J. T. Haxall

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J. T. Haxall
Jthaxall.png
Princeton Tigers
PositionGuard/Kicker
Class1883
Career history
CollegePrinceton (1881–1882)
Personal information
Born:(1860-04-22)April 22, 1860
Virginia
Died:July 9, 1939(1939-07-09) (aged 79)
Maryland
Weight158 lb (72 kg)
Career highlights and awards
  • National championship, 1881
  • Longest field goal (65 yards)

John Triplett "Jerry" Haxall (April 22, 1860 – July 9, 1939) was a college football player. On November 30, 1882,[1] he kicked a 65-yard field goal from placement[2][n 1] for a then record[4] in the PrincetonYale contest at the Polo Grounds.[5][6] The record stood until 1976.[7][8] Haxall later remarked "My epitaph will probably be: J. T. Haxall. Kicked a football. That's all."[9]

Early years[edit]

John Triplett Haxall was born in Virginia on April 22, 1860 to Bolling Walker Haxall and Anne Triplett. His father was a flour milling heir whose Richmond house built in 1858 is on the National Register of Historic Places.[10]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The spectators did not measure the distance, but it was long estimated as 65 yards and by all accounts was beyond midfield.[3]

Endnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Parke H. Davis. Football, the American Intercollegiate Game. p. 372.
  2. ^ Frank G. Menke (May 1999). "Long-Distance Kicking" (PDF). College Football Historical Society. 12 (3): 6. Retrieved May 25, 2015 – via LA84.
  3. ^ Grantland Rice (November 30, 1915). "The Sport Light". The Marion Star. p. 8. Retrieved March 4, 2016 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  4. ^ Parke H. Davis (1913). "The Field Goal Record". Official Football Rules: 233.
  5. ^ "[1]". New York Times. December 1, 1882.
  6. ^ "Princeton Guard Loses 30 Pounds in 1 Game". Columbia Daily Spectator. 59 (35). November 14, 1935. p. 3.
  7. ^ Mark F. Bernstein. Football: The Ivy League Origins of an American Obsession. p. 21.
  8. ^ Mark F. Bernstein. Princeton Football. p. 14.
  9. ^ "Obituary". Princeton Alumni Weekly. 39: 845–846. July 7, 1939.
  10. ^ "The Historic Bolling Haxall House".

External links[edit]