János Garay (fencer)

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Jànos Garay
Born23 February 1889
Died5 March 1945 (1945-03-06) (aged 56)
NationalityHungarian
Olympic medal record
Men's Fencing
Representing  Hungary
Gold medal – first place 1928 Amsterdam Team sabre
Silver medal – second place 1924 Paris Team sabre
Bronze medal – third place 1924 Paris Individual sabre

János Garay (23 February 1889 in Budapest, Hungary – 5 March 1945 in Mauthausen-Gusen concentration camp, Oberösterreich, Austria) was a Hungarian fencer,[1] and one of the best sabre fencers in the world in the 1920s.[2][3]

Personal[edit]

Garay had two children: Jànos, a water polo player and Mària, a swimmer. He was also father-in-law to Valéria Gyenge.

Fencing career[edit]

Hungarian Championship[edit]

Garay was the Hungarian national sabre champion in 1923.[4]

European and World Championships[edit]

In 1925[4] and 1930, Garay captured the Individual European Sabre Championship gold medal. He won the team sabre gold medal at the 1930 European Championships.

Olympics[edit]

He won silver medal for team saber at the 1924 Paris Olympics.[5]

He also won a gold medal in team saber at the 1928 Amsterdam Games.[5]

Concentration Camp and Death[edit]

He was one of 437,000 Jews deported from Hungary to a concentration camp after Germany occupied the country in 1944.[4]

Garay was killed shortly thereafter, in 1945, in the Mauthausen concentration camp in Austria, shortly before the end of World War II.[6][7]

Hall of Fame[edit]

Garay, who was Jewish, was inducted in 1990 into The International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame, Wingate Institute, Netanya, Israel.[8][9][10]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.mob.hu/cgi-bin/index.php?file=belso/memorian.html Archived 2006-06-20 at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ "Uc_Hilal: Jews In Sports". Jewsinsports.org. Retrieved March 26, 2010.
  3. ^ "János Garay Biography and Olympic Results | Olympics at". Sports-reference.com. Retrieved March 26, 2010.
  4. ^ a b c János Garay Bio, Stats, and Results | Olympics at Sports-Reference.com
  5. ^ a b "János Garay Olympic Results". sports-reference.com. Retrieved March 26, 2010.
  6. ^ Schaffer, Kay; Smith, Sidonie (2000). The Olympics at the Millennium: Power, Politics, and the Games. Rutgers University Press. pp. 60–62. ISBN 978-0-8135-2820-5.
  7. ^ "Olympians Who Were Killed or Missing in Action or Died as a Result of War". Sports Reference. Retrieved 24 July 2018.
  8. ^ Taylor, Paul (2004). Jews and the Olympic Games: The Clash Between Sport and Politics – With a Complete Review of Jewish Olympic Medalists. Sussex Academic Press.
  9. ^ Continuing Persecution
  10. ^ "Janos Garay". January 25, 2010. Archived from the original on October 5, 2010. Retrieved March 26, 2010. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)

External links[edit]