Isle of Man TT

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"Isle of Man Tourist Trophy" redirects here. For a series of car races held on the Isle of Man between 1905 and 1922, see RAC Tourist Trophy.
Isle of Man TT.svg
Isle of Man Tourist Trophy
Region Isle of Man
Course Snaefell Mountain Course
date 28 May to 10 June 2016
Type Road Course
Clerk of the Course Gary Thompson MBE BEM
Event Organiser ACU Events Ltd
Principal sponsor Isle of Man Department of Economic Development
History
First race 1907
Number of races 97 (through 2016)
First winner Charles R. Collier (1907)
Most wins Joey Dunlop 26 (1977–2000)
Lap record Michael Dunlop 16 minutes 53.929 seconds — 133.962 mph (215.591 km/h) (2016)[1][2]

The International Isle of Man TT (Tourist Trophy) Race [3] is a motorcycle sport event held annually on the Isle of Man in May or June of each year since the inaugural race in 1907. The Isle of Man TT for many years was the most prestigious motorcycle race in the world and also seen as the ultimate test for competitors and machines alike.[4] The Isle of Man TT has been administered by the Auto-Cycle Union (ACU) (previously the Auto-Cycle Club) since 1907 and the Isle of Man TT race organisation is currently managed since 2008 by ACU Events Ltd, a fully owned subsidiary of the ACU.[5] In 2016 the Vision Nine Group was appointed by the Isle of Man Department of Economic Development in a ten-year deal as a race promoter for the 2017 Isle of Man TT onwards. In a profit-sharing arrangement with the private promoter, the Vision Nine Group will invest £2.5 Million in the event and the promoter replacing the previous Isle of Man Department of Economic Development staff and race organisation.[6]

The Isle of Man TT has been traditionally run in a time-trial format on public roads closed for racing by the provisions of an Act of Tynwald (the parliament of the Isle of Man). The event consists of one week of practice sessions followed by one week of racing. It has been a tradition perhaps started by racing competitors in the early 1920s for spectators to tour the Snaefell Mountain Course on motorcycles during the Isle of Man TT on "Mad Sunday,"[7] an informal and unofficial sanctioned event held on the Sunday[8] between 'Practice Week' and 'Race Week.'

The first Isle of Man TT race was held on Tuesday 28 May 1907 and was called the International Auto-Cycle Tourist Trophy.[9] The event was organised by the Auto-Cycle Club over 10 laps of the Isle of Man St John's Short Course of 15 miles 1,470 yards for road-legal 'touring' motorcycles with exhaust silencers, saddles, pedals and mudguards.

From 1911 the Isle of Man TT transferred to the much longer Snaefell Mountain Course of 37.40 miles (current length 37.73 miles). The race programme developed from a single race with two classes for the 1907 Isle of Man TT, expanding in 1911 to two individual races for the 350cc Junior TT motor-cycles and the Blue Riband event the 500cc Senior TT race. The race did not take place from 1915 to 1919 due to the First World War. It resumed in 1920. A 250cc Lightweight TT race was added to the Isle of Man TT programme in 1922 followed by a Sidecar TT race in 1923.

There was no racing on the Isle of Man between 1940 and 1945 due to the Second World War. It recommenced with the Manx Grand Prix in 1946 then the Isle of Man TT in 1947 with a greatly expanded format that included the new Clubman's TT races. The Isle of Man TT became part of the FIM Motor-cycle Grand Prix World Championship as the British round of the World Motor-Cycling Championship during the period 19491976. Following safety concerns with the Snaefell Mountain Course and problems over inadequate 'start-money' for competitors, a boycott of the Isle of Man TT races occurred from the early 1970s by many of the leading competitors, motorcycle manufactures and national motorcycle sporting federations.[10] It is still billed in popular culture as the most dangerous motorsport event in the world, with over 246 fatalities in its history. In 1976, the Isle of Man TT lost its world championship status and was transferred to the United Kingdom by the FIM and run as the British Grand Motor-Cycle Grand Prix for the 1977 season. The Isle of Man TT Races then became an integral part of the new style TT Formula 1, Formula 2 and Formula 3 World Championships between 1977 and 1990 to develop and maintain the international racing status of the Isle of Man TT races.[11] The event was redeveloped by the Isle of Man Department of Tourism as the Isle of Man TT Festival from 1989 onwards. This included new racing events for the new Isle of Man TT Festival programme including the Isle of Man Pre-TT Classic Races in 1989 followed by the Isle of Man Post-TT Races from 1991 and both held on the Billown Circuit. In 2013, the Isle of Man Classic TT was developed by the Isle of Man Department of Economic Development and the Auto-Cycle Union for historic racing motorcycles and along with the Manx Grand Prix now forms part of the 'Isle of Man Festival of Motorcycling' now held in late August of each year.

Early Isle of Man TT race history (1904–1910)[edit]

Gordon Bennett and Tourist Trophy car races[edit]

Motor racing began on the Isle of Man in 1904 with the Gordon Bennett Eliminating Trial, restricted to touring automobiles. As the Motor Car Act 1903 placed a speed restriction of 20 mph (32 km/h) on automobiles in the UK, Julian Orde, Secretary of the Automobile Car Club of Britain and Ireland approached the authorities in the Isle of Man for the permission to race automobiles on the island's public roads.[12] The Highways (Light Locomotive) Act 1904 gave permission in the Isle of Man for the 52.15-mile (83.93 km) Highlands Course for the 1904 Gordon Bennett Eliminating Trial which was won by Clifford Earl (Napier) in 7 hours 26.5 minutes for five laps (255.5 mi or 411.2 km) of the Highlands Course. The 1905 Gordon Bennett Trial was held on 30 May 1905 and was again won by Clifford Earl driving a Napier automobile in 6 hours and 6 minutes for six laps of the Highland Course. This was followed in September 1905 with the first Isle of Man Tourist Trophy Race for racing automobiles, now known as the RAC Tourist Trophy and was won by John Napier (Arrol-Johnston) in 6 hours and 9 minutes at an average speed of 33.90 mph (54.56 km/h).[13]

International Motor-Cycle Cup Race (1905)[edit]

For the 1905 Gordon Bennett Eliminating Trial it was decided to run an eliminating trial for motorcycles the day after for a team to represent Great Britain in the International Motor-Cycle Cup Races. An accident at Ramsey Hairpin forced out one of the pre-race favourites and the inability of the motorcycle competitors to climb the steep Mountain Section of the course forced the organisers to use a 25-mile (40 km) section of the Gordon Bennett Trial course. This ran from Douglas south to Castletown and then north to Ballacraine along the primary A3 road and returned to the start at the Quarterbridge in Douglas via Crosby and Glen Vine along the current Snaefell Mountain Course in the reverse direction. The 1905 International Motor-Cycle Cup Race for five laps (125 mi or 201 km) was won by J.S. Campbell (Ariel) despite a fire during a pit stop[14] in 4 hours, 9 minutes and 36 seconds at an average race speed of 30.04 mph (48.34 km/h).[15]

Format of the races[edit]

Competitors line up at the start of the 2010 Senior TT race

The TT Races since the first race in 1907 have been in the format of time-trial. The races held on the Clypse Course during the period 1954-1959 were the more traditional full grid starts along with the 1924 Lightweight TT Race and Clubmen TT Races from 1948, which were also "mass-start" races. The current format is a "clutch start" and race competitors will be "started singly at 10 second intervals".[16]

Race procedure[edit]

  • Start Preliminaries
    • First Signal – 45 minutes before the start with a warm-up of engines in the Race Paddock and assembly area.
    • Second Signal – 30 minutes before start.
    • Third Signal – 15 minutes before start, race competitors move to the start-line and form-up in qualification order.
    • Fourth Signal – 5 minutes before start, signal to clear the grid and race competitors move towards the exit-gate.

