It Had to Be You (song)

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"It Had to Be You"
Song by Isham Jones
LanguageEnglish
Published1924
Released1924 (1924)[1]
GenrePop
LabelWarner Bros.[1]
Songwriter(s)Gus Kahn
Composer(s)Isham Jones

"It Had to Be You" is a popular song written by Isham Jones, with lyrics by Gus Kahn.[2] It was first published in 1924.

Appearance in film[edit]

The song was performed by Ruth Etting in the 1936 short film Melody in May, by Priscilla Lane in the 1939 film The Roaring Twenties, by Ginger Rogers and Cornel Wilde in the 1947 film It Had to Be You, in the 1944 film Mr. Skeffington, by Danny Thomas in the 1951 film I'll See You in My Dreams (based loosely upon the lives of Gus Kahn and his wife Grace LeBoy Kahn), and Joanne Dru sang a portion of it in 1955's Hell On Frisco Bay. Gene Kelly and Marie McDonald danced to it in the 1947 film Living in a Big Way (while it was being sung by a mixed group), and it was also performed by Dooley Wilson in the 1942 film Casablanca, George Murphy in Show Business (1944), Betty Hutton in the 1945 film Incendiary Blonde, and Diane Keaton in the 1977 film Annie Hall. It also appeared in the 1992 film A League of Their Own by Megan Cavanagh.

As the "theme" of When Harry Met Sally (1989), it finished as #60 in AFI's 100 Years...100 Songs survey of top tunes in American cinema.

Notable recordings[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Givan, Benjamin Marx (2010). The Music of Django Reinhardt (illustrated ed.). Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA: University of Michigan Press. p. 229. ISBN 9780472034086. OCLC 437054201. Retrieved February 15, 2013.
  2. ^ ASCAP ACE Database Archived 2003-07-17 at the Wayback Machine.
  3. ^ Melody in May (1936), short film on YouTube
  4. ^ Doris Day album I'll See You in My Dreams (1951) at allmusic.com
  5. ^ "A Bing Crosby Discography". BING magazine. International Club Crosby. Retrieved September 18, 2017.
  6. ^ Michael Bublé's Christmas in New York, broadcast December 17, 2014 (NBC)

Bibliography[edit]

  • Who Wrote that Song? Dick Jacobs and Harriet Jacobs, published by Writer's Digest Books, 1993