Isham baronets

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Isham family coat of arms

The Isham Baronetcy, of Lamport in the County of Northampton, is a title in the Baronetage of England.

Isham baronets, of Lamport (1627)[edit]

History of the baronetcy[edit]

The Isham baronetcy was created on 30 May 1627 for John Isham, High Sheriff of Northamptonshire. He was succeeded by his son Justinian, the second Baronet, who fought as a Royalist in the Civil War and sat as Member of Parliament for Northamptonshire after the Restoration. Justinian II, the fourth Baronet represented Northampton and Northamptonshire in the House of Commons while Justinian III and Edmund, the fifth and sixth Baronets, both represented Northamptonshire. Sir Gyles Isham, the twelfth Baronet, in 1958 was High Sheriff of Northamptonshire.

The family surname is pronounced "Eye-shum", and derives from the village of Isham, Northamptonshire. The family coat of arms are described as, "gules, a fesse wavy, and in chief three piles, also wavy, points meeting in fesse, argent". The family seat is Lamport Hall in Northamptonshire.

Succession[edit]

The heir apparent to the baronetcy is the 14th Baronet's eldest son, Richard Leonard Vere Isham (born 1958). His heir apparent is his eldest son, Angus David Vere Isham (born 1992)

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

  • Lamport Hall – Past and Present (the official guidebook), 1992, Lamport Hall Preservation Trust, Lamport Hall, Northamptonshire, 28 p.
  • Betham, William (1801), "Isham of Lamport, Northamptonshire" in The Baronetage of England, of the History of the English Baronets, and such Baronets of Scotland, etc, Burrell and Bransby, Ipswich, England, v. 1, p. 298-305.
  • Debrett, John (1824), "Isham, of Lamport, co. Northampton" in Debrett's Baronetage of England (Fifth Edition), G. Woodfall, London, v. 1, p. 104-107.
  • Salzman, L.F. (ed.) (1937). "Parishes: Langport with Hanging Houghton". A History of the County of Northampton: v. 4. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 9 April 2013. 

External links[edit]