Eligibility[edit]

Entrants must be in possession of a valid National Entrants or FIM Sponsors Licence for Road Racing.

Race classes[edit]

Superbike TT[edit]

The 2015 specification for entries into the Superbike TT race are defined as:

  • Any machine complying with the following specifications:
    • TT Superbike: (Machines complying with the 2015 FIM Superbike Championship specifications)
      • Over 750 cc up to 1000 cc 4 cylinders 4-stroke
      • Over 750 cc up to 1000 cc 3 cylinders 4-stroke
      • Over 850 cc up to 1200 cc 2 cylinders 4-stroke

Minimum Weight 165 kg (364 lb). Other machines admitted at the discretion of the Organisers [17]

Supersport TT[edit]

The 1911 Isle of Man TT was the first time the Junior TT race took place, open to 300 cc single-cylinder and 340 cc twin cylinder motorcycles, contested over five laps of the new 37.5-mile (60.4 km) Snaefell Mountain Course. The first event on the new course was the Junior TT Race contested by 35 entrants, won by Percy J. Evans riding a Humber motor-cycle at an average race speed of 41.45 mph (66.71 km/h). The 1912 event was the first to limit the Junior TT to only 350 cc machines and this engine capacity prevailed until 1994 when replaced by the 600 cc Supersport class.

  • 1911 For single cylinder motorcycles not exceeding 300 cc engine capacity and 340 cc twin cylinder motorcycles.
  • 1912–1948 For motorcycles not exceeding 350 cc engine capacity.
  • 1949–1953 FIM World Championship event for motorcycles not exceeding 350 cc engine capacity and held on the Snaefell mountain course.
  • 1954–1959 FIM World Championship event for motorcycles not exceeding 350 cc engine capacity and held on the Clypse Course.
  • 1960–1976 FIM World Championship event for motorcycles not exceeding 350 cc engine capacity and held on the Mountain Course.
  • 1977–1993 for motorcycles not exceeding 350 cc engine capacity and held on the Mountain Course.
  • 1994 onwards for motorcycles not exceeding 600 cc engine capacity and held on the Mountain Course.

The 2015 specifications for entries into the Supersport TT race are:

  • Over 400 cc up to 600 cc 4 cylinders 4-stroke
  • Over 600 cc up to 750 cc 2 cylinders 4-stroke
  • Over 600 cc up to 675 cc 3 cylinders 4-stroke

Minimum Weight 161 kg[18]

Superstock TT[edit]

Main article: Superstock TT

The 2015 specifications for entries for the Superstock TT, an event for production based motorcycles racing with treaded road tyres, are based on the FIM Superstock Championship specifications, as follows:

  • Superstock TT: (Machines complying with the 2012 FIM Superstock Championship specifications)
    • Over 750 cc up to 1000 cc 4 cylinders 4-stroke
    • Over 750 cc up to 1000 cc 3 cylinders 4-stroke
    • Over 850 cc up to 1200 cc 2 cylinders 4-stroke

Minimum (Dry) Weight 170 kg[19]

Lightweight TT[edit]

Main article: Lightweight TT
Winner of the 2012 Lightweight TT Ryan Farquhar 650 cc Kawasaki, (2) at the startline

The 1922 event was the first time the Lightweight TT race took place, won by a motorcycle-journalist Geoff S. Davison, riding a Levis at an average speed of 49.89 mph (80.29 km/h) for seven laps of the Snaefell Mountain Course. As with the Ultra-Lightweight TT Race, the event was dropped from the race schedule in 2004, but was reintroduced 2008-2009, held on the Billown short road circuit and then dropped again from the race schedule on cost grounds.

  • 1924–1948 For motorcycles not exceeding 250 cc engine capacity.
  • 1949–1953 FIM World Championship event for motorcycles not exceeding 250 cc engine capacity, held on the Snaefell mountain course.
  • 1954–1959 FIM World Championship event for motorcycles not exceeding 250 cc engine capacity, held on the Clypse Course.
  • 1960–1976 FIM World Championship event for motorcycles not exceeding 250 cc engine capacity, held on the Mountain Course.
  • 1977–2004 for motorcycles not exceeding 250 cc engine capacity, held on the Mountain Course.
  • 2008–2009 for motorcycles not exceeding 250 cc engine capacity, held on the Billown Circuit.
  • 2012– The event was re-introduced from the 2012 event for water-cooled four-stroke twin cylinder not exceeding a capacity of 650 cc and complying with the ACU Standing Regulations.[20]

The 2015 specifications for entries into the Lightweight TT race are:

  • Machines must comply with general technical rules as per ACU Standing Regulations and 2015 IOM TT regulations.
    • Any four-stroke twin cylinder motorcycle originally sold for road use with a water-cooled engine of up to 650 cc engine capacity.
    • Eligible machines must be from models homologated[clarification needed] for road use 2006 or later.[21]

Sidecar TT[edit]

Main article: Sidecar TT
Sidecar TT race competitors line up to start the race

The 1923 TT was the first time the Sidecar TT race was run, over three laps (113 mi or 182 km) of the Mountain Course and was won by Freddie Dixon and passenger Walter Perry with a Douglas and special banking-sidecar at an average race speed of 53.15 mph (85.54 km/h). For the 1926 event the Sidecar and Ultra-Lightweight TT classes were dropped due to lack of entries.

The Sidecar race was re-introduced from the 1954 event for Sidecars not exceeding 500 cc engine capacity, run on the Clypse Course. A non-championship 750 cc class for sidecars was introduced at the 1968 event. For the 1976 event the race was held over two-legs. From 1975, the previous 500 cc and 750 cc classes for Sidecars were replaced by a 1000 cc engine capacity class.


The new FIM Formula 2 class for Sidecars was introduced for the 1990 Isle of Man TT.

  • 1954–1959 FIM World Championship Event for Side-Cars not exceeding 500 cc engine capacity. Race held on the Clypse Course.
  • 1960–1976 FIM World Championship Event held on Mountain Course.
  • 1968–1974 Non-Championship event for Sidecars not exceeding 750 cc.
  • 1975–1989 Sidecars not exceeding 1000 cc engine capacity.
  • 1990– FIM Formula 2 Sidecar race for two-stroke engines not exceeding 350 cc or four-stroke engines not exceeding 600 cc.

The 2015 specifications for entries into the Sidecar TT race are:

  • Machines must comply with general technical rules as per ACU Standing Regulations and 2015 Isle of Man TT regulations.
    • Engine Types
      • 501 – 600 cc, 4 stroke, 4 cylinder, Production based motorcycle engines.

