Islington South and Finsbury (UK Parliament constituency)

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Islington South and Finsbury
Borough constituency
for the House of Commons
Outline map
Boundary of Islington South and Finsbury in Greater London.
County Greater London
Electorate 67,613 (December 2010)[1]
Current constituency
Created 1974 (1974)
Member of parliament Emily Thornberry (Labour)
Number of members One
Created from Islington South West, and Shoreditch and Finsbury
Overlaps
European Parliament constituency London

Islington South and Finsbury /ˈɪzlɪŋtən sθ ənd fɪnzbri/ is a constituency[n 1] represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2005 by Emily Thornberry of the Labour Party.[n 2]

Boundaries[edit]

1974–1983: The London Borough of Islington wards of Barnsbury, Bunhill, Clerkenwell, Pentonville, St Mary, St Peter, and Thornhill.

1983–2010: As above, save that Pentonville was abolished and Canonbury East, Canonbury West, Hillmarton, Holloway were created or added to the seat.

2010–present: As above minus Hillmarton, and Thornhill; plus Caledonian ward; note Canonbury East and West ward from this date merged into Canonbury.

The seat covers the southern part of the London Borough of Islington, including Barnsbury, Canonbury, major parts of Holloway, Kings Cross and the former area of the Metropolitan Borough of Finsbury, which includes Bunhill, Pentonville and Clerkenwell.

History[edit]

Islington South and Finsbury was created in 1974 from part of the former Islington South West and Shoreditch and Finsbury constituencies. In 1983 its boundaries changed when the Islington Central constituency was abolished and its area split between Islington South and Finsbury and Islington North.

Political history

Islington was an early stronghold for the Social Democratic Party in which all three sitting Labour MPs defected to the party together with a majority of the Borough Council.[n 3] However, in spite of their less radical position than the Labour Party of the era, they won only one seat to Labour's 59 in the 1982 Islington Council elections[2] and in the 1983 general election, Labour managed to retain the constituency narrowly. The new MP, Chris Smith was the first MP to come out as gay and was identified with the Labour left, and kept the seat with a slight increase in his majority in 1987. By 1992 the post-merged SDP, the Liberal Democrats, had locally faded and no longer had the former MP as a candidate and Smith managed to win a majority exceeding 10,000 votes.

The Liberal Democrat revival in local elections in Islington, which saw them take control of the council in 2000, began to translate to Parliamentary elections in 2001. In 2002, the Liberal Democrats won every council seat in Islington South and Finsbury, and Smith's subsequent retirement and the resultant loss of incumbency made the constituency vulnerable once again in 2005. However Smith's successor, Emily Thornberry, retained the seat with a narrow majority (484 votes) over the Liberal Democrat challenger, Barnsbury Councilor Bridget Fox.[3] — the seat therefore became one of the ten most marginal in Britain. However, in the local council elections a year later, Labour made an almost full recovery locally and won a majority of the seats in Islington South and Finsbury, defeating both Bridget Fox and the then council leader Steve Hitchins.[4] At the 2010 general election, Thornberry increased her majority over Fox. In 2014 the Liberal Democrats lost all their remaining seats on the Council. The 2015 result made the seat the 93rd safest of Labour's 232 seats by percentage of majority.[5]

Constituency profile[edit]

The area is wholly urban but features a few small public greens which are family-friendly. The proximity and connectedness to the City of London mean the seat has a relatively high proportion of its electorate who are young workers in the city and contains many complimentary-course or white-painted brickwork — very rarely ostentatious stucco-clad — apartments and townhouses typically with attractive railings frequently lived in by high-income workers in the central or flagship operations of the public sector, critics, entertainers and writers. It contains a small minority of residences that are Victorian and early 20th century rehousing developments to replace poor housing closer to the city itself and in the east end of London or late twentieth century (largely former) social housing.

The constituency has been described as:

'A part-grand, part-poor metaphor for New Labour; Tony Blair lived here prior to his election as prime minister. Its dinner tables are routinely maligned as the natural habitat of the hypocritical, well-off, ostensibly liberal "chattering classes".'

— 2005, The Guardian[6]

'...a seat sometimes seen as the citadel of constitutional reform.'

