Iowa Hawkeyes women's basketball

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Iowa Hawkeyes
2019–20 Iowa Hawkeyes women's basketball team
Iowa Hawkeyes wordmark.svg
UniversityUniversity of Iowa
Head coachLisa Bluder (20th season)
ConferenceBig Ten
LocationIowa City, Iowa
ArenaCarver-Hawkeye Arena
(Capacity: 15,400)
NicknameHawkeyes
Student sectionHawks Nest
ColorsBlack and Gold[1]
         
Uniforms
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Home jersey
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Team colours
Home
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Away jersey
Team colours
Team colours
Away
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Alternate jersey
Kit shorts blacksides.png
Team colours
Alternate
NCAA Tournament Final Four
1993
NCAA Tournament Elite Eight
1987, 1988, 1993, 2019
NCAA Tournament Sweet Sixteen
1987, 1988, 1989, 1993, 1996, 2015, 2019
NCAA Tournament Appearances
1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2018, 2019
Conference Tournament Champions
1997, 2001, 2019
Conference Regular Season Champions
1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1992, 1993, 1996, 1998, 2008
Members of Iowa's women's basketball team celebrate their 2008 regular season Big Ten championship on March 2, 2008.

The Iowa Hawkeyes women's basketball team represents the University of Iowa in Iowa City, Iowa, United States. The team is a member of the Big Ten Conference as well as the National Collegiate Athletic Association. The team plays its regular season games at 15,400-seat Carver-Hawkeye Arena, along with men's basketball, wrestling, and volleyball teams.

History[edit]

Iowa women's basketball began in 1974, under head coach Lark Birdsong. The first Iowa team finished 5–16 in 1974-75, its first victory over the Minnesota Golden Gophers. Birdsong coached Iowa until 1978-79, which marked Iowa's first winning season.[2] Birdsong was subsequently replaced by Judy McMullen, who led the program for the next four years. McMullen was succeeded in 1983 by former Cheyney University coach C. Vivian Stringer. Prior to her stay at Iowa, Stringer led the Cheyney Wolves to the 1982 NCAA championship.[3]

Beginning with the 1983–84 season, Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame inductee Stringer coached at Iowa for 12 seasons. In that time, the Hawkeyes won six Big Ten championships, played in nine NCAA Tournaments, and reached the Final Four in 1993. Unprecedented attention was shown to the Hawkeyes under Stringer, as evidenced by the record-setting 22,157 fans that watched Iowa play Ohio State on February 3, 1985, in Carver-Hawkeye Arena.[4] Stringer, however, left Iowa to coach at Rutgers in 1995, following the death of her husband, Bill.[5]

Angie Lee replaced Stringer, and led the Hawkeyes to a Big Ten championship in her first season. Under Lee, Iowa won another Big Ten title in 1998. In 2000, Lee's successor as head coach was Lisa Bluder. Bluder is Iowa's current women's basketball coach. Under Bluder, the Hawkeyes have won one regular season Big Ten championship and two Big Ten Tournament championships.

From 2015 to 2019, Megan Gustafson has played for Coach Bluder and the women’s basketball program at Iowa. Gustafson was named the 2019 National Player of the year, after averaging a double-double of 27.8 points and 13.4 rebounds on 69.9% shooting. The 2018–19 Iowa Hawkeyes women's basketball team had a 29-7 regular season record, winning the Big Ten Conference Tournament Championship and advancing to the Elite Eight of the 2019 NCAA Division I Women's Basketball Tournament.[6][7][citation needed]

NCAA Tournament results[edit]

Year Seed Round Opponent Result
1986 #5 Second Round #4 Tennessee L 68−73
1987 #3 Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#6 New Orleans
#2 Georgia
#1 Louisiana Tech
W 68–56
W 62–60
L 65−66
1988 #1 Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#8 Stephen F. Austin
#4 Southern Cal
#2 Long Beach State
W 83–65
W 79–67
L 78−98
1989 #3 Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#11 Tennessee Tech
#2 Stanford
W 77–75
L 74−98
1990 #3 Second Round #6 Vanderbilt L 56−61
1991 #6 First Round
Second Round
#11 Montana
#3 Washington
W 64–53
L 53−70
1992 #1 Second Round #8 SW Missouri State L 60−61 (OT)
1993 #2 Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
#7 Old Dominion
#3 Auburn
#1 Tennessee
#1 Ohio State
W 82–56
W 63–50
W 72−56
L 72–73 (OT)
1994 #3 First Round
Second Round
#14 Mount St. Mary's
#6 Alabama
W 70–47
L 78−84
1996 #2 First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#15 Butler
#7 DePaul
#3 Vanderbilt
W 72–67
W 72−71
L 63–74
1997 #9 First Round
Second Round
#8 NC State
#1 Connecticut
W 56–50
L 53−72
1998 #4 First Round
Second Round
#13 Massachusetts
#5 Kansas
W 77–59
L 58−62
2001 #4 First Round
Second Round
#13 Oregon
#5 Utah
W 88–82
L 69−78
2002 #9 First Round
Second Round
#8 Virginia
#1 Connecticut
W 69–62
L 48−86
2004 #9 First Round #8 Virginia Tech L 76−89
2006 #10 First Round #7 BYU L 62−67
2008 #9 First Round #8 Georgia L 61−67
2009 #8 First Round #9 Georgia Tech L 62−76
2010 #8 First Round
Second Round
#9 Rutgers
#1 Stanford
W 70–63
L 67−96
2011 #6 First Round #11 Gonzaga L 86−92
2012 #9 First Round #8 California L 74−84
2013 #9 First Round
Second Round
#8 Miami (FL)
#1 Notre Dame
W 69–53
L 57−74
2014 #6 First Round
Second Round
#11 Marist
#3 Louisville
W 87–65
L 53−83
2015 #3 First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#14 American
#11 Miami (FL)
#2 Baylor
W 75–67
W 88−70
L 66–81
2018 #6 First Round #11 Creighton L 70−76
2019 #2 First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#15 Mercer
#7 Missouri
#3 NC State
#1 Baylor
W 66–61
W 68−52
W 79–61
L 53–85

References[edit]

  1. ^ The University of Iowa Official Colors (PDF). University of Iowa Hawkeyes Brand Standards Manual. March 22, 2019. Retrieved May 13, 2019.
  2. ^ "Hawkeye Sports Official Athletic Site - Women's Basketball". Hawkeyesports.cstv.com. Retrieved 2016-01-13.
  3. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20090325055739/http://www.scarletknights.com/basketball-women/coaches/stringer.html. Archived from the original on March 25, 2009. Retrieved July 13, 2009. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  4. ^ Carver-Hawkeye Arena: Celebrating 25 Years. Iowa Sports Information, 2008.
  5. ^ Smith, Claire (1995-12-10). "COLLEGE BASKETBALL - A Coaching Legend Comes Home - Personal Loss Spurs Stringer's Move to Help Rutgers Rebuild - NYTimes.com". New York Times. Retrieved 2016-01-13.
  6. ^ "Women's college basketball player of the year: Iowa's Megan Gustafson". 2019-03-15.
  7. ^ "Women's NCAA tournament 2019: Megan Gustafson's double-double delivers Iowa to Sweet 16". 2019-03-24.

External links[edit]