Senior TT[edit]

Main article: Senior TT
Ian Hutchinson on the start-line of the Senior TT Race on 11 June 2010

For the 1911 Isle of Man TT, the first TT event using the Snaefell Mountain Course or Mountain Course, two separate races were introduced. The first event was a four lap Junior TT race and a separate Senior TT race for 500 cc single-cylinder and 585 cc twin-cylinder motorcycles, over five laps of the new 37.5-mile (60.4 km) Snaefell Mountain Course. The new technical challenges of the Mountain Course forced changes on entrants and motorcycle manufacturers alike. The American Indian motorcycle factory fitted a two-speed gearbox and chain-drive. This proved to be the winning combination when Oliver Godfrey won the 1911 Senior TT race riding an Indian at an average speed of 47.63 mph (76.65 km/h). Fitted with an obsolete six-speed belt drive,[clarification needed] Charlie Collier riding a Matchless motorcycle finished second in the 1911 Senior TT race and was later disqualified for illegal refuelling. During an early morning practice session for the 1911 Isle of Man TT races, Victor Surridge died after crashing his Rudge motorcycle at Glen Helen, the first death of a competitor on the Snaefell Mountain Course and the first death in the Isle of Man of a person in an automotive accident.[22]

  • 1911 For single cylinder motorcycles not exceeding 500 cc engine capacity and 585 cc twin cylinder motorcycles.
  • 1912–1939 For motorcycles not exceeding 500 cc engine capacity.
  • 1947–1948 For motorcycles not exceeding 500 cc engine capacity and a ban on engine supercharging.
  • 1949–1976 FIM World Championship event for motorcycles not exceeding 500 cc engine capacity.
  • 1977–1984 for motorcycles not exceeding 500 cc engine capacity.
  • 1985–2004 for motorcycles complying with ACU TT Formula 1 rules not exceeding 1,010 cc engine capacity.
  • 2004 onwards for motorcycles complying with ACU/FIM Superbike rules not exceeding 1,000 cc engine capacity.

The 2015 specifications for entries into the Senior TT race are:

  • TT Superbike: (Machines complying with the 2015 FIM Superbike Championship specifications)[23]
    • Over 750 cc up to 1000 cc 4 cylinders 4-stroke
    • Over 750 cc up to 1000 cc 3 cylinders 4-stroke
    • Over 850 cc up to 1200 cc 2 cylinders 4-stroke
  • Supersport Junior TT (without limitation of tyre choice)
    • TT Superstock (without limitation of tyre choice)
    • Other machines admitted at the discretion of the Organisers.

TT Zero[edit]

Main article: TT Zero

Starting from the 2010 races, the TT Zero event over one lap (37.73 mi or 60.72 km) of the Snaefell Mountain Course replaced the TTXGP. The TT Zero event as an officially sanctioned TT race is for racing motorcycles where "The technical concept is for motorcycles (two wheeled) to be powered without the use of carbon based fuels and have zero toxic/noxious emissions".[24] The Isle of Man Government offered a prize of £10,000 for the first entrant to exceed the prestigious 100 mph (160 km/h) (22 minutes and 38.388 seconds) average speed around the Mountain Course. This was achieved by Michael Rutter of team MotoCzysz in the 2012 race,[25] and has been exceeded every year since.

Discontinued race classes[edit]

Ultra-Lightweight TT[edit]

Main article: Ultra-Lightweight TT

1924 was the first time the Ultra-Lightweight TT race took place for motorcycles not exceeding 175 cc engine capacity. It was won by Jack Porter, riding a New Imperial motorcycle at an average speed of 51.21 mph (82.41 km/h) over three laps of the Snaefell mountain course. The Ultra-Lightweight class was re-introduced in 1951 for motorcycles not exceeding 125 cc until discontinued in 1974, and then re-introduced for 1989, again for two-stroke 125 cc motorcycles, until dropped again due to lack of entries after 2004. The event was reintroduced 2008-2009 held on the four-mile Billown Circuit and then dropped from the race schedule on cost grounds for the 2010 races.

  • 1924–1925 For motorcycles not exceeding 175 cc engine capacity.
  • 1951–1953 FIM World Championship event for motorcycles not exceeding 125 cc engine capacity, held on the Snaefell mountain course.
  • 1954–1959 FIM World Championship event for motorcycles not exceeding 125 cc engine capacity, held on the Clypse Course.
  • 1960–1974 FIM World Championship event for motorcycles not exceeding 125 cc engine capacity, held on the Mountain Course.
  • 1989–2004 for motorcycles not exceeding 125 cc engine capacity, held on the Mountain Course.
  • 2008–2009 for motorcycles not exceeding 125 cc engine capacity, held on the Billown Circuit.
  • 50 cc race 1962–1968, an additional World Championship event for Ultra-Lightweight motorcycles not exceeding 50 cc engine capacity, held on the Mountain Course.

Clubman TT and Production TT[edit]

The Clubman races with Lightweight, Junior and Senior classes were held for production motorcycles from 1947 until 1956.[26] A Senior 1000 cc class provided an opportunity for Vincent motorcycles.[27] The riders were little-known, but as the stars were barred from entering the class, it provided a stepping-stone for future-stars but resulted in less spectator-interest. The series became dominated by one model — the BSA Gold Star,[28][29][30] and with little competition from other manufacturers, was discontinued. When previewing the impending re-introduction of a specification-controlled, roadster-based class in March, 1967, David Dixon wrote: "lack of inter-make rivalry probably put the final nail in the coffin".[28]

Writing in UK monthly magazine Motor Cyclist Illustrated, racing journalist Ray Knight, who had achieved a lap speed of nearly 88 mph on a Triumph Tiger 100 roadster-based racing motorcycle in the Manx Grand Prix,[31][32][33] commented in early 1965 that the ACU had refused a request from manufacturers to run a production TT race, which he thought was a missed opportunity, particularly considering the dwindling support for the 50 cc race.[34]

A Production TT for roadster-based motorcycles having classes for maximum engine capacities of 250 cc, 500 cc and 750 cc was introduced from 1967 until 1976 when the class was discontinued.

The Production TT was reintroduced for the 1984 races in three classes, reduced to two classes on safety grounds for the 1990 races. For the 2005 races the Superstock class replaced the previous 1000 cc & 600 cc Production TT classes that had been part of the race schedule since 1989.

Practice sessions[edit]

2013 TT start of the Newcomers Speed Control Lap with John McGuinness (left) and Bruce Anstey (right)

At the TT races there is usually one week of practice and one week of racing. Historically there was an early morning practice session from 05:00-07:30 am but this was discontinued from the 2004 races. During an early morning practice at the 1927 Isle of Man TT, Archie Birkin, brother of Tim Birkin of the Bentley Boys, was killed at Rhencullen. From 1928 practice sessions for the Isle of Man TT Races and Manx Grand Prix were held on closed roads. Evening practice sessions were introduced for the 1937 Isle of Man TT and continue to this day. The Thursday afternoon practice session from 13:45-17:00, introduced in the late 1950s, was discontinued from the Centenary races in 2007.

A schedule for practice sessions is announced each year well in advance. For the 2016 races a provisional schedule was announced by mid-July 2015,[35] and changes in the schedule were highlighted.[36]

But for example, the 2015 event began with a Saturday evening untimed practice session from 18:00 - 21:30, with the public roads that comprise the Snaefell Mountain Course closed. The section of the primary A18 Snaefell Mountain Road from Ramsey Hairpin to Creg-ny-Baa was to close at 16:45 for the practice periods (from 17:00 hours from the Bungalow), 1 hour and 15 minutes before the rest of the course.[37]

The first practice session in 2015 was to provide four controlled laps for newcomers, two for new Solo competitors and two for new Sidecar competitors. Competitors would be escorted for one lap of the Mountain Course by the Travelling Marshals at a steady pace and accompanied by experienced Isle of Man TT and/or Manx Grand Prix competitors.

