Iron(II) carbonate

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iron(II) carbonate
Names
Other names
ferrous carbonate
Identifiers
3D model (Jmol)
ECHA InfoCard 100.008.418
Properties
Molar mass 115.854 g/mol
Appearance white powder or crystals
Density 3.9 g/cm3[1]
Melting point decomposes
0.0067 g/l;[2] Ksp = 1.28 × 10−11 [3]
+11,300·10−6 cm3/mol
Structure
Hexagonal scalenohedral / Trigonal (32/m)
Space group: R 3c, a = 4.6916 Å, c = 15.3796 Å
6
Related compounds
Other anions
copper(II) carbonate, zinc carbonate
Other cations
iron(II) sulfate
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

iron(II) carbonate, or ferrous carbonate, is a chemical compound with formula FeCO
3
, that occurs naturally as the mineral siderite. At ordinary ambient temperatures, it is a white ionic solid consisting or iron(II) cations Fe2+
and carbonate anions CO2−
3
.[4]

Preparation[edit]

Ferrous carbonate can be prepared by reacting solution of the two ions, such as iron(II) chloride and sodium carbonate:[4]

FeCl
2
+ Na
2
CO
3
FeCO
3
+ 2NaCl

Ferrous carbonate can be prepared also from solutions of an iron(II) salt, such as iron(II) perchlorate, with sodium bicarbonate, releasing carbon dioxide:[5]

Fe(ClO
4
)2 + 2NaHCO
3
FeCO
3
+ 2NaClO
4
+ CO
2
+ H
2
O

Sel and others used this reaction (but with FeCl
2
instead of Fe(ClO
4
)2) at 0.2 M to prepare amorphous FeCO
3
.[6]

Care must be taken to exclude oxygen O
2
from the solutions, because the Fe2+
ion is easily oxidized to Fe3+
, especially at pH above 6.0.[5]

Ferrous carbonate also forms directly on steel or iron surfaces exposed to solutions of carbon dioxide, forming an "iron carbonate" scale:[3]

Fe + CO
2
+ H
2
O
FeCO
3
+ H
2

Properties[edit]

The dependency of the solubility in water with temperature was determined by Wei Sun and others to be

where T is the absolute temperature in kelvins, and I is the ionic strength of the liquid.[3]

Uses[edit]

Ferrous carbonate has been used as an iron dietary supplement to treat anemia.[7]

Toxicity[edit]

Ferrous carbonate is moderately toxic; the probable oral lethal dose is between 0.5 and 5 g/kg (between 35 and 350 g for a 70 kg person).[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ D R. Lide, ed.(2000): "CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics". 81st Edition. Pages 4-65.
  2. ^ Patty, F., ed. (1963): "Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology"; volume II: 'Toxicology". 2nd ed. Interscience. Page 1053.
  3. ^ a b c Wei Sun (2009): "Kinetics of iron carbonate and iron sulfide scale formation in CO2/H2S corrosion". PhD Thesis, Ohio University.
  4. ^ a b (1995): "Kirk-Othmer Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology". 4th ed. Volume 1.
  5. ^ a b Philip C. Singer and Werner Stumm (1970): "The solubility of ferrous iron in carbonate-bearing waters". Journal of the American Water Works Association, volume 62, issue 3, pages 198-202. http://www.jstor.org/stable/41266171
  6. ^ Ozlem Sel, A.V. Radha, Knud Dideriksen, and Alexandra Navrotsky (2012): "Amorphous iron (II) carbonate: Crystallization energetics and comparison to other carbonate minerals related to CO2 sequestration". Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, volume 87, issue 15, pages 61–68. doi:10.1016/j.gca.2012.03.011
  7. ^ A .Osol and J. E. Hoover and others, eds. (1975): "Remington's Pharmaceutical Sciences". 15th ed. Mack Publishing. Page 775
  8. ^ Gosselin, R.E., H.C. Hodge, R.P. Smith, and M.N. Gleason. Clinical Toxicology of Commercial Products. 4th ed. Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins, 1976., p. II-97


Carbonates
H2CO3 He
Li2CO3,
LiHCO3
BeCO3 B C (NH4)2CO3,
NH4HCO3
O F Ne
Na2CO3,
NaHCO3,
Na3H(CO3)2
MgCO3,
Mg(HCO3)2
Al2(CO3)3 Si P S Cl Ar
K2CO3,
KHCO3
CaCO3,
Ca(HCO3)2
Sc Ti V Cr MnCO3 FeCO3 CoCO3 NiCO3 CuCO3 ZnCO3 Ga Ge As Se Br Kr
Rb2CO3 SrCO3 Y Zr Nb Mo Tc Ru Rh Pd Ag2CO3 CdCO3 In Sn Sb Te I Xe
Cs2CO3,
CsHCO3
BaCO3   Hf Ta W Re Os Ir Pt Au Hg Tl2CO3 PbCO3 (BiO)2CO3 Po At Rn
Fr Ra   Rf Db Sg Bh Hs Mt Ds Rg Cn Nh Fl Mc Lv Ts Og
La2(CO3)3 Ce Pr Nd Pm Sm Eu Gd Tb Dy Ho Er Tm Yb Lu
Ac Th Pa UO2CO3 Np Pu Am Cm Bk Cf Es Fm Md No Lr