JCSAT-16

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JCSAT-16
JCSAT-16 launch (28969742675).jpg
JCSAT-16 being launched aboard Falcon 9 Flight 28.
Mission typeCommunication
OperatorSKY Perfect JSAT Group
COSPAR ID2016-050A[1][2]
SATCAT no.41729[3][4]
WebsiteOfficial Page
Spacecraft properties
SpacecraftJCSAT-16
BusSSL 1300
ManufacturerSSL
Launch mass4,600 kg (10,100 lb)[5]
Power8.5 kW[5]
Start of mission
Launch date05:26, August 14, 2016 (UTC) (2016-08-14T05:26Z)[6][3]
RocketFalcon 9 Full Thrust
Launch siteCape Canaveral SLC-40
ContractorSpaceX
Transponders
BandKu band and Ka band
 

JCSAT-16 is a geostationary communications satellite operated by SKY Perfect JSAT Group and designed and manufactured by SSL on the SSL 1300 platform.[1][7] It has a launch weight of 4,600 kg (10,100 lb), a power production capacity of 8.5 kW and a 15-year design life.[5] Its payload is composed of Ku band and Ka band transponders. SKY Perfect JSAT Group plans to use JCSAT-16 as an in-orbit backup satellite for the Ku- and Ka-band satellites serving the Japanese market.[7]

SpaceX's Falcon 9 Flight 28 propelled JCSAT-16 to a geosynchronous transfer orbit on August 14, 2016.

History[edit]

In April 2014, SSL announced that it had been awarded a contract by SKY Perfect JSAT Group to manufacture two satellites: JCSAT-15 and JCSAT-16. The latter would be an 8.5 kW satellite with Ku band and Ka band payload for a broad range of orbital locations. It would be used as a back-up to the existing fleet.[8]

On September 10, 2014, JSAT announced that it had signed a launch service contract with SpaceX for the launch of JCSAT-16 aboard a Falcon 9 rocket.[9] On April 3, 2016, it was announced that Kratos had been selected for supplying a 9 m (30 ft) Ku-band antenna for JCSAT-16 TT&C at its Superbird Platform West ground station. Also, it was stated that the satellite had passed the critical design review.[10]

On July 13, 2016, SSL delivered JCSAT-16 to the launch site in Cape Canaveral for launch processing and integration.[11] This was the second launch of the year for JCSAT and also the second time the company used the SpaceX launch services, both times also happening in 2016.[1] On August 4, 2016, JSAT announced that the expected launch date of JCSAT-16 was on August 14.[12]

Landed first stage from the JCSAT-16 launch
First stage landed after successfully delivering JCSAT-16

At the scheduled August 14 at 05:26  UTC, SpaceX successfully launched the JCSAT-16 satellite into a 184 km × 35,912 km × 20.85° orbit on a Falcon 9 rocket.[13][14][15] The first stage successfully landed afterwards.[6][16] At 5:58 UTC, the satellite separated from the upper stage.[15] The satellite manufacturer, SSL, announced that 33 minutes after launch, the satellite was in good health and sending signals.[16]

While JCSAT-16 was supposed to serve as on-orbit backup at the 124° East longitude position, it will be repositioned into service at the 162°East position to replace Superbird-B2, a satellite past its design life. Originally Superbird-8 was supposed to replace Superbird-B2, but a mishap during transport to the launch site in March 2016 meant that it would be delayed between one and two years.[6][16]

On late September 2016, parts of Falcon 9 second stage reentered the atmosphere and landed over Java and Madura, Indonesia. Some parts like the Helium COPV (Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel) landed mostly intact and damaged an animal enclosure, but there was no further damage or harm.[17]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Krebs, Gunter Dirk (2016-04-21). "JCSat 16". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2016-07-20.
  2. ^ "JCSAT 16". NASA Space Science Data Coordinated Archive. August 23, 2016. Retrieved 2016-08-30.
  3. ^ a b "JCSAT 16". NASA Space Science Data Coordinated Archive. August 23, 2016. Retrieved 2016-08-30.
  4. ^ "JCSAT 16". n2yo.com. Retrieved 2016-08-30.
  5. ^ a b c "JCSat 16". Satbeams. Retrieved 26 July 2016.
  6. ^ a b c Graham, William (August 14, 2016). "SpaceX launches second JCSAT mission via Falcon 9". NASASpaceFlight.com. Retrieved 2016-08-14.
  7. ^ a b "JCSat 16". SSL. Retrieved 26 July 2016.
  8. ^ "SSL selected to provide two satellites to Sky Perfect JSAT". SSL. 2014-04-16. Retrieved 26 July 2016.
  9. ^ "SKY Perfect JSAT signed Launch Service Contract for JCSAT-16 satellite with SpaceX" (PDF). SKY Perfect JSAT Group. 2014-09-10. Retrieved 26 July 2016.
  10. ^ "Sky Perfect JSAT Inks Kratos Contract for JCSAT 16 TT&C Antenna and RF System". Via Satellite. 2016-03-03. Retrieved 26 July 2016.
  11. ^ "SSL delivers communications satellite for Sky Perfect JSAT to Cape Canaveral launch base". SSL. 2016-07-13. Retrieved 26 July 2016.
  12. ^ "JCSAT-16 Launch Schedule Update" (PDF). SKY Perfect JSAT Corporation. August 4, 2016. Retrieved 2016-08-15.
  13. ^ "API Search". space-track.org. 2016-08-16. Retrieved 2016-08-16.
  14. ^ Christina Ra (2016-08-12). "Press Kit: JCSAT-16 Mission". SpaceX. Retrieved 2016-08-14.
  15. ^ a b "Notice Regarding Successful Launch of the JCSAT-16 Communications Satellite" (PDF). SKY Perfect JSAT Corporation. August 14, 2016. Retrieved 2016-08-15.
  16. ^ a b c de Selding, Peter B. (August 14, 2016). "SpaceX successfully launches JCSat-16 satellite, faces crowded end-year manifest". Space News. Retrieved August 15, 2016.
  17. ^ https://spaceflight101.com/spacex-rocket-parts-rain-down-over-indonesia