The schedule for the first Saturday untimed session in 2015 was:

18:20 – 18:45 Solo Motor-Cycles Newcomers Speed Control Lap
18:35 – 19:00 Sidecar Newcomers' Control Lap
18:50 – 19:50 Lightweight TT / Newcomers (all solo classes)
19:55 – 20:50 Sidecar practice session.

Practice week sessions[edit]

The main practice and timed practice sessions are usually held on Monday-Friday of the next week. The public roads forming the Mountain Course were to be closed in 2015 between 18:00 – 21:30 for the Solo and Sidecar classes. Some would-be racers need to qualify for races by achieving satisfactory practice times during these sessions.

Schedule for the five-day timed session Monday-Friday of practice week in 2015:

18:20 – 19:55 Solo Motor-Cycles timed practice session.
20:00 – 20:50 Sidecar timed practice session.

Race week practice sessions[edit]

Further scheduled timed practice sessions after the race periods for the 2015 Isle of Man TT Races:

Saturday 6 June:

16:40 – 17:40 Solo Motor-Cycles timed practice session.

Mad Sunday, 7 June: No practice sessions were scheduled during "Mad Sunday", a day when many fans ride the TT course themselves. An exception to this non-scheduling was in 2013 when there was racing on the afternoon of Mad Sunday. In 2013, Inspector Derek Flint said: "Even though the benefits of the mountain being one way are in place for the entire two weeks these days, Mad Sunday is traditionally a time for that little bit of extra exuberance, which creates us problems when people run out of skill, then run out of road". Police are out in force, and in 2013 large numbers of fans were expected to ride due to very favourable weather forecasts.[38]

Monday 8 June:

12:30 – 13:00 Sidecar timed practice session.

Wednesday 10 June:

15:50 – 16:45 Solo Motor-Cycles timed practice session for the 2015 Isle of Man TT Races.

Practice TT Zero[edit]

2012 TT Zero race - Mark Miller Motoczysz (2) followed by John McGuinness (3) at Parliament Square, Ramsey

Schedule for the TT Zero Challenge timed sessions in 2015 was:

Friday 5 June 20:30 – 20:50

Saturday 6 June 17:45 – 18:30

Monday 8 June 16:00 – 16:30

In the event of inclement weather either delaying or leading to the cancellation of one or more timed practice sessions, a reserve morning session could be held with the public roads closed 06:00 – 07:30 on the Mountain Course. Further untimed practice sessions are held during race week after the racing has been completed for selected race classes.

Race schedule[edit]

In 2015 there were four scheduled race days:

Saturday 6 June:

11:00 Superbike Race, 6 laps (236.38 mi or 380.42 km)
14:00 Sidecar Race 1, 3 laps (113.00 mi or 181.86 km)

Monday 8 June:

10:45 Supersport Race 1, 4 laps (150.92 mi or 242.88 km)
14:00 Superstock Race, 4 laps (150.92 mi or 242.88 km)

Wednesday 10 June:

10:45 TT Zero Challenge Race, 1 lap (37.73 mi or 60.72 km)
12:00 Supersport TT Race 2, 4 laps (150.92 mi or 242.88 km)
14:30 Sidecar Race 2, 3 laps (113.00 mi or 181.86 km)

Friday 12 June:

10:15 Lightweight TT Race, 3 laps (113.00 mi or 181.86 km)
13:00 Senior TT Race, 6 laps (236.38 mi or 380.42 km)

The section of the primary A18 Snaefell Mountain Road from Ramsey Hairpin (Barrule Park, Ramsey) to Creg-ny-Baa was to close for the race periods 45 minutes before the rest of the course (30 minutes from the Bungalow).[39]

TT course official vehicles[edit]

After the completion of a practice or race period, an official course vehicle displaying the notice Roads Open proceeds around the Mountain Course, passing each point opening the roads including side-access junctions to public use. On the Snaefell Mountain Road section from Ramsey to Douglas, the official vehicle displays the notice Roads Open One Way.

Crossing places during practice and races[edit]

The 1982 Road Racing Act (Isle of Man) and the supplementary TT Road Races Orders allow vehicles and pedestrians to cross the Snaefell Mountain Course at certain points between scheduled race periods under the supervision of a police officer. Several permanent pedestrian overbridges have been erected. These points include:

In Douglas[edit]

Elsewhere[edit]

  • A1 Douglas to Peel road with the A23 Eyreton Road and the B36 Old Church Road, Crosby
  • A3 Castletown to Ramsey road junction with B10 Sartfield Road and the Ballaleigh Road at Barregarrow Crossroads, Michael
  • A3 junction with A10 Station Road and C37 Ballaugh Glen Road at Ballaugh Bridge
  • A3 junction with A14 Sandygate Road and A14 Tholt-y-Will Glen Road at Sulby Crossroads
  • A2 Albert Square and Princes Road, Ramsey at the junction with A18 Snaefell Mountain Road, close to May Hill

TT Course access road[edit]

Part of the access road passing under the A1 Peel Road

The TT Access Road runs parallel to a section of the A1 Peel Road, which is part of the Snaefell Mountain Course, and operates during practice and race periods to enable vehicles to pass from inside of the race course to the outside. It runs along a section of former railway line on the historic Douglas to Peel route, from the junction of the A5 New Castletown Road at the Quarter Bridge, passing under the course at Braddan Bridge, to an exit at Braddan School Road in Douglas outskirts, near the former Braddan Railway Halt and the A23/Ballafletcher Road junction. The access road is a narrow, single-track width with passing places and is restricted to cars and light vans below a weight limit of 3,500 kilograms (3.4 long tons; 3.9 short tons). When used for vehicular traffic, pedestrian access is prohibited, but at other times it is part of a system of nature-trails.[40][41]

Description[edit]

The Oxford Companion to World Sports and Games notes:

The oldest motor-cycle racing circuit still in use is the Snaefell Mountain Course over which the Isle of Man Tourist Trophy races are run. Starting at the town of Douglas on the south-east coast, the course takes a wide sweep to the west and north to enter the town of Ramsey on the north-east coast and thence return to the starting point, each lap measuring 3734 miles (60.7 km) and taking in over 200 bends while climbing from sea level to an altitude of over 1,300 ft (396 m). This circuit is the epitome of the natural road course, all the roads used being ordinary public highways closed for the racing and practice sessions.[42]

During race week, the TT races create a carnival atmosphere with picnicking spectators flanking vantage points on the circuit similar to other community festivals in another form of cycle racing — the Tour de Yorkshire and Le Tour de France.