— 2010, The Guardian[7]

Members of Parliament[edit]

Election Member[8] Party
Feb 1974 George Cunningham Labour
1982 SDP
1983 Christopher Smith Labour
2005 Emily Thornberry

Election results[edit]

Elections in the 2010s[edit]

General Election 2017: Islington South and Finsbury[9]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Emily Thornberry 30,188 62.8 +11.9
Conservative Jason Charalambous 9,925 20.7 -1.6
Liberal Democrat Alain Desmier 5,809 12.1 +1.2
Green Benali Hamdache 1,198 2.5 -5.1
UKIP Pete Muswell 929 1.9 -5.7
Majority 20,263 42.7 +14.0
Turnout 48,049 69.0 +4.0
Labour hold Swing +6.75
General Election 2015: Islington South and Finsbury[10][11][12]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Emily Thornberry 22,547 50.9 +8.7
Conservative Mark Lim 9,839 22.2 +2.8
Liberal Democrat Terry Stacy 4,829 10.9 −23.2
UKIP Pete Muswell 3,375 7.6 +6.0
Green Charlie Kiss 3,371 7.6 +6.0
CISTA Jay Kirton 309 0.7 N/A
Majority 12,708 28.7 +20.5
Turnout 44,270 65.0 +0.6
Labour hold Swing +3.0
General Election 2010: Islington South and Finsbury[13][14][15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Emily Thornberry 18,407 42.3 +2.4
Liberal Democrat Bridget Fox 14,838 34.1 −4.2
Conservative Antonia Cox 8,449 19.4 +4.6
Green James Humphreys 710 1.6 −3.1
UKIP Rose-Marie McDonald 701 1.6 +0.1
English Democrat John Dodds 301 0.7 N/A
Animals Count Richard Deboo 149 0.3 N/A
Majority 3,569 8.2
Turnout 43,555 64.4 +10.8
Labour hold Swing +3.3

Elections in the 2000s[edit]

General Election 2005: Islington South and Finsbury[16]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Emily Thornberry 12,345 39.9 −14.0
Liberal Democrat Bridget Fox 11,861 38.3 +10.2
Conservative Melanie McLean 4,594 14.8 +1.1
Green James Humphreys 1,471 4.8 N/A
UKIP Patricia Theophanides 470 1.5 N/A
Monster Raving Loony Andy "the Hat" Gardner 189 0.6 N/A
Independent Chris Gidden 31 0.1 N/A
Majority 484 1.6
Turnout 30,961 53.6 +6.2
Labour hold Swing −12.1
General Election 2001: Islington South and Finsbury[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Christopher Smith 15,217 53.9 −8.6
Liberal Democrat Keith Sharp 7,937 28.1 +6.8
Conservative Nicky Morgan 3,860 13.7 +0.7
Socialist Alliance Janine Booth 817 2.9 N/A
Independent Thomas McCarthy 276 1.0 +0.5
Stuckist Party Charles Thomson 108 0.4 N/A
Majority 7,280 25.8
Turnout 28,215 47.4 −16.3
Labour hold Swing

Elections in the 1990s[edit]

General Election 1997: Islington South and Finsbury[18]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Christopher Smith 22,079 62.5
Liberal Democrat Sarah Ludford 7,516 21.3
Conservative David Berens 4,587 13.00
Referendum Jane Bryett 741 2.10
Independent Alan Laws 171 0.5
Natural Law Martin Creese 121 0.3
Independent Erol Basarik 101 0.29
Majority 14,563 41.2
Turnout 35,316 63.7
Labour hold Swing
General Election 1992: Islington South and Finsbury[19]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Christopher Smith 20,586 51.1 +11.0
Conservative Mark Jones 9,934 24.7 +4.1
Liberal Democrat Christopher Pryce 9,387 23.3
Justice From British Rail Rhona Hersey 149 0.37
Monster Raving Loony Marie Avino 142 0.35
Natural Law Michael Avino 83 0.21
Majority 10,652 26.44
Turnout 40,281 72.52
Labour hold Swing

Elections in the 1980s[edit]

