Iota Cancri

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Iota Cancri
Author: Jeffrey Fisher, http://jeffreysboldlygoingnowhere.com/
Iota Cancri
Credit: Jeffrey Fisher
Observation data
Epoch J2000.0      Equinox J2000.0
Constellation Cancer
Iota Cancri A
Right ascension 08h 46m 41.81988s
Declination +28° 45′ 35.6190″
Apparent magnitude (V) 4.028
Iota Cancri B
Right ascension 08h 46m 39.98118s
Declination +28° 45′ 54.1932″
Apparent magnitude (V) 6.57
Characteristics
Spectral type G8Iab + A2V
Astrometry
Iota Cancri A
Radial velocity (Rv) 15.74 ± 0.13 km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: -21.58 ± 0.75 mas/yr
Dec.: -45.69 ± 0.56 mas/yr
Parallax (π) 9.85 ± 0.61 mas
Distance 330 ± 20 ly
(102 ± 6 pc)
Iota Cancri B
Radial velocity (Rv) 25.00 ± 1.5 km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: -22.74 ± 3.45 mas/yr
Dec.: -46.36 ± 2.56 mas/yr
Parallax (π) 11.69 ± 2.75 mas
Distance 280 ± 10 ly
(approx. 90 pc)
Other designations
48 Cancri,
Iota Cancri A: 48 Cancri A, HR 3475, HD 74739, BD+29°1824, HIP 43103, SAO 80416
Iota Cancri B: 48 Cancri B, HR 3474, HD 74738, BD+29°1823, HIP 43100, SAO 80415

Iota Cancri (ι Cnc, ι Cancri) is a double star in the constellation Cancer. The brighter component is approximately 298 light years from Earth.

The brighter star is a yellow G-type bright giant with an apparent magnitude of +4.02. The companion is a white A-type main sequence dwarf with an apparent magnitude of +6.57. The two stars are separated by 30.6 arcseconds on the sky, and are resolvable through a small telescope.[1]

Despite having different distances when measured by the HIPPARCOS satellite, the two stars share a common proper motion and appear to be a natural binary star system.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Kaler, James B. "Iota Cancri". Stars. University of Illinois. Retrieved 29 May 2015.