Island County, Washington

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Island County
Shoreline at Fort Ebey State Park within U.S. Ebey's Landing National Historical Reserve on Whidbey Island
Map of Washington highlighting Island County
Location within the U.S. state of Washington
Map of the United States highlighting Washington
Washington's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 48°09′N 122°35′W / 48.15°N 122.58°W / 48.15; -122.58
Country United States
State Washington
Founded1852
SeatCoupeville
Largest cityOak Harbor
Area
 • Total517 sq mi (1,340 km2)
 • Land208 sq mi (540 km2)
 • Water309 sq mi (800 km2)  60%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total86,857
 • Estimate 
(2021)
87,432 Increase
 • Density381/sq mi (147/km2)
Time zoneUTC−8 (Pacific)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−7 (PDT)
Congressional district2nd
Websitewww.islandcountywa.gov

Island County is a county located in the U.S. state of Washington. As of the 2020 census, its population was 86,857.[1] Its county seat is Coupeville,[2] while its largest city is Oak Harbor.

The county's name reflects the fact that it is composed entirely of islands.[3] It contains two large islands, Whidbey and Camano, and seven smaller islands (Baby, Ben Ure, Deception, Kalamut, Minor, Smith, and Strawberry). Island County was created out of Thurston County on December 22, 1852, by the legislature of Oregon Territory,[4][5] and is the eighth-oldest county in Washington. It originally encompassed what are now Snohomish, Skagit, Whatcom, and San Juan Counties.

Island County comprises the Oak Harbor, Washington Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the SeattleTacoma, WA Combined Statistical Area.

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 517 square miles (1,340 km2), of which 208 square miles (540 km2) is land and 309 square miles (800 km2) (60%) is water.[6] It is the second smallest county in Washington by land area after San Juan, and second smallest by total area after Wahkiakum.

Geographic features[edit]

National protected areas[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860294
1870626112.9%
18801,08773.6%
18901,78764.4%
19001,8704.6%
19104,704151.6%
19205,48916.7%
19305,369−2.2%
19406,09813.6%
195011,07981.7%
196019,63877.3%
197027,01137.5%
198044,04863.1%
199060,19536.7%
200071,55818.9%
201078,5069.7%
202086,85710.6%
2021 (est.)87,432[7]0.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
1790–1960[9] 1900–1990[10]
1990–2000[11] 2010–2020[1]

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[12] of 2000, there were 71,558 people, 27,784 households, and 20,254 families living in the county. The population density was 343 people per square mile (133/km2). There were 32,378 housing units at an average density of 155 per square mile (60/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 87.2% White, 2.4% Black or African American, 1.0% Native American, 4.2% Asian, 0.4% Pacific Islander, 1.4% from other races, and 3.4% from two or more races. 4.0% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 16.2% were of German, 11.2% English, 9.9% Irish, 7.2% United States or American and 6.0% Norwegian ancestry. 92.5% spoke English, 2.5% Spanish and 2.2% Tagalog as their first language.

There were 27,784 households, out of which 33.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.2% were married couples living together, 7.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.1% were non-families. 21.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 2.93.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 25.5% under the age of 18, 8.5% from 18 to 24, 28.00% from 25 to 44, 23.7% from 45 to 64, and 14.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females, there were 100.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.9 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $45,513, and the median income for a family was $51,363. Males had a median income of $35,331 versus $25,612 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,472. About 5.1% of families and 7.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.8% of those under age 18 and 4.4% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[edit]

As of the 2010 census, there were 78,506 people, 32,746 households, and 22,156 families living in the county.[13] The population density was 376.6 inhabitants per square mile (145.4/km2). There were 40,234 housing units at an average density of 193.0 per square mile (74.5/km2).[14] The racial makeup of the county was 86.1% white, 4.4% Asian, 2.2% black or African American, 0.8% American Indian, 0.5% Pacific islander, 1.5% from other races, and 4.5% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 5.5% of the population.[13] The largest ancestry groups were:[15]

  • 21.4% German
  • 14.3% Irish
  • 14.0% English
  • 6.1% Norwegian
  • 4.5% Scottish
  • 4.3% French
  • 4.1% Dutch
  • 4.0% Swedish
  • 4.0% American
  • 3.6% Mexican
  • 3.5% Italian
  • 2.9% Filipino
  • 2.5% Scotch-Irish
  • 2.1% Polish
  • 1.6% Welsh
  • 1.5% Danish

Of the 32,746 households, 27.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.6% were married couples living together, 7.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 32.3% were non-families, and 25.9% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 2.81. The median age was 43.2 years.[13]

The median income for a household in the county was $57,190 and the median income for a family was $68,106. Males had a median income of $46,801 versus $35,189 for females. The per capita income for the county was $29,079. About 5.7% of families and 8.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.1% of those under age 18 and 4.0% of those age 65 or over.[16]

Transportation[edit]

The primary islands of Island County, Whidbey Island and Camano Island are served by a total of 3 Washington State Routes, those being SR 20 and SR 525 on Whidbey Island, and SR 532 on Camano Island. SR 20 enters Island County via the Port Townsend-Coupeville (Keystone) ferry route from the West, and departs via the Deception Pass Bridge in the North. SR 525 enters Island County from the East/South via the Mukilteo-Clinton ferry and terminates at an intersection with SR 20, South of Coupeville. SR 532 begins on Camano Island at Terry's Corner and departs Island County to the East via the Camano Gateway Bridge.

