Issara Kachaiwong

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Issara Kachaiwong
Issara Kachaiwong.jpg
Born (1983-10-04) October 4, 1983 (age 35)
Chanthaburi, Thailand
Sport country Thailand
Professional2006–2008, 2010/11
Highest ranking86 (April–May 2011)
Career winningsGB£3,250
Highest break142
Best ranking finishRound-robin stage (2006 Grand Prix)
Tournament wins
Non-ranking1

Issara Kachaiwong (born October 4, 1983 in Chanthaburi, Thailand), is a former Thai professional snooker player.

Career[edit]

Kachaiwong first came to public attention in 2002 when he became the Thai national under-20 champion. He continued to impress on the amateur scene winning the first edition of the General Cup International, defeating players like Mark Allen and Dominic Dale and also capturing a gold medal at the 2004 Thai Games, before he finally qualified for the main tour by winning the 2006 Asian championships, defeating Mohammed Shehab 6–3 in the final.

His best performance in the debut season came at the 2006 Grand Prix in October in Aberdeen. During that tournament he impressed, winning 4 of his five matches during the group stages. His only loss came against John Higgins. However he failed to make the top two as both Higgins and Alan McManus, who Kachaiwong had beaten, had better frame differences. He was the only player who won four times in the group stages who did not make it through to the knockout stages. The rest of Kachaiwong's results was not good enough to keep him on tour, but he was handed a wild card for another season. Despite a last 64 run at the season-ending World Championship, he was again relegated.

At the 2010 ACBS Asian Snooker Championship Kachaiwong beat Mohammad Sajjad from Pakistan 7–3 in the final to become the champion and regained his tour card for the 2010/2011 season.[1] Once again he struggled for results, his best performance coming at the China Open where he reached the final qualifying round. He finished the season 87th in the world rankings and failed to retain his place on the tour.

Performance and rankings timeline[edit]

Tournament 2004/
05
2005/
06
2006/
07
2007/
08
2010/
11
2012/
13
2013/
14
Ranking[2][nb 1] [nb 2] [nb 2] [nb 3] 89 [nb 3] [nb 2] [nb 2]
Ranking tournaments
World Open A 1R RR LQ LQ A A
Shanghai Masters A Not Held LQ LQ A A
German Masters A Not Held LQ A A
UK Championship A A LQ LQ LQ A A
Welsh Open A A LQ LQ LQ A A
China Open A A LQ LQ LQ A A
World Championship A A LQ LQ LQ A A
Non-ranking tournaments
The Masters A A LQ LQ A A A
Former ranking tournaments
European Masters A A LQ Not Held A
Northern Ireland Trophy A A LQ LQ Not Held
Former non-ranking tournaments
General Cup[nb 4] W Not Held A
Variant format tournaments
Six-red World Championship Not Held A QF 2R
Performance Table Legend
LQ lost in the qualifying draw #R lost in the early rounds of the tournament
(WR = Wildcard round, RR = Round robin)
QF lost in the quarter-finals
SF lost in the semi-finals F lost in the final W won the tournament
DNQ did not qualify for the tournament A did not participate in the tournament WD withdrew from the tournament
NH / Not Held means an event was not held.
NR / Non-Ranking Event means an event is/was no longer a ranking event.
R / Ranking Event means an event is/was a ranking event.
RV / Ranking & Variant Format Event means an event is/was a ranking & variant format event.
MR / Minor-Ranking Event means an event is/was a minor-ranking event.
PA / Pro-am Event means an event is/was a pro-am event.
VF / Variant Format Event means an event is/was a variant format event.
  1. ^ From the 2010/2011 season it shows the ranking at the beginning of the season.
  2. ^ a b c d He was an amateur.
  3. ^ a b New players don't have a ranking.
  4. ^ The event was called the General Cup International (2004/2005–2011/2012)

Career finals[edit]

Non-ranking finals: 1 (1 titles)[edit]

Outcome No. Year Championship Opponent in the final Score
Winner 1. 2004 General Cup Wales Dominic Dale 6–3

Pro-am finals: 1 (1 titles)[edit]

Outcome No. Year Championship Opponent in the final Score
Winner 1. 2005 Southeast Asian Games Thailand Nitiwat Kanjanasari

Amateur finals: 4 (3 titles, 1 runner-up)[edit]

Outcome No. Year Championship Opponent in the final Score
Winner 1. 2005 Thailand Amateur Championship Thailand Kobkit Palajin 5–3
Winner 2. 2006 ACBS Asian Championship United Arab Emirates Mohammed Shehab 6–3
Runner-up 1. 2008 Thailand Amateur Championship Thailand James Wattana 1–5
Winner 3. 2010 ACBS Asian Championship (2) Pakistan Muhammad Sajjad 7–3

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Asian Championship 2010". ACBS. Retrieved 6 July 2010.
  2. ^ "Ranking History". Snooker.org. Archived from the original on 2012-10-21. Retrieved 12 March 2018.

External links[edit]