Irish Deaf Society

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Irish Deaf Society
Map of Ireland
Zone of influence
AbbreviationIDS
Formation1981
TypeNon-governmental organisation
PurposeAdvocacy
HeadquartersDublin, Ireland
Location
  • 30 Blessington Street, Dublin 7
Coordinates53°21′24.66″N 6°16′06.16″W / 53.3568500°N 6.2683778°W / 53.3568500; -6.2683778
Region served
Ireland
Membership
Ordinary members
Associate members
Honorary members
Non-residential members[1]
Official language
English
John Mangan
Main organ
Board of Directors
AffiliationsWorld Federation of the Deaf
The European Union of the Deaf
Staff
15[2]
Websitehttp://www.deaf.ie

The Irish Deaf Society (IDS) is the national representative organisation of the Deaf community in Ireland. It upholds the status of Irish Sign Language (ISL), which is the first and preferred language of Deaf people in Ireland. The Society, a growing and vital organization,[3] provides a number of specific health, personal and social services to deaf adults, children and their families.

The IDS is recognised by the World Federation of the Deaf and The European Union of the Deaf, non-governmental organisations that represent National Associations of the Deaf at the world and European Union levels.

Purpose[edit]

The IDS seeks to enhance the standard of living and quality of life for all Deaf people. The Society recognizes that the Deaf have traditionally faced the threats of poverty, limited employment opportunities, and other difficulties because of the lack of public understanding or appreciation for their essential needs.[citation needed] Therefore, their mission statement reads:

The Irish Deaf Society as Ireland's National Association OF the Deaf, strives to highlight the societal needs of all sections in the Deaf community, advocates the human rights of the Deaf through empowerment and achieve equal access in all aspects of life endowed by the full Irish citizenship. The empowerment and equality shall be through upholding the status of Irish Sign Language and its related culture and norms[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Allen, Colin; Hedberg, Tomas; Posada, Martha Lucia Osorno; Søndergaard, Knud (July 2009) [Originally published March 2009]. "7.8 Information on the membership of the National Association of the Deaf". Survey Results on the Status of the National Associations of the Deaf (PDF) (Updated ed.). World Federation of the Deaf. p. 43. ISBN 978-952-9648-19-1. Retrieved 22 August 2010.
  2. ^ Allen, Colin; Hedberg, Tomas; Posada, Martha Lucia Osorno; Søndergaard, Knud (July 2009) [Originally published March 2009]. "7.13 Information on the paid staff members of the National Association of the Deaf". Survey Results on the Status of the National Associations of the Deaf (PDF) (Updated ed.). World Federation of the Deaf. p. 94. ISBN 978-952-9648-19-1. Retrieved 22 August 2010.
  3. ^ LeMaster, Barbara (2003). "8. School Language and Shifts in Irish Deaf Identity". In Monaghan, Leila; Schmaling, Constanze; Nakamura, Karen; et al. Many Ways to be Deaf: international variation in deaf communities. Washington, DC: Gallaudet University. p. 166. ISBN 1-56368-135-8. In my most recent visit during the summer of 2000, I found the IDS to be a growing and vital organization.
  4. ^ "Purpose of the IDS". Irish Deaf Society. Retrieved 22 August 2010.

External links[edit]