Iris psammocola

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Iris psammocola
Scientific classification
Kingdom:
(unranked):
(unranked):
Order:
Family:
Subfamily:
Tribe:
Genus:
Subgenus:
Section:
Pseudoregelia
Species:
Iris psammocola
Binomial name
Iris psammocola
Synonyms

Iris potaninii var. arenaria Doronkin [1]

Iris psammocola is a species in the genus Iris, it is also in the subgenus of Iris and in the Pseudoregelia section. It is a rhizomatous perennial, from China. It has grass-like leaves, short stems, yellow flowers. It is cultivated as an ornamental plant in temperate regions.

Description[edit]

It has short, obconical (like an inverted cone) rhizomes, with slender secondary roots underneath. The top of the rhizome has dense straight fibres.[2][3]

It has narrow, linear leaves, that can grow up to between 8–13 cm (3–5 in) long, and between 0.2 and 0.4 cm wide. They have a pointed end.[2]

It has a very short slender stem, that can grow up to between 3–4 cm (1–2 in) tall.[2]

The stem has 2 lanceolate and (scarious) membranous spathe (leaves of the flower bud). They are between 3.5–4 cm (1–2 in) long and about 0.8 cm wide. They have a distinct midvein.[2]

The stems hold 1 terminal (top of stem) flower, blooming between April and May.[2]

The yellow flowers are 4–5 cm (2–2 in) in diameter.[2] They have a very short pedicel and slender perianth tube, that is 4–4.5 cm (2–2 in) long.

Like other irises, it has 2 pairs of petals, 3 large sepals (outer petals), known as the 'falls' and 3 inner, smaller petals (or tepals), known as the 'standards'.[4] The falls have an obovate limb (part of the petal beside the stem), they are 4 cm (2 in) long and 1.5 cm wide. In the centre of the petal is a beard. The erect standards are oblanceolate and 3.5 cm (1 in) long and 4 cm wide.[2]

It has 1.5 cm long stamens, and style branches that are 3.5 cm long.[2]

After the iris has flowered, it produces an seed capsule which has not been described.

Biochemistry[edit]

As most irises are diploid, having two sets of chromosomes, this can be used to identify hybrids and classification of groupings.[4] Nothing has been reported currently as of August 2015, about a chromosome count of the iris.

Taxonomy[edit]

It is written as 沙生鸢尾 in Chinese script and known as sha sheng yuan wei in Pidgin.[2]

It is commonly known in China as 'Sandy iris'.[5]

The Latin specific epithet psammocola refers to an amalgamation of 2 Greek words. 'Psammo' – sand, and 'cola' – living in.[6]

It was originally collected in the desert dunes of Baijiatan (White House Beach), near the city of Lingwu, in Ningxia on the 10 April 1959.[5]

It was first published and described by Yu Tang Zhao in 'Acta Phytotax. Sin.' Vol.30 Issue 2 on page 181 in 1992.[7][8][9]

It was verified by United States Department of Agriculture and the Agricultural Research Service on 4 April 2003, then updated on 29 September 2008.[8]

It is listed in the Encyclopedia of Life.[10]

As of August 2015, Iris psammocola is not yet an accepted name by the RHS.

Distribution and habitat[edit]

It is native to temperate Asia.[8]

Range[edit]

It is found in China,[7] within the province of Ningxia.[2][8][10]

geographic distribution Asia – China – Ningxia Hui Ningxia Dune Region, China[9]

Habitat[edit]

It grows in the desert dunes.[2][10]

Toxicity[edit]

Like many other irises, most parts of the plant are poisonous (rhizome and leaves), if mistakenly ingested can cause stomach pains and vomiting. Also handling the plant may cause a skin irritation or an allergic reaction.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Iris psammocola Y.T.Zhao is an accepted name". theplantlist.org (The Plant List). 23 March 2012. Retrieved 17 July 2015.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "FOC Vol. 24 Page 311". efloras.org (Flora of China). Retrieved 15 August 2015.
  3. ^ Zhao, Yu Tang (1992). "A new species of Iris from China" (PDF). Acta Phytotaxonomica Sinica. 30 (2): 181–182. Retrieved 17 August 2015.
  4. ^ a b Austin, Claire (2005). Irises; A Garden Encyclopedia. Timber Press. ISBN 0881927309.
  5. ^ a b "Type specimens and literature". cvh.ac.cn (Chinese Virtue Herbarium (CVH)). Retrieved 15 August 2015.
  6. ^ D. Gledhill The Names of Plants, p. 326, at Google Books
  7. ^ a b "Iridaceae Iris psammocola Y.T.Zhao". ipni.org (International Plant Names Index). Retrieved 17 July 2015.
  8. ^ a b c d "Iris psammocola". Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN). Agricultural Research Service (ARS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Retrieved 16 July 2015.
  9. ^ a b Franco, Alain (3 December 2013). "(SPEC) Iris psammocola Y.T.Zhao". wiki.irises.org (American Iris Society). Retrieved 15 August 2015.
  10. ^ a b c "Iris psammocola". eol.org. Retrieved 15 August 2015.
  11. ^ David G Spoerke and Susan C. SmolinskeToxicity of Houseplants, p. 236, at Google Books

Sources[edit]

  • Wu Zheng-yi & P. H. Raven et al., eds. 1994–. Flora of China (English edition).
  • Doronkin, V.M. & Shaulo, D.N. 2007, Iris psammocola (Iridaceae) a new species to the flora of Russia, Bot. Zhurn. 92(3): 435–439

External links[edit]