Iohexol

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Iohexol
Iohexol.svg
Systematic (IUPAC) name
1-N,3-N-bis(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)-5-[N-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)acetamido]-2,4,6-triiodobenzene-1,3-dicarboxamide
Clinical data
AHFS/Drugs.com Micromedex Detailed Consumer Information
Pregnancy
category
  • US: B (No risk in non-human studies)
Routes of
administration
Intrathecal, intravascular, oral, intracavital, rectal
Legal status
Legal status
  • ℞ (Prescription only)
Pharmacokinetic data
Protein binding Low
Metabolism Nil
Biological half-life Variable
Excretion Renal, unchanged
Identifiers
CAS Number 66108-95-0 YesY
ATC code V08AB02 (WHO)
PubChem CID 3730
DrugBank DB01362 YesY
ChemSpider 3599 YesY
UNII 4419T9MX03 YesY
KEGG D01817 YesY
ChEBI CHEBI:31709 YesY
ChEMBL CHEMBL1200455 N
Synonyms 5-[N-(2,3-Dihydroxypropyl)acetamido]-2,4,6-triiodo-N,N'-bis(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)isophthalamide
Chemical data
Formula C19H26I3N3O9
Molar mass 821.138 g/mol
 NYesY (what is this?)  (verify)

Iohexol is a contrast agent, sold under the trade names Omnipaque and Exypaque; this compound is also sold as a density gradient medium under the names Accudenz, Histodenz and Nycodenz.[1][2] It is available in various concentrations, from 140 to 350 milligrams of iodine per milliliter. Omnipaque 350 is commonly used as a contrast agent during coronary angiography.

The osmolality of iohexol ranges from 322 mOsm/kg—approximately 1.1 times that of blood plasma—to 844 mOsm/kg, almost three times that of blood.[3] Despite this difference, iohexol is still considered a low-osmolality contrast agent; the osmolality of older agents, such as diatrizoate, may be more than twice as high.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "HistoDenz (D2158)", product information sheet, Sigma-Aldrich. Accessed on line Nov. 19, 2015.
  2. ^ "Nycodenz®: A universal density gradient medium", Axis-Shield Density Gradient Media. Accessed on line Nov. 19, 2015.
  3. ^ GE Healthcare (May 2006). "Omnipaque (Iohexol) injection. Product label". DailyMed. U.S. National Library of Medicine. Retrieved 2007-03-28. 
  4. ^ Amersham Health (April 2006). "Hypaque (Diatrizoate Meglumine and Diatrizoate Sodium) injection, solution. Product label". DailyMed. U.S. National Library of Medicine. Retrieved 2007-03-29. 

External links[edit]