Safety and danger[edit]

Between 1907 and 2015 there have been 246 fatalities of which 141 were competitors during official practices or races for the Isle of Man TT Races.[43]

Total overall race winners[edit]

Rider Wins
Joey Dunlop 26
John McGuinness 23
Dave Molyneux 17
Mike Hailwood, Ian Hutchinson 14
Michael Dunlop 13
Bruce Anstey, Steve Hislop, Phillip McCallen 11
Giacomo Agostini, Robert Fisher, Ian Lougher, Stanley Woods 10
Mick Boddice, David Jefferies, Siegfried Schauzu 9
Jim Moodie, Chas Mortimer, Phil Read, Charlie Williams 8
Mick Grant, Tony Rutter 7
Geoff Duke, Jimmie Guthrie, Jim Redman, John Surtees 6
Alec Bennett, Nick Crowe, Brian Reid, Robert Dunlop, Carlo Ubbiali 5
Ben Birchall, Klaus Enders, Freddie Frith, Wal Handley, Trevor Ireson, Dave Leach, Ray Pickrell, Tarquinio Provini, Michael Rutter, Bill Smith, Jock Taylor, John Williams 4
Adrian Archibald, Ray Amm, Simon Beck, Graeme Crosby, Max Deubel, Harold Daniell, Carl Fogarty, Alex George, Tom Herron, Alan Jackson, Ryan Farquhar, Tony Jefferies, Klaus Klaffenböck, Dave Leech, Rob McElnea, Bob McIntyre, Phil Mellor, Dave Morris, Chris Palmer, Walter Schneider, Ian Simpson, Darren Carguillo, Rolf Steinhausen, Luigi Taveri, Barry Woodland 3
Fergus Anderson, Hugh Anderson, Manliff Barrington, Artie Bell, Geoff Bell, Lowry Burton, Kel Carruthers, Charlie Collier, Steve Cull, Howard R Davies, Freddie Dixon, Charlie Dodson, Cameron Donald, Iain Duffus, Marc Flynn, Dick Greasley, Shaun Harris, John Hartle, Fritz Hillebrand, Gary Hocking, John Holden, Tim Hunt, Bill Ivy, Gary Johnson, Alistair King, Con Law, Eddie Laycock, Ivan Lintin, Bill Lomas, Graeme McGregor, Brian Morrison, Trevor Nation, Gary Padgett, Cecil Sandford, Dave Saville, Tom Sheard, Edwin Twemlow, Nigel Piercy, Steve Plater, Jock Porter, Malcolm Uphill, Eric Williams, Paul Williams 2
Steve Abbott, Dario Ambrosini, Frank A Applebee, Ivor Arber, Reg Armstrong, Georg Auerbacher, Mark Baldwin, W.H. Bashall, Ian Bell, Dieter Braun, Eric Briggs, Norman Brown, Ralph Bryans, Jimmy Buchan, Trevor Burgess, Roger Burnett, Florian Camathias, Maurice Cann, Phil Carpenter, Shannon Carpenter, Phil Carter, Harold Clark, Rod Coleman, Harry A Collier, Syd Crabtree, Dave Croxford, J.D. Daniels, Leo Davenport, G.S. Davison, Steve Day, Tommy de la Hay, Ernst Degner, Eddie Dow, P.J. Evans, Helmut Fath, Jack Findlay, Rem Fowler, Sid Gleave, Oliver Godfrey, Les Graham, Stuart Graham, Werner Haas, Conrad Harrison, Dean Harrison, Ron Haslam, R.J. Hazlehurst, F.G. Hicks, James Hillier, Mac Hobson, Bill Hodgson, Robert Holden, Rupert Hollaus, Colin Hopper, Clive Horton, Eric Housley, Dennis Ireland, Mitsuo Itoh, Brian Jackson, Nick Jefferies, C. W. Johnston, Ken Kavanagh, Bob Keeler, Neil Kelly, Ewald Kluge, Ray Knight, David Lashmar, Monty V. Lockwood, Frank Longman, Heinz Luthringshauser, Jack Marshall, Keith Martin, Hugh Mason, Cromie McCandless, Bill McVeigh, Georg Meier, Ted Mellors, Mark Miller, Derek Minter, George O'Dell, Eric Oliver, Mat Oxley, Les Parker, Denis Parkinson, Graham Penny, A. Phillips, Derek Powell, Cliff Pritchard, Cyril Pullin, Brian Purslow, Richard Quayle, Johnny Rea, Tim Reeves, Harry Reed, Tommy Robb, Brett Richmond, Tony Rogers, Nigel Rollason, Dave Roper, Fritz Scheidegger, Martyn Sharpe, Dave Simmonds, Bill Simpson, Jimmie Simpson, Barry Smith, Omobono Tenni, Steve Tonkin, G.H. Tucker, Kenneth Twemlow, Henry Tyrell-Smith, Chris Vincent, Terry Vinicombe, Graham Walker, Frank Whiteway, Cyril Williams, Peter Williams, Stan Wood, T.L. Wood 1

FIM Championship Rounds (1949–1976)[edit]

The Isle of Man TT was part of the FIM Motor-Cycle Grand Prix World Championship (now MotoGP) between 1949 and 1976. During this period the Isle of Man TT Races counted as the United Kingdom round including the Sidecar TT, 50 cc Ultra-Lightweight TT, 125 cc Lightweight TT, 250 cc Lightweight TT, 350 cc Junior TT and 500 cc Senior TT races counted towards the FIM Motor-Cycle Grand Prix World Championship.

