Islam in the Republic of Macedonia

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Map of the muftiships of Macedonia.

Muslims in the Republic of Macedonia represent one-third of the nation's total population,[1][2] making Islam the second most widely professed religion in the country. Muslims in the Republic of Macedonia follow Sunni Islam of the Hanafi madhhab. Some northwestern and western regions of the country have Muslim majorities. A large majority of all the Muslims in the country are ethnic Albanians, with the rest being primarily Turks, Romani, Bosniaks or Torbeš.

Population[edit]

Ethnicity[edit]

The Šarena Džamija, built in 1438, is a mosque in Tetovo.

Albanian Muslims, forming roughly 25% of the nation's total population and most of the Muslim population, live mostly in the Polog and western regions of the country. The Turks, who make up about 4% of the country's total population, are scattered throughout the country, but mostly in major cities, as are Roma Muslims. Bosniaks are mostly concentrated within Skopje. Muslims of Macedonian ethnicity number roughly 40,000 to 100,000 and can be found in western Macedonia in the Centar Župa, Debar, Struga and Plasnica areas.[3]

Population of Macedonia according to ethnic affiliation in 1981 and 2002
Ethnic group Population 1981 Population 2002
Albanians 377,726[4] 509,083[5]
Turks 86,691[4] 77,959[5]
Romani 43,223[4] 53,879[5]
Macedonian Muslims 39,555[6][7] 2,553[8]
Bosniaks 17,018[5]

Historical population[edit]

The following table shows the Muslim population and percentage for each given year. The Muslim percentage in Macedonia generally decreased from 1904 to 1961 but began to rise again due to high fertility rate among Muslim families, reaching 33.33% in 2002. According to the 2002 Census, 46.5% of the children aged 0–4 were Muslim.[9] In 2010, 39.3% of the population were Muslim.[10][11] However, Islam is predicted to be become the largest religion in the country by 2050, with almost half of the country adhering to the faith. [12]

Year Muslim population Muslim percentage
1904 634,000[13] 36.76%
1912 384,000[13] 33.47%
1921 269,000[13] 31.43%
1948 314,603[13] 27.29%
1953 388,515[13] 29.78%
1961 338,200[13] 24.05%
1971 414,176[13] 25.14%
1981 546,437[13] 28.62%
1991 611,326[13] 30.06%
1994 581,203[13][14] 30.04%
2002 674,015[13][15] 33.33%
2010 808,512 39.3%[16][17]

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.stat.gov.mk/publikacii/knigaX.pdf
  2. ^ BBC - Macedonia
  3. ^ Nielsen, Akgonul & Alibasic 2009, 221.
  4. ^ a b c Ortakovski, Vladimir T. Interethnic Relations and Minorities in the Republic of Macedonia (PDF). Southeast European Politics. 2. pp. 25–45. 
  5. ^ a b c d "Census of Pupulation, Households and Dwellings in the Republic of Macedonia, 2002, p. 591" (PDF). Republic of Macedonia, State Statistical Office,. 2002. Retrieved 20 November 2016. 
  6. ^ Hugh, Poulton (2000). Who Are the Macedonians?. Hurst & Company, London. p. 124. 
  7. ^ Pettifer, James (1999). The new Macedonian Question. Macmillan Press Ltd. p. 115. 
  8. ^ Statistical Yearbook of the Republic of Macedonia, 2014, p. 67, Retrieved 11 December 2016
  9. ^ Census of Pupulation, Households and Dwellings in the Republic of Macedonia, 2002, p. 518
  10. ^ "Religious Composition by Country, 2010-2050" in: Pew Research Center, Retrieved 10 November 2016
  11. ^ Republic of Macedonia, in: Pew-Templeton Global Religious Futures, Retrieved 10 November 2016
  12. ^ http://www.pewforum.org/2015/04/02/religious-projections-2010-2050/
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Kettani, Houssain (2010). "Muslim Population in Europe: 1950 – 2020" (PDF). International Journal of Environmental Science and Development vol. 1, no. 2, p. 156. Retrieved 17 November 2016. 
  14. ^ Coughlin, Kathryn M. (2006). Muslim Cultures Today, A Reference Guide. Greenwood Press, Westport, Connecticut, London. p. 16. 
  15. ^ Census of Pupulation, Households and Dwellings in the Republic of Macedonia, 2002, p. 518
  16. ^ "Religious Composition by Country, 2010-2050" in: Pew Research Center, Retrieved 10 November 2016
  17. ^ Republic of Macedonia, in: Pew-Templeton Global Religious Futures, Retrieved 10 November 2016