General Election 1987: Islington South and Finsbury[20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Christopher Smith 16,511 40.06
Social Democratic George Cunningham 15,706 38.10
Conservative Andrew Mitchell 8,482 20.58
Green Peter Powell 382 0.93
Socialist (GB) Stephen Dowsett 81 0.20
Humanist Judith Early 56 0.14
Majority 805 1.95
Turnout 41,218 71.18
Labour hold Swing
General Election 1983: Islington South and Finsbury[21]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Christopher Smith 13,460 36.31
Social Democratic George Cunningham 13,097 35.33
Conservative Arthur Johnston 9,894 26.69
National Front John Donegan 341 0.92
Islington and Finsbury Party J. Murphy 102 0.28
BNP D. Stentiford 94 0.25
Socialist (GB) Clifford Slapper 85 0.23
Majority 363 0.98
Turnout 37,073 62.0
Labour hold Swing

Elections in the 1970s[edit]

General Election 1979: Islington South and Finsbury
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour George Cunningham 12,581 52.04 -9.41
Conservative Nigel Waterson 8,237 34.07 +13.15
Liberal Antony Dean 1,991 8.24 -7.23
National Front Paul Kavanagh 824 3.41 N/A
Communist Marie Betteridge 330 1.36 -0.80
New Britain Dennis Delderfield 136 0.56 N/A
Socialist (GB) Ralph Critchfield 78 0.32 N/A
Majority 4,344 17.97
Turnout 62.92
Labour hold Swing
General Election October 1974: Islington South and Finsbury
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour George Cunningham 14,544 61.45 +7.14
Conservative P. Hodgson 3,951 20.92 -2.42
Liberal R. Adams 3,661 15.47 -4.05
Communist Marie Betteridge 512 2.16 +0.39
Majority 9,593 40.53
Turnout 56.02
Labour hold Swing
General Election February 1974: Islington South and Finsbury
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour George Cunningham 15,064 54.31
Conservative J. Szemerey 6,473 23.34
Liberal R. Adams 5,415 19.52
Communist Marie Betteridge 492 1.77
Independent A. Lomas 293 1.06
Majority 8,591 30.97
Turnout 66.06
Labour hold Swing

See also[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

Notes

  1. ^ A borough constituency (for the purposes of election expenses and type of returning officer)
  2. ^ As with all constituencies, the constituency elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election at least every five years.
  3. ^ This was at the time when the Labour Party voted for in Conference leaving the EEC (Common Market) and abolishing nuclear weapons during the Cold War which largely triggered the split.

References

  1. ^ "Electorate Figures – Boundary Commission for England". 2011 Electorate Figures. Boundary Commission for England. 4 March 2011. Archived from the original on 6 November 2010. Retrieved 13 March 2011. 
  2. ^ http://data.london.gov.uk/documents/LBCE_1982-5-6.pdf pp.40–41
  3. ^ Personal Website of Bridget Fox
  4. ^ LDA website document 488
  5. ^ List of Labour MPs elected in 2015 by % majority UK Political.info. Retrieved 2017-01-29
  6. ^ "Constituency Profile" 2005, The Guardian
  7. ^ Wintour, Patrick (25 November 2010). "Labour big beasts say no to voting reform". The Guardian. 
  8. ^ Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "I"
  9. ^ "Islington South & Finsbury parliamentary constituency". BBC News. 
  10. ^ "Election Data 2015". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 17 October 2015. Retrieved 17 October 2015. 
  11. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 2016-01-21. 
  12. ^ http://www.islington.gov.uk/publicrecords/library/Democracy/Publicity/Public-notices/2015-2016/(2015-04-09)-Statement-of-Persons-Nominated-South.pdf
  13. ^ "Election Data 2010". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 26 July 2013. Retrieved 17 October 2015. 
  14. ^ http://www.islington.gov.uk/DownloadableDocuments/CouncilandDemocracy/Pdf/electoral/sopn_south.pdf
  15. ^ BBC News http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/shared/election2010/results/constituency/c37.stm.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  16. ^ "Election Data 2005". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  17. ^ "Election Data 2001". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  18. ^ "Election Data 1997". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  19. ^ "Election Data 1992". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  20. ^ "Election Data 1987". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  21. ^ "Election Data 1983". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 

Coordinates: 51°32′17″N 0°06′22″W / 51.538°N 0.106°W / 51.538; -0.106