These islands are also served by a fare-free/pre-paid bus service called Island Transit.

Politics[edit]

Island County is divided in many ways between its north and south. While the north (Oak Harbor) is conservative – Donald Trump received almost 55 percent of the 2016 vote and carried most precincts – most southern and central precincts voted for Hillary Clinton.

The south-central area (Coupeville, Langley) voted over 50 percent for Clinton, just over 30 percent for Trump.[17]

United States presidential election results for Island County, Washington[18]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 22,746 42.18% 29,213 54.17% 1,966 3.65%
2016 18,465 41.71% 20,960 47.34% 4,848 10.95%
2012 19,605 46.27% 21,478 50.69% 1,289 3.04%
2008 19,426 46.07% 22,058 52.31% 680 1.61%
2004 19,754 51.20% 18,216 47.22% 610 1.58%
2000 16,408 49.72% 14,778 44.78% 1,818 5.51%
1996 12,387 43.52% 12,157 42.71% 3,920 13.77%
1992 9,526 35.06% 9,555 35.17% 8,087 29.77%
1988 12,552 58.78% 8,510 39.85% 291 1.36%
1984 13,548 65.72% 6,850 33.23% 218 1.06%
1980 10,926 58.87% 5,422 29.21% 2,211 11.91%
1976 7,804 55.33% 5,859 41.54% 441 3.13%
1972 7,495 68.12% 3,149 28.62% 359 3.26%
1968 4,077 50.96% 3,238 40.48% 685 8.56%
1964 3,044 43.49% 3,946 56.38% 9 0.13%
1960 3,596 59.01% 2,470 40.53% 28 0.46%
1956 3,196 61.20% 2,009 38.47% 17 0.33%
1952 2,901 61.68% 1,772 37.68% 30 0.64%
1948 1,805 49.05% 1,694 46.03% 181 4.92%
1944 1,487 46.66% 1,662 52.15% 38 1.19%
1940 1,371 44.85% 1,626 53.19% 60 1.96%
1936 921 32.74% 1,687 59.97% 205 7.29%
1932 803 30.17% 1,517 56.99% 342 12.85%
1928 1,487 71.25% 556 26.64% 44 2.11%
1924 832 46.25% 114 6.34% 853 47.42%
1920 883 51.19% 285 16.52% 557 32.29%
1916 804 43.58% 855 46.34% 186 10.08%
1912 332 21.11% 310 19.71% 931 59.19%
1908 450 58.21% 192 24.84% 131 16.95%
1904 424 71.99% 83 14.09% 82 13.92%
1900 263 62.62% 123 29.29% 34 8.10%
1896 206 50.86% 191 47.16% 8 1.98%
1892 161 40.66% 127 32.07% 108 27.27%

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Town[edit]

Census-designated places[edit]

Other unincorporated communities[edit]

Juniper Beach, a wedding ceremony locale in past years,[19] has given its name to the Juniper Beach Water District.[20]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 7, 2022.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Government Printing Office. pp. 166.
  4. ^ Reinartz, Kay. "History of King County Government 1853–2002" (PDF). p. 2. Archived from the original (PDF) on March 25, 2009. Retrieved December 30, 2007.
  5. ^ "Washington: Individual County Chronologies". Washington Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2007. Retrieved July 17, 2015.
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved July 5, 2015.
  7. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Counties: April 1, 2020 to July 1, 2021". Retrieved April 7, 2022.
  8. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 7, 2014.
  9. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 7, 2014.
  10. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 7, 2014.
  11. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 26, 2015. Retrieved January 7, 2014.
  12. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  13. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved March 6, 2016.
  14. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 – County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved March 6, 2016.
  15. ^ "DP02 Selected Social Characteristics in the United States – 2006–2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved March 6, 2016.
  16. ^ "DP03 Selected Economic Characteristics – 2006–2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved March 6, 2016.
  17. ^ "November 8, 2016 Island County Election Results" (PDF). Islandcountywa.gov. Archived (PDF) from the original on February 24, 2020.
  18. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved April 6, 2018.
  19. ^ Island County Marriage Register, January-April 1939, paid subscription site accessed October 2017.
  20. ^ Juniper Beach Water District, accessed October 2017

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 48°09′N 122°35′W / 48.15°N 122.58°W / 48.15; -122.58