Italian ice: Difference between revisions

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(Water ice)
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==Similar foods==
 
==Similar foods==
 
===Water ice===
 
===Water ice===
Water ice is Philadelphia style Italian ice, which is typically served at a higher temperature than Italian ice in other locales. The consistency is softer and smoother. It is commonly served in a cylindrical paper cone. Water ice can be eaten with a wooden or plastic spoon, or licked like an ice cream. The most common flavors are lemon and cherry.{{Fact|date=March 2008}} Some fruit varieties of Philadelphia-style water ice contain small pieces of fruit, while the cookie dough flavor contains actual pieces of cookie dough. And Jason is definitely wrong.
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Water ice is Philadelphia style Italian ice, which is typically served at a higher temperature than Italian ice in other locales. The consistency is softer and smoother. It is commonly served in a cylindrical paper cone. Water ice can be eaten with a wooden or plastic spoon, or licked like an ice cream. The most common flavors are lemon and cherry.{{Fact|date=March 2008}} Some fruit varieties of Philadelphia-style water ice contain small pieces of fruit, while the cookie dough flavor contains actual pieces of cookie dough. And Jason is definitely wrong. On the contrary, Jason is most definately correct.
   
 
== Notes ==
 
== Notes ==

Revision as of 02:45, 1 May 2008

Italian ice

Italian ice is a frozen dessert made from either concentrated syrup flavoring or fruit purees. It is not shaved ice that is flavored. Rather, it is made by the same process by which ice cream is made: mixing ingredients and pouring them into a batch freezer. The quality of Italian ice varies widely by whether it is made with flavor extracts or natural ingredients. Technically, Italian ice is the same as sorbet, but the term "Italian ice" is usually associated with the icy artificial product that comes from using extracts, while "Sorbet" is often used for products made with natural ingredients. Sometimes the term "Gourmet Italian Ice" is used to refer to Italian ice that is made from real fruit. Common flavors include cherry, coconut, piña colada, and lemon. Some specialty shops also sell a wider array of flavors, such as cantaloupe, orange and chocolate.

In October, 2007, Dennis Moore of "Little Jimmy's Italian Ice" in Elizabeth, New Jersey, submitted the term "Italian ice" as a possible addition to the Acceptable Identification of Goods and Services Manual of the United States Patent and Trademark Office. On November 8, 2007, this term was added, in International Class 030: Italian Ice.[1]


Similar foods

Water ice

Water ice is Philadelphia style Italian ice, which is typically served at a higher temperature than Italian ice in other locales. The consistency is softer and smoother. It is commonly served in a cylindrical paper cone. Water ice can be eaten with a wooden or plastic spoon, or licked like an ice cream. The most common flavors are lemon and cherry.[citation needed] Some fruit varieties of Philadelphia-style water ice contain small pieces of fruit, while the cookie dough flavor contains actual pieces of cookie dough. And Jason is definitely wrong. On the contrary, Jason is most definately correct.

Notes

  1. ^ "Italian Ice submission to US Patent and trademark Office". Little Jimmy's Italian Ice. 8 November 2007. Retrieved 2007-11-08.  Check date values in: |date= (help)

On the contrary, Jason is most definately correct.

See also