Boulevard and then crosses I-94. In the North Corktown neighborhood, Grand River Avenue crosses M-10 (Lodge Freeway) near the MotorCity Casino. About a half mile (0.7 km) past M-10, Old BS I-96 crosses I-75 (Fisher Freeway) and enters Downtown Detroit's Foxtown neighborhood. State maintenance ends at the five-way intersection between Grand River Avenue, Cass Avenue, and Middle Street. Grand River Avenue continues another five blocks to Woodward Avenue and another four blocks as it curves in an arc around Grand Circus Park.[38][45]

When the state highway system was first signposted in 1919,[7] the east–west highway across the Lower Peninsula through Grand Rapids and Lansing to Detroit was assigned the M-16 designation.[8] The section of highway had previously been part of US 16.[46] When US 16 was decommissioned in 1962, Grand River Avenue was redesignated BS I-96.[31][32] Upon completion of I-96 (Jeffries Freeway) in Detroit in 1977, portions were re-designated M-102 and M-5.[36][37] From I-96 southeast into downtown Detroit, Grand River Avenue remained under state control as an unsigned state trunkline highway.[38] In 2004, the state transferred several blocks at the eastern end of Grand River Avenue to the City of Detroit. State jurisdiction now ends at the corner of Grand River Avenue, Middle Street, and Cass Avenue.[47][48]

Major intersections
The entire highway is in Detroit, Wayne County.

