Ira Jones

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For the British flying ace, see James Ira Thomas Jones.
Ira Jones
Irajones.jpg
Ira Jones with Elvis Presley in Germany
Born (1923-07-10)July 10, 1923
Arkansas
Died July 11, 2004(2004-07-11) (aged 81)
Arkansas
Allegiance United States
Service/branch United States Army
Rank First sergeant
Unit 3rd Armored Division
Battles/wars World War II
Awards
Other work
  • Author
  • Public speaker

Ira Jones (July 10, 1923 – July 11, 2004) was an author, best known as the first sergeant in charge of Elvis Presley for a portion of the time Elvis served in the army. Elvis drove Jones' jeep for nine months while the two were stationed together in Germany. Jones was also a veteran of World War II and a recipient of both the Bronze and Silver Stars.

The two first met in the port city of Bremerhaven, Germany, in the autumn of 1958 when Elvis was among the replacement troops arriving aboard the USS General Randall.

Elvis drove Jones in a jeep named "HQ 31" for nine months while serving in the Scout Platoon, 1st Medium Tank Battalion, 32nd Armor, of the 3rd Armored Division, part of the U.S. Seventh Army. Although Jones had no idea what Elvis looked like before they met, it has been reported that the two formed a close bond during their time together. 1

On May 6, 1959, Sgt Jones appeared on the popular television game show I've Got A Secret.

Cover for Soldier Boy Elvis

In 1978, Jones began writing a book about the time he spent with Elvis, entitled Soldier Boy Elvis. The book was published in 1992. In the years that followed, Jones became a regular speaker at Elvis-related conventions, Bill E. Burk's Elvis World breakfasts and fan club meetings all over the world including in Germany.

Jones appeared in numerous television specials, documentaries and videos including the short-lived newsmagazine Instant Recall, hosted by John Palmer, former news anchor from NBC's The Today Show and the 2001 documentary Remembering Elvis: A Documentary [1], which also included interviews with comedian Steve Allen and others.

Jones died of a heart attack in July 2004 in the U.S. state of Arkansas where he grew up.

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