Year 50 cc (Ultra-Lightweight TT) 125 cc (Lightweight TT) 250 cc (Lightweight TT) 350 cc (Junior TT) 500 cc (Senior TT) Report
Rider Manufacturer Rider Manufacturer Rider Manufacturer Rider Manufacturer Rider Manufacturer
1976 United Kingdom Tom Herron Yamaha United Kingdom Chas Mortimer Yamaha United Kingdom Tom Herron Yamaha Report
1975 United Kingdom Chas Mortimer Yamaha United Kingdom Charlie Williams Yamaha United Kingdom Mick Grant Kawasaki Report
1974 United Kingdom Charlie Williams Yamaha United Kingdom Tony Rutter Yamaha United Kingdom Phil Carpenter Yamaha Report
1973 United Kingdom Tommy Robb Yamaha United Kingdom Charlie Williams Yamaha United Kingdom Tony Rutter Yamaha Australia Jack Findlay Suzuki Report
1972 United Kingdom Chas Mortimer Yamaha United Kingdom Phil Read Yamaha Italy Giacomo Agostini MV Agusta Italy Giacomo Agostini MV Agusta Report
1971 United Kingdom Chas Mortimer Yamaha United Kingdom Phil Read Yamaha United Kingdom Tony Jefferies Yamsel Italy Giacomo Agostini MV Agusta Report
1970 Germany Dieter Braun Suzuki Australia Kel Carruthers Yamaha Italy Giacomo Agostini MV Agusta Italy Giacomo Agostini MV Agusta Report
1969 United Kingdom Dave Simmonds Kawasaki Australia Kel Carruthers Benelli Italy Giacomo Agostini MV Agusta Italy Giacomo Agostini MV Agusta Report
1968 Australia Barry Smith Derbi United Kingdom Phil Read Yamaha United Kingdom Bill Ivy Yamaha Italy Giacomo Agostini MV Agusta Italy Giacomo Agostini MV Agusta Report
1967 United Kingdom Stuart Graham Suzuki United Kingdom Phil Read Yamaha United Kingdom Mike Hailwood Honda United Kingdom Mike Hailwood Honda United Kingdom Mike Hailwood Honda Report
1966 United Kingdom Ralph Bryans Honda United Kingdom Bill Ivy Yamaha United Kingdom Mike Hailwood Honda Italy Giacomo Agostini MV Agusta United Kingdom Mike Hailwood Honda Report
1965 Switzerland Luigi Taveri Honda United Kingdom Phil Read Yamaha Rhodesia Jim Redman Honda Rhodesia Jim Redman Honda United Kingdom Mike Hailwood MV Agusta Report
1964 New Zealand Hugh Anderson Suzuki Switzerland Luigi Taveri Honda Rhodesia Jim Redman Honda Rhodesia Jim Redman Honda United Kingdom Mike Hailwood MV Agusta Report
1963 Japan Mitsuo Itoh Suzuki New Zealand Hugh Anderson Suzuki Rhodesia Jim Redman Honda Rhodesia Jim Redman Honda United Kingdom Mike Hailwood MV Agusta Report
1962 Germany Ernst Degner Suzuki Switzerland Luigi Taveri Honda United Kingdom Derek Minter Honda United Kingdom Mike Hailwood MV Agusta Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland Gary Hocking MV Agusta Report
1961 United Kingdom Mike Hailwood Honda United Kingdom Mike Hailwood Honda United Kingdom Phil Read Norton United Kingdom Mike Hailwood Norton Report
1960 Italy Carlo Ubbiali MV Agusta Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland Gary Hocking MV Agusta United Kingdom John Hartle MV Agusta United Kingdom John Surtees MV Agusta Report
1959 Italy Tarquinio Provini MV Agusta Italy Tarquinio Provini MV Agusta United Kingdom John Surtees MV Agusta United Kingdom John Surtees MV Agusta Report
1958 Italy Carlo Ubbiali MV Agusta Italy Tarquinio Provini MV Agusta United Kingdom John Surtees MV Agusta United Kingdom John Surtees MV Agusta Report
1957 Italy Tarquinio Provini Mondial United Kingdom Cecil Sandford Mondial United Kingdom Bob McIntyre Gilera United Kingdom Bob McIntyre Gilera Report
1956 Italy Carlo Ubbiali MV Agusta Italy Carlo Ubbiali MV Agusta Australia Ken Kavanagh Moto Guzzi United Kingdom John Surtees MV Agusta Report
1955 Italy Carlo Ubbiali MV Agusta United Kingdom Bill Lomas Moto Guzzi United Kingdom Bill Lomas Moto Guzzi United Kingdom Geoff Duke Gilera Report
1954 Austria Rupert Hollaus NSU Germany Werner Haas NSU New Zealand Rod Coleman AJS Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland Ray Amm Norton Report
1953 United Kingdom Leslie Graham MV Agusta United Kingdom Fergus Anderson Moto Guzzi Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland Ray Amm Norton Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland Ray Amm Norton Report
1952 United Kingdom Cecil Sandford MV Agusta United Kingdom Fergus Anderson Moto Guzzi United Kingdom Geoff Duke Norton Republic of Ireland Reg Armstrong Norton Report
1951 United Kingdom Cromie McCandless Mondial United Kingdom Tommy Wood Moto Guzzi United Kingdom Geoff Duke Norton United Kingdom Geoff Duke Norton Report
1950 Italy Dario Ambrosini Benelli United Kingdom Artie Bell Norton United Kingdom Geoff Duke Norton Report
1949 Republic of Ireland Manliff Barrington Moto Guzzi United Kingdom Freddie Frith Velocette United Kingdom Harold Daniell Norton Report

Current lap records[edit]

Category Rider(s) Machine Tyres Year Time Average speed Source[44]
mph km/h
Outright (all categories) Michael Dunlop BMW S1000RR Dunlop 2016 16:53.929 133.962 215.591 [1][2]
Superbike TT Michael Dunlop BMW S1000RR Dunlop 2016 16:58.254 133.393 214.675 [45][46]
Supersport TT Michael Dunlop Honda CBR600RR Dunlop 2013 17:35.659 128.666 207.068
Lightweight TT James Hillier Kawasaki ER650 Metzeler 2015 18:43.955 120.848 194.486 [citation needed]
Ultra-Lightweight TT Chris Palmer Honda RS125 2004 20:20.87 110.52 177.86
Senior TT Michael Dunlop BMW S1000RR Dunlop 2016 16:53.929 133.962 215.591 [1][2]
Superstock TT Ian Hutchinson BMW S1000RR Metzeler 2016 17:00.510 133.098 214.200 [47][48]
TT Zero John McGuinness Mugen Shinden Dunlop 2015 18:58.743 119.279 191.961 [citation needed]
Sidecar TT Ben Birchall and
Tom Birchall
LCR Honda 600 Sidecar Avon 2016 19:22.928 116.798 187.968 [49][50]

Current race records[edit]

Category Rider(s) Machine Tyres Year Race time Average speed
mph km/h
Superbike TT (6 laps) Michael Dunlop BMW S1000RR Dunlop 2016 01:44:14.259 130.306 209.707[45][46]
Supersport TT (4 laps) Ian Hutchinson Yamaha YZF-R6 Metzeler 2016 01:11:36.808 126.445 203.494[51][52]
Lightweight TT (4 laps) Ivan Lintin Kawasaki ER650 Metzeler 2016 01:16:26.681 118.454 190.633[53]
Lightweight TT (3 laps) Ivan Lintin Kawasaki ER650 Metzeler 2015 57:06.070 118.936 191.409[54]
Senior TT (6 laps) Michael Dunlop BMW S1000RR Dunlop 2016 01:43:56.129 130.685 210.317[1][2]
Senior TT (4 laps) John McGuinness Honda CBR1000RR Dunlop 2015 01:09:23.903 130.481 209.989
Superstock TT (4 laps) Ian Hutchinson BMW S1000RR Metzeler 2016 01:09:47.543 129.745 208.804[47][48]
TT Zero (1 lap) John McGuinness Mugen Shinden Dunlop 2015 18:58.743 119.279 191.961
Sidecar TT (3 laps) Ben Birchall and
Tom Birchall
LCR Sidecar Avon 2015 58:24.971 116.259 187.101

Race awards[edit]

Race winner trophies[edit]

Race Trophy Rider(s) Machine Tyres Year Average speed
mph km/h
Senior TT Senior Tourist Trophy1 Michael Dunlop BMW S1000RR Dunlop 2016 130.685 210.317[1][2]
TT Superbike TT Superbike Trophy Michael Dunlop BMW S1000RR Dunlop 2016 130.306 209.707[45][46]
TT Superstock John Hartle Trophy Ian Hutchinson BMW S1000RR Metzeler 2016 129.745 208.804[47][48]
TT Supersport Race 1 Junior Tourist Trophy Ian Hutchinson Yamaha YZF-R6 Metzeler 2016 126.445 203.494[51][52]
TT Supersport Race 2 Classic TT Trophy Ian Hutchinson Yamaha YZF-R6 Metzeler 2016 125.905 202.624[55]
TT Lightweight Lightweight TT Trophy Ivan Lintin Kawasaki ER650 Metzeler 2016 118.454 190.633[53]
TT Sidecar Race 1 Fred W. Dixon Trophy John Holden and
Andrew Winkle
LCR Suzuki 600 cc Avon 2016 114.282 183.919[49][50]
TT Sidecar Race 2 Sidecar TT Trophy Ben Birchall and
Tom Birchall
LCR Honda 600 cc Avon 2016 115.658 186.134[56]
  • ^1 Marquis de Mouzilly St Mars Trophy.