mi[3] km Destinations Notes
0.000 0.000 I-96 (Jeffries Freeway) – Lansing, Bridge to Canada
M-5 west
Exit 185 on I-96; eastern terminus of M-5
1.784–
1.808
2.871–
2.910
I-96 (Jeffries Freeway) – Lansing, Bridge to Canada Westbound entrance and eastbound exit from I-96; exit 187 on I-96
4.676–
4.686
7.525–
7.541
I-94 (Edsel Ford Freeway) – Ann Arbor, Port Huron Exit 214 on I-94
6.380–
6.397
10.268–
10.295
M-10 (Lodge Freeway) Southbound exit from and northbound entrance to M-10; exit 2C on M-10
6.793–
6.810
10.932–
10.960
I-75 (Fisher Freeway) – Toledo, Flint Exit 50 on I-75
7.083 11.399 Grand River Avenue
Cass Avenue
Middle Street
Roadway continues as Grand River Avenue
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Michigan Department of Transportation (1984). Official Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈3 mi. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. Muskegon inset. 
  2. ^ a b Michigan Department of Transportation (1985). Official Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈3 mi. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. Muskegon inset. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Michigan Department of Transportation & Michigan Center for Shared Solutions and Technology Partnerships (2009). MDOT Physical Reference Finder Application (Map). Michigan Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 30, 2012. 
  4. ^ a b c Michigan State Highway Department (1963). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. § K7. 
  5. ^ a b Michigan State Highway Department (1964). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. § K7. OCLC 81213707. 
  6. ^ Google (May 18, 2015). "Overview Map of the Former BS I-96 in Muskegon" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved May 18, 2015. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f "Michigan May Do Well Following Wisconsin's Road Marking System". The Grand Rapids Press. September 20, 1919. p. 10. OCLC 9975013. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f Michigan State Highway Department (July 1, 1919). State of Michigan: Lower Peninsula (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. OCLC 15607244. 
  9. ^ a b c d e Bureau of Public Roads & American Association of State Highway Officials (November 11, 1926). United States System of Highways Adopted for Uniform Marking by the American Association of State Highway Officials (Map). 1:7,000,000. Washington, DC: U.S. Geological Survey. OCLC 32889555. Retrieved November 7, 2013 – via University of North Texas Libraries. 
  10. ^ Michigan State Highway Department & Rand McNally (September 1, 1934). Official Michigan Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. 
  11. ^ Michigan State Highway Department & Rand McNally (April 15, 1940). Official Michigan Highway Map (Map) (Spring ed.). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. § K8. 
  12. ^ Michigan State Highway Department & Rand McNally (July 15, 1940). Official Michigan Highway Map (Map) (Summer ed.). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. § K8. 
  13. ^ "Michigan Freeway Hits 1,000th Mile". The Milwaukee Sentinel. December 13, 1962. Part 1, p. 12. ISSN 1052-4479 – via Google News. 
  14. ^ "Drop US 16 Designation". Holland Evening Sentinel. April 14, 1962. p. 2. OCLC 13440201. 
  15. ^ "New Numbers Seen for Road". Holland Evening Sentinel. October 23, 1963. p. 4. OCLC 13440201. 
  16. ^ Michigan State Housing Development Authority (n.d.). "SS Milwaukee Clipper". National Historic Landmarks. Michigan State Housing Development Authority. Retrieved May 18, 2015. 
  17. ^ a b Staff (October 31, 2007). "Contract Number 103107". Michigan Department of Transportation. Retrieved November 2, 2007. (registration required (help)). 
  18. ^ a b c Michigan Department of Transportation (February 2003). "Ionia County" (Map) (PDF). Right-of-Way File Application. Scale not given. Cartography by V3 Consultants. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. Sheet 71. Retrieved December 29, 2013. 
  19. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (2007). Official Department of Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈15 mi / 1 cm≈9 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. § L10. 
  20. ^ Google (May 18, 2015). "Overview Map of the Former BS I-96 in Portland" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved May 18, 2015. 
  21. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (1982). Official Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈14.5 mi / 1 in≈23 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. § L10. OCLC 320798736. 
  22. ^ a b Michigan State Highway Department (1962). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. Lansing inset. OCLC 173191490. 
  23. ^ a b c Michigan State Highway Department (1963). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. Lansing inset. 
  24. ^ a b Michigan Department of Transportation (2014). Pure Michigan: State Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈3.5 mi / 1 cm≈2 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. Lansing inset. OCLC 900162490. 
  25. ^ a b Google (May 18, 2015). "Overview Map of BL I-96 in Lansing" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved May 18, 2015. 
  26. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (May 1, 1925). Official Highway Condition Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. 
  27. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (September 15, 1925). Official Highway Condition Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. 
  28. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (1964). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. Lansing inset. OCLC 81213707. 
  29. ^ Michigan Department of State Highways (1966). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan Department of State Highways. Lansing inset. 
  30. ^ Michigan Department of State Highways (1967). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan Department of State Highways. 
  31. ^ a b c d e f Michigan State Highway Department (1962). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. Detroit Area inset. OCLC 173191490. 
  32. ^ a b c d Michigan State Highway Department (1963). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. Detroit Area inset. 
  33. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (2014). Pure Michigan: State Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈15 mi / 1 cm≈9 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. § L12 (main map), §§ B1–B2 (Detroit Area inset). OCLC 900162490. 
  34. ^ Google (May 18, 2015). "Overview Map of BL I-96 in Howell" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved May 18, 2015. 
  35. ^ a b Michigan State Highway Department (1961). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. Detroit Area inset. OCLC 51857665.  (Includes all changes through July 1, 1961)
  36. ^ a b c d Official Transportation Map (Map) (1978–79 ed.). 1 in:3 mi. Cartography by MDSHT. Michigan Department of State Highways and Transportation. 1978. Detroit Area inset. § D5–E9. 
  37. ^ a b c d Michigan Department of Transportation (2015). Pure Michigan: State Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈2.5 mi / 1 cm≈1.75 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. Detroit Area inset. §§ D5–E9. 
  38. ^ a b c d Michigan Department of Transportation (2014). Truck Operator's Map (Map). 1 in≈3.5 mi / 1 cm≈2 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. Detroit and Vicinity inset. 
  39. ^ Google (May 18, 2015). "Overview Map of Old BL I-95 in Farmington" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved May 18, 2015. 
  40. ^ Michigan State Highway Department & Rand McNally (May 1, 1933). Official Michigan Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. 
  41. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (2015). Pure Michigan: State Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈15 mi / 1 cm≈9 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. 
  42. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (April 15, 1956). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. Detroit Area inset. 
  43. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (October 1, 1956). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. §§ K8, L10, M12–M13. 
  44. ^ "Michigan Delays Road Number System". Toledo Blade. June 4, 1959. p. 11. Retrieved November 21, 2010 – via Google News. 
  45. ^ Google (May 18, 2015). "Overview Map of Old BS I-96 in Detroit" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved May 18, 2015. 
  46. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (1958). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. §§ L11, L12. OCLC 51856742.  (Includes all changes through July 1, 1958)
  47. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (2004). Truck Operator's Map (Map). 1 in≈3.5 mi / 1 cm≈2 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. Detroit and Vicinity inset. 
  48. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (2005). Truck Operator's Map (Map). 1 in≈3.5 mi / 1 cm≈2 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. Detroit and Vicinity inset. 

External links[edit]

Route map: Bing