Izumo Taishakyo Mission of Hawaii

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Izumo Taishakyo
Hawaii Izumo Taisha
ハワイ出雲大社
Hawaii Izumo Taisha  ハワイ出雲大社 is located in Hawaii
Hawaii Izumo Taisha  ハワイ出雲大社
Hawaii Izumo Taisha
ハワイ出雲大社
Location within Hawaii
Information
Dedicated to Ōkuninushi, Hawaii Ubusuna-no-Kami
Founded 1906
Priest(s) Bishop Daiya Amano
Rev. Jun Miyasaka
Honden style Taisha-zukuri
Address 215 N Kukui St, Honolulu, HI 96817
Coordinates 21°18′55.984″N 157°51′39.682″W / 21.31555111°N 157.86102278°W / 21.31555111; -157.86102278Coordinates: 21°18′55.984″N 157°51′39.682″W / 21.31555111°N 157.86102278°W / 21.31555111; -157.86102278
Website www.facebook.com/Izumo-Taishakyo-Mission-of-Hawaii-162743883736181/
Shinto torii icon vermillion.svg Glossary of Shinto

The Izumo Taishakyo Mission is a Shinto shrine located in downtown Honolulu, Hawaii. It is one of the few active Shinto shrines in the United States. The wooden A-frame structure was inspired by Shimane Prefecture's classical Japanese shrine Izumo Taisha. It was designed by architect Hego Fuchino and built by master carpenter Ichisaburo Takata.

The primary kami of this shrine is Ōkuninushi and Hawaii Ubusuna-no-Kami. Also enshrined are Okinawa Shrine, Naminoue Shrine, Futenma Shrine, Inari Shrine, and Ebisu Shrine, and Waianae Ugikami. [1]

The shrine is the site of the annual New Year's Day hatsumōde as well as other events throughout the year. A replica of the Hiroshima Peace Bell is on view. The annual Hiroshima Commemoration and Peace Service is held at Hawaii Izumo Taisha to commemorate the atomic bombing of Hiroshima. [2]

History[edit]

Hawaii Izumo Taisha was founded in 1906 when Rev. Katsuyoshi Miyao opened a temporary worship site on Aala Street near Aala Park on 26 September 1906.[3] A temporary shrine building was completed on 25 August 1907. A permanent shrine building was completed in 1922.[4] By 1941, there were branches of Izumo Taishakyo operating in Hilo, Wailuku, Waipahu, Pearl City, Honouliuli, Ewa Lower Camp, Aiea, and Kakaako.[5]

The shrine was closed on 7 December 1941 at the outset of World War II. The shrine was illegally acquired by the City and County of Honolulu in June 1942. After interment on the mainland, the priest and family returned to Hawaii in mid-December 1945. A temporary shrine was consecrated in a residence-like warehouse in McCully area of Honolulu and served as a worship site from 1946-1968.[6]

The original shrine property was returned to the shrine organization in October 1961 as a result of lengthy legal and legislative appeals.[7] The shrine building was moved in 1963 to its present location to make way for Federal Housing Administration redevelopment. The shrine was restored from 1968-1969 at a cost of $170,000. Funds were donated entirely by the people of Hawaii. The shrine was rededicated on 22 December 1968.[8]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Miyao, Richard T. Izumo Taishakyo Mission of Hawaii Centennial Anniversary Saga of a Church in Hawaii, 1906-2006. Hawaii Hochi, Ltd. Honolulu, Hawaii. 2006. p. 81.
  2. ^ "Peace Events Commemorate 70th Anniversary Of The End Of World War II", The Hawaii Herald, Honolulu, Retrieved on 31 January 2017.
  3. ^ Maeda, Takakazu. Hawaii no Jinjashi. Taimeido. Tokyo. 1999. p. 153.
  4. ^ Maeda, Takakazu. Hawaii no Jinjashi. Taimeido. Tokyo. 1999. p. 161.
  5. ^ Maeda, Takakazu. Hawaii no Jinjashi. Taimeido. Tokyo. 1999. p. 174.
  6. ^ Miyao, Richard T. Izumo Taishakyo Mission of Hawaii Centennial Anniversary Saga of a Church in Hawaii, 1906-2006. Hawaii Hochi, Ltd. Honolulu, Hawaii. 2006. p. 87-88.
  7. ^ Maeda, Takakazu. Hawaii no Jinjashi. Taimeido. Tokyo. 1999. p. 180.
  8. ^ Miyao, Richard T. Izumo Taishakyo Mission of Hawaii Centennial Anniversary Saga of a Church in Hawaii, 1906-2006. Hawaii Hochi, Ltd. Honolulu, Hawaii. 2006. p. 92.