Fastest lap awards[edit]

Race Trophy Rider(s) Machine Year Average speed Time
mph km/h
Overall Jimmy Simpson Trophy Michael Dunlop BMW S1000RR 2016 133.962 215.591 16:53.929[1][2]
Senior TT Norman Brown Trophy Michael Dunlop BMW S1000RR 2016 133.962 215.591 16:53.929[1][2]
TT Superbike John Williams Trophy Michael Dunlop BMW S1000RR 2016 133.393 214.675 16:58.254[45][46]
TT Superstock Don Ryder Trophy Ian Hutchinson BMW S1000RR 2016 133.098 214.200 17:00.510[47][48]
TT Supersport Race Formula 2 TT Trophy Ian Hutchinson Yamaha YZF-R6 2016 128.259 206.413 17:39.013[57]
TT Sidecar Race Jock Taylor Trophy Ben Birchall and
Tom Birchall
LCR Honda 600 Sidecar 2016 116.798 187.968 19:22.928[49][50]

Special awards[edit]

Award Trophy Rider(s) Machine Year
TT Solo Championship Joey Dunlop Trophy Ian Hutchinson BMW S1000RR
Yamaha YZF-R6
2016[1]
TT Privateer's Champion TT Privateer's Champion Daniel Hegarty Kawasaki Ninja ZX-10R
Kawasaki Ninja ZX-6R
2016[1]
Overall Sidecar Championship RAC Sidecar Trophy John Holden and
Andrew Winkle
LCR Suzuki 600 cc 2016[58]
Sidecar Passenger Championship Craig Trophy Andrew Winkle LCR Suzuki 600 cc 2016[58]
Supersport Championship TT Supporters' Club Trophy Ian Hutchinson Yamaha YZF-R6 2016
Sidecar Chassis Championship Fred Hanks Trophy John Holden and
Andrew Winkle
LCR Suzuki 600 cc 2016[58]
Newcomers Sidecar Driver Championship Peter Chapman Trophy Lionel Mansuy Windle 600 cc 2015
Newcomers Sidecar Passenger Championship Dave Wells Trophy Matty Ramsden LCR 600 cc 2015
British competitor
British manufacturer
Joe Craig Trophy Guy Martin Triumph 675 cc 2015
Irish (North or South) solo competitor Martin Finnegan Trophy Michael Dunlop BMW S1000RR 2016[1][2]
Isle of Man solo competitor Gavin Lee Trophy Conor Cummins Honda CBR1000RR 2016[2]

Other Special awards[edit]

  • Fastest Newcomer - The Vernon Cooper Trophy
Rider(s) Machine Year Average speed Time
mph km/h
Derek McGee Honda 1000 cc 2015 121.928 196.224 18:33.999
  • Most Meritorious Female - The Susan Jeness Trophy is awarded yearly by the Executive Committee of the TT Supporters' Club, in recognition of the "most meritorious performance by a female competitor" during the previous TT meeting.[59]
Rider(s) Race Category Year
Jenny Tinmouth solo rider 2010
Jenny Tinmouth solo rider 2011
Debbie Baron as driver, Ireson Kawasaki Sidecar 600 cc 2012
Estelle Leblond as driver, Sidecar 600 cc 2013
Estelle Leblond as driver, Sidecar 600 cc 2014
(undecided) 2015

