Ivan Privalov

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Ivan Privalov
Born (1891-02-11)11 February 1891
Nizhniy Lomov, Penza guberniya, Russia
Died July 13, 1941(1941-07-13) (aged 50)
Moscow, USSR
Citizenship Russia, USSR
Nationality Russian
Fields Mathematics
Institutions Imperial Saratov University (1917–1922)
Moscow State University (1922–1941)
Alma mater Moscow State University
Doctoral advisor Dmitri Egorov
Doctoral students Samarii Aleksandrovich Galpern
Known for works on analytical functions, Luzin-Privalov theorems.

Ivan Ivanovich Privalov (Russian: Ивáн Ивáнович Привáлов; 11 February 1891 – 13 July 1941) was a Russian mathematician best known for his work on analytic functions.

Biography[edit]

Privalov graduated from Moscow State University (MSU) in 1913 studying under Dimitri Egorov and Nikolai Lusin. He obtained his master's degree from MSU in 1916 and became Professor at Imperial Saratov University (1917—1922). In 1922 he was appointed as Professor at MSU and worked there for the rest of his life.

Corresponding member of the USSR Academy of Sciences (since 1939). Member of the French Mathematical Society (Société Mathématique de France) and the Mathematical Circle of Palermo (Circolo Matematico di Palermo).

Research work[edit]

Privalov wrote Cauchy Integral (1918) which built on work by Fatou. He also worked on many problems jointly with Luzin. In 1934 he studied subharmonic functions, building on the work of Riesz.

PhD students[edit]

  • Samarii Aleksandrovich Galpern.

Publications[edit]

Books[edit]

  • I. I. Privalov, Subharmonic Functions, GITTL, Moscow, 1937.
  • I. I. Privalov, Introduction to the Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable, GITTL, Moscow-Leningrad, 1948 (14n ed: 1999, ISBN 5-06-003612-X).
  • I. I. Privalov, Boundary Properties of Analytic Functions, 2nd ed., GITTL, Moscow-Leningrad, 1950.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Solomentsev, E.D. (2001), "Luzin–Privalov theorems", in Hazewinkel, Michiel, Encyclopedia of Mathematics, Springer, ISBN 978-1-55608-010-4