Isaiah 61

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Isaiah 61
Great Isaiah Scroll.jpg
The Great Isaiah Scroll, the best preserved of the biblical scrolls found at Qumran from the second century BC, contains all the verses in this chapter.
BookBook of Isaiah
Hebrew Bible partNevi'im
Order in the Hebrew part5
CategoryLatter Prophets
Christian Bible partOld Testament
Order in the Christian part23

Isaiah 61 is the sixty-first chapter of the Book of Isaiah in the Hebrew Bible or the Old Testament of the Christian Bible. This book contains the prophecies attributed to the prophet Isaiah, and is one of the Books of the Prophets. Chapters 56-66 are often referred to as Trito-Isaiah.[1] In chapters 60-62, "three magnificent chapters", the prophet "hails the rising sun of Jerusalem’s prosperity".[2] According to Luke 4:17, Jesus, visiting the synagogue at Nazareth, was handed "the book of the prophet Isaiah" and "found the place" where the opening verses of this chapter were written. The New King James Version sub-titles this chapter "The Good News of Salvation".[3]

Text[edit]

The original text was written in Hebrew language. This chapter is divided into 11 verses.

Textual witnesses[edit]

Some early manuscripts containing the text of this chapter in Hebrew language:

  • Masoretic Text (10th century)
  • Dead Sea Scrolls:
    • 1QIsaa: complete
    • 1QIsab: extant: verses 1‑2
    • 4QIsab (4Q56): extant: verses 1‑3
    • 4QIsah (4Q62): extant: verses 1-2
    • 4QIsam (4Q66): extant: verses 3-6

There is also a translation into Koine Greek known as the Septuagint, made in the last few centuries BC. Extant ancient manuscripts of the Septuagint version include Codex Vaticanus (B; B; 4th century), Codex Sinaiticus (S; BHK: S; 4th century), Codex Alexandrinus (A; A; 5th century) and Codex Marchalianus (Q; Q; 6th century).[4]

Parashot[edit]

The parashah sections listed here are based on the Aleppo Codex.[5] Isaiah 61 is a part of the Consolations (Isaiah 40–66). {P}: open parashah; {S}: closed parashah.

{S} 61:1-9 {P} 61:10-11 [62:1-9 {S}]

Verse 1[edit]

The Spirit of the Lord God is upon me;
because the Lord hath anointed me to preach good tidings unto the meek;
he hath sent me to bind up the brokenhearted,
to proclaim liberty to the captives,
and the opening of the prison to them that are bound;[6]
  • Cited in Luke 4:18[7]
  • "The Spirit of the Lord God" has been promised in Isaiah 11:2 to come upon God's chosen one, through God's annointing (Hebrew: משח‎, mashah,[8] the root word for "Messiah").[7]
  • "The captives": The role of the Spirit-filled figure in to bring justice to the victims of injustice, as in Isaiah 11:4.[7]

Verse 2[edit]

To proclaim the acceptable year of the Lord,
and the day of vengeance of our God;
to comfort all that mourn;[9]

Verse 4[edit]

And they shall build the old wastes, they shall raise up the former desolations, and they shall repair the waste cities, the desolations of many generations.[10]

Cross reference: Isaiah 58:12

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Oxford Reference, Overview: Bernhard Duhm accessed 6 September 2018
  2. ^ Skinner, J., Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges on Isaiah 60, accessed 12 September 2018
  3. ^ Isaiah 61:1-11
  4. ^ Würthwein 1995, pp. 73-74.
  5. ^ As implemented in the Jewish Publication Society's 1917 edition of the Hebrew Bible in English.
  6. ^ Isaiah 61:1 KJV
  7. ^ a b c d e f Coggins 2007, p. 481.
  8. ^ a b Hebrew Text Analysis: Isaiah 61:1. Biblehub.com
  9. ^ Isaiah 61:2 KJV
  10. ^ Isaiah 61:4 KJV

Sources[edit]

  • Coggins, R (2007). "22. Isaiah". In Barton, John; Muddiman, John (eds.). The Oxford Bible Commentary (first (paperback) ed.). Oxford University Press. pp. 433–486. ISBN 978-0199277186. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  • Würthwein, Ernst (1995). The Text of the Old Testament. Translated by Rhodes, Erroll F. Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans. ISBN 0-8028-0788-7. Retrieved January 26, 2019.

External links[edit]

Jewish[edit]

Christian[edit]