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Dunlop smokes records in Senior TT". Isle of Man TT (Duke Marketing Ltd.). 10 June 2016. Retrieved 11 June 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i "PokerStars Senior TT - Result Sheet" (PDF). Isle of Man TT. Duke Marketing Ltd. 10 June 2016. Retrieved 11 June 2016. 
  3. ^ The Manx Experience. A Souvenir Guide to the Isle of Man. page 66-67 Gordon N.Kniverton 8th edition The Manx Experience (1987) Mannin Publishing Ltd
  4. ^ The Guinness Motorcycle Sport Fact Book page 120 by Ian Morrisson Guinness Publishing Ltd (1991) The Bath Press ISBN 0-85112-953-6
  5. ^ International Tourist Trophy Regulations 2015 page 1 ACU Events (Isle of Man) Limited (2015) Isle of Man Department of Economic Development
  6. ^ Isle of Man Examiner - Brialtagh Ellan Vannin page 1 and 4 22 March 2016 Isle of Man Newspapers Ltd (2016) Johnson Press Publishing - Newsprint (Knowsley) Ltd. UK firm to promote TT Races
  7. ^ Isle of Man Examiner page 2 12 November 1921
  8. ^ Here Is the News: A Chronicle of the 20th Century, Volume 1 page 78 Gordon N.Kniverton & Terry Cringle Manx Heritage Foundation (1999) The Manx Experience ISBN 9781873120460
  9. ^ Official Programme – International Auto-Cycle Tourist Trophy 28 May 1907 pages 1-3 The Auto-Cycle Club (1907). Reproduction (2007) Isle of Man Post Office
  10. ^ 'Motor-Cycle pages 1 & 6 14th June 1972
  11. ^ Isle of Man's Big 3 Race Events : The Spectator Guide. TT (Tourist Trophy), Festival of Motorcycling (incorporating Manx Grand Prix), Southern 100 page 43 Trevor Barret (2014) Lily Publication ISBN 1907945237
  12. ^ Island Racer 2004 pp 112–113 Mortons Media Group Ltd. ISBN 9780954244224
  13. ^ TT Pioneers – Early Car Racing in the Isle of Man by Robert Kelly p68 The Manx Experience (1996) The Alden Press ISBN No 1 873120 61 3
  14. ^ The Motor Cycle pp545 dated 19 June 1905
  15. ^ Island Racer 2003 p89 Mortons Media Group Ltd ISBN 0954244222
  16. ^ 2015 International Tourist Trophy Regulations page 22 ACU Events Isle of Man Limited (2015) Isle of Man Department of Economic Development
  17. ^ 2015 International Tourist Trophy Regulations ACU Events Isle of Man Limited page 5 and page 58 Appendix A
  18. ^ 2015 International Tourist Trophy Regulations page 2 & Appendix C ACU Events Isle of Man Limited
  19. ^ International Tourist Trophy Regulations 2015 page 5/Appendix D page 34 ACU Events (Isle of Man) Limited (2015) Isle of Man Department of Economic Development
  20. ^ International Isle of Man TT Regulations 2012 page 41-42 Appendix-E ACU Events (Isle of Man) Ltd (2012) Isle of Man Department of Economic Development
  21. ^ International Tourist Trophy Regulations 2012 page 3/Appendix E page 43 ACU Events (Isle of Man) Limited (2015) Isle of Man Department of Economic Development
  22. ^ TT Topics and Tales by David Wright - Amulree Publications (4 April 2006) ISBN 1901508099
  23. ^ 2010 International Tourist Trophy Regulations page 2 ACU Events Isle of Man Limited
  24. ^ REGULATIONS TT ZERO – 2010 International Tourist Trophy – Isle of Man 29 May – 11 June p27 ACU Events Ltd (2010)
  25. ^ "History is made in the 2012 SES TT Zero". iomtt.com. 6 June 2012. Retrieved 24 May 2015. 
  26. ^ 1947 TT races, overview IoM TT.com. Retrieved 26 September 2015
  27. ^ 1950 Clubman TT 1000 cc class results IoM TT.com. Retrieved 26 September 2015
  28. ^ a b Motor Cycle, 9 March 1967, pp.284-286 Roadsters on the Magic Lap. A Production-TT Recce in Manxland by David Dixon. Accessed 26 September 2015
  29. ^ 1956 Clubman TT Junior class results IoM TT.com. Retrieved 26 September 2015
  30. ^ 1956 Clubman TT Senior class results IoM TT.com. Retrieved 26 September 2015
  31. ^ 1963 Senior race results, Competitor Ray Knight, Hughes Triumph, Manx Grand Prix.Org official website, Retrieved 19 October 2015
  32. ^ 1964 Senior race results, Competitor Ray Knight, Hughes Triumph, Manx Grand Prix.Org official website, Retrieved 19 October 2015
  33. ^ Ray Knight, Competitor Profile, IoM TT.com official website, Retrieved 19 October 2015
  34. ^ Motor Cyclist Illustrated, January 1965, p.41 More Production racing. Accessed 19 October 2015
  35. ^ "Practice and Race Schedule: 2016". Retrieved 12 July 2015. 
  36. ^ "New schedule". 
  37. ^ ROADS CLOSED TO THE PUBLIC TT ROAD RACES 2015 Isle of Man Department of Infrastructure -Rheynn Arraghey Bun-Troggalys Public Notice (2015) 1982 Road Racing Act (Isle of Man) "Notice is given that the Department of Infrastructure has made Orders under the Road Race Act 1982 & the Highways Act 1986. The Tourist Trophy Road Race Order 2015 permits the promoters to hold practices,races and parades during the TT Festival period."
  38. ^ "Mad Sunday". Isle of Man Today. 2013. 
  39. ^ ROADS CLOSED TO THE PUBLIC TT ROAD RACES 2015 Isle of Man Department of Infrastructure -Bun-Troggalys Public Notice (2015) "Notice is given that the Department of Infrastructure has made Orders under the Road Race Act 1982 & the Highways Act 1986. The Tourist Trophy Road Race Order 2015 permits the promoters to hold practices,races and parades during the TT Festival period."
  40. ^ TT roads closure notice 2016 Retrieved 1 June 2016
  41. ^ TVIM, 28 August 2013, Retrieved 12 December 2015
  42. ^ The Oxford Companion to Sports and Games Edited by John Arlott Oxford University Press (1975) pp. 669 ISBN 0-19-211538-3
  43. ^ "World's fastest way to die: Motorbike race that's killed 246". 
  44. ^ Records reported are lap times achieved during races only. Except where otherwise noted, sourcing in this table is from the IOMTT.COM website: title=IOM TT: Current Isle of Man TT Lap Records
  45. ^ a b c d "Dunlop obliterates records in opening RST Superbike TT Race". Isle of Man TT (Duke Marketing Ltd.). 4 June 2016. Retrieved 4 June 2016. 
  46. ^ a b c d "RST Superbike TT - Result Sheet" (PDF). Isle of Man TT. Duke Marketing Ltd. 4 June 2016. Retrieved 4 June 2016. 
  47. ^ a b c d "Hutchy too hot to handle in RL360º Quantum Superstock TT". Isle of Man TT (Duke Marketing Ltd.). 6 June 2016. Retrieved 7 June 2016. 
  48. ^ a b c d "RL360 Quantum Superstock TT - Result Sheet" (PDF). Isle of Man TT. Duke Marketing Ltd. 6 June 2016. Retrieved 7 June 2016. 
  49. ^ a b c "Holden & Winkle take dramatic win in Sure Sidecar Race 1". Isle of Man TT (Duke Marketing Ltd.). 4 June 2016. Retrieved 5 June 2016. 
  50. ^ a b c "Holden and Winkle win dramatic Sidecar TT". Isle of Man Today (Johnston Press). 4 June 2016. Retrieved 5 June 2016. 
  51. ^ a b "Ian Hutchinson wins Monster Energy Supersport TT in record time". Isle of Man TT (Duke Marketing Ltd.). 6 June 2016. Retrieved 7 June 2016. 
  52. ^ a b "Monster Energy Supersport TT 1 - Result Sheet" (PDF). Isle of Man TT. Duke Marketing Ltd. 6 June 2016. Retrieved 7 June 2016. 
  53. ^ a b "Bennetts Lightweight TT - Result Sheet" (PDF). Isle of Man TT. Duke Marketing Ltd. 8 June 2016. Retrieved 11 June 2016. 
  54. ^ "2015 Bennetts Lightweight TT results" (PDF). IOMTT.COM. 
  55. ^ "Monster Energy Supersport TT 2 - Result Sheet" (PDF). Isle of Man TT. Duke Marketing Ltd. 8 June 2016. Retrieved 11 June 2016. 
  56. ^ "Sure Sidecar TT 2 - Result Sheet" (PDF). Isle of Man TT. Duke Marketing Ltd. 10 June 2016. Retrieved 11 June 2016. 
  57. ^ "Monster Energy Supersport TT 1 - Result Sheet" (PDF). Isle of Man TT. Duke Marketing Ltd. 6 June 2016. Retrieved 11 June 2016. 
  58. ^ a b c "Birchalls on form in Sure Sidecar TT Race 2". Isle of Man TT (Duke Marketing Ltd.). 10 June 2016. Retrieved 11 June 2016. Holden/Winkle were secure in second and with the runners-up spot, they took the overall Sidecar Championship with Reeves/Farrance salvaging their TT race week with another podium. 
  59. ^ IoM TT.com, News, 28 December 2012 Retrieved 14 September 2015

References[edit]

  • Barker, Stuart (2007). 100 One Hundred Years of the TT. EMAP ISBN 1-84605-235-1
  • Duckworth, Mick (2007). TT 100 – The Authorised History of the Isle of Man Tourist Trophy Racing. Lily Publications ISBN 9781899602674
  • Harris, Nick (1991). Motocourse History of the Isle of Man Tourist Trophy Races 1907–1989 Hazelton Publishing ISBN 0-905138-71-6
  • Mac McDiarmid (2004). The Magic of The TT. A Century of Racing over The Mountain Haynes Publishing. ISBN 1-84425-002-4
  • Noyes, Denis (1999) 50 Years Of Moto Grand Prix. Hazelton Publishing Ltd ISBN 1-874557-83-7
  • Pidcock, Fred & Snelling, Bill (2007) History of the Isle of Man Clubman's TT Races 1947–1956. Amulree Publications ISBN 1-901508-10-2
  • Savage, Mike (1997) TT Heroes. Amulree Publications ISBN 0-9521126-9-8
  • Snelling, Bill (1996). The Tourist Trophy in Old Photographs Collected by Bill Snelling. Sutton Publishing ISBN 1-84015-059-9
  • Stroud, Jon (2007). The Little Book of the TT. Green Umbrella Publishing ISBN 1-905828-24-1
  • Wright, David (2007). 100 Years of the Isle of Man TT Races. A Century of Motorcycle Racing. Crowood Press ISBN 1-86126-906-4
  • Wright, David (2006). TT Topics and Tales. Amulree Publications ISBN 1-901508-09-9

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 54°10′02″N 4°28′44″W / 54.16722°N 4.47889°W / 54.16722; -4.47889