JFE Holdings

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JFE Holdings, Inc.
Native name
JFE ホールディングス株式会社
Public KK
Traded as TYO: 5411
NAG: 5411
TOPIX Large 70 Component
ISIN JP3386030005
Industry Steel
Predecessor NKK Corporation
Kawasaki Steel
Founded September 27, 2002; 15 years ago (2002-09-27) (through merger)
Headquarters Uchisaiwaichō, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-0011, Japan
Area served
Worldwide
Key people
Eiji Hayashida
(President and CEO)
Products
  • Steel
  • Flat steel products
  • Long steel products
  • Wire products
  • Steel plates
Services
  • Engineering
  • Trading services
Revenue

JPY 3,308 billion (FY 2016)

(US$ 30.5 billion) (FY 2016)

JPY 67.9 billion (FY 2016)

(US$ 627 million) (FY 2016)
Number of employees
60,439 (consolidated, as of March 31, 2017)
Subsidiaries JFE Steel
JFE Engineering
Japan Marine United (45.93%)
Website Official website
Footnotes / references
[1][2]

JFE Holdings, Inc. (JFE ホールディングス株式会社, Jeiefuī Hōrudingusu Kabushiki-gaisha) is a corporation headquartered in Tokyo, Japan. It was formed in 2002 by the merger of NKK (日本鋼管株式会社, Nippon Kōkan Kabushiki Kaisha) and Kawasaki Steel Corporation (川崎製鉄株式会社, Kawasaki Seitetsu Kabushiki-gaisha). At the time, NKK Corporation was Japan's second largest steelmaker and Kawasaki Steel was the third largest steelmaker.[3] Both companies were major military vessel manufacturers during World War II.

JFE's main business is steel production. It also engages in engineering, ship building, real-estate redevelopment, and LSi business. The company also operates several overseas subsidiaries, including California Steel Industries in the United States, Fujian Sino-Japan Metal in China, and Minas da Serra Geral in Brazil. Other than steel, they are also known for products such as the bicycle tree.[4]

JFE Holdings is the fifth largest steel maker in the world with revenue in excess of US$30 billion. JFE Holdings has several subsidiaries including JFE Engineering, JFE Steel and JFE Shoji.[4]

NKK and Siderca S.A. of Argentina established a seamless pipe joint venture by spinning off the seamless pipe division of NKK's Keihin Works in 2000.[4] In November 2009, JFE agreed to partner with JSW Steel, India's third-largest steel producer, to construct a joint steel plant in West Bengal.[5]

Its shipbuilding unit, Universal Shipbuilding was created in 2002 when NKK Corporation a predecessor of JFE, merged its shipbuilding unit with that of Hitachi Zosen. In 2012, JFE merged its ship building unit, Universal Shipbuilding Corporation, with Marine United Inc. of IHI after discussion started in April 2008 to form Japan Marine United Corporation[6] It aims to become Japan’s largest shipbuilder.[7]

Major plant locations[edit]

The steel production sites of JFE Steel, a JFE Holding subsidiary, are organized into two regions, East Japan and West Japan.

East production sites[edit]

There are two major steel works in the East Japan Production Sites (JFEスチール東日本製鉄所):

Keihin Steel Works[edit]

Nippon Kokan Co., Ltd., was established with a steel pipes plant in Kawasaki, Kanagawa, on Tokyo Bay, in 1912. After the Second World War, the plant was re-established there in 1946. Its Tsurumi site, Mizue site and the fist blast furnace in Mizue were established, respectively, in 1947, 1959 and 1962. In 1968, all these three sites were integrated into Keihin Works (京浜製鉄所). New works in Ogishima (扇島), a newly reclaimed land nearby, started operation in 1971, and the second blast furnace was constructed there in 1976. Currently only one out of two blast furnace are in operation. [8]

Chiba Steel Works's blast furnace

Chiba Steel Works[edit]

Kawasaki Heavy Industries, established in 1878, incorporated Kawasaki Steel in 1965. Kawasaki Steel constructed Japan's most modern steel works in 1951, in Chiba, Chiba (千葉製鉄所), on Tokyo Bay. [9]The first, second, fifth and sixth furnaces were completed, respectively, in 1953, 1958, 1965, and 1977. The first four furnaces are already demolished.

West production sites[edit]

There are two major steel works in the West Japan production sites (JFEスチール西日本製鉄所):

Kurashiki Steel Works[edit]

Kurashiki Steel Works (倉敷製鉄所), which was known as Mizushima Steel Works, was established by Kawasaki Steel in 1961, in Mizushima, Kurashiki, Okayama on the Inland Sea, adjacent to Mitsubishi Motors's Mizushima Plant.As of February, 2010, three out of four blast furnaces are in operation.

The roof of the shipment quays at Fukuyama Steel Works

Fukuyama Steel Works[edit]

Fukuyama Steel Works(福山製鉄所) in Fukuyama, Hiroshima, on the Inland Sea, opened in 1965 by Nippon Kokan. As of May 2011, three blast furnaces out of the existing four (Nos. 3, 4 and 5) are in operation.

JFE Steel has also invested in overseas steel companies, such as Dongkuk Steel in Korea.

Products[edit]

Super-rapid charging[edit]

JFE Engineering Corporation is developing a quick charge system that it claims can take a battery from zero charge to 50% full in about 3 minutes. It has two batteries, one that stores electrical energy from the grid and another that delivers it to the car at extremely high current (500-600 amps), which allows it to use a low-voltage power supply.[10] The company claims that even though one station costs about $63,000, that’s roughly 40% less than the competing CHAdeMO system.[11]

Bicycle Tree[edit]

The bicycle tree is an automatic storage system for bicycles that can hold up to 6,000 bikes. The systems works by fitting the bicycle with an electronic tag and a computer saves the owner's data. Then a mechanical arm pulls the bike into a cylindrical well and stores it in a free location. When the owner wants to retrieve the bike, a card is swiped through a reader and the computer retrieves the bike based on the data.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Outline of JFE Holdings". JFE Holdings. Retrieved November 28, 2017. 
  2. ^ "Company Profile". Nikkei Asian Review. Nikkei Inc. Retrieved November 28, 2017. 
  3. ^ "JJapan steel merger to join No. 2, No. 3". The Baltimore Sun. April 14, 2001. Retrieved May 28, 2015. 
  4. ^ a b c Picken, Stuart D. B. (December 19, 2016). Historical Dictionary of Japanese Business. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. pp. 215–216. ISBN 978-1-4422-5589-0. 
  5. ^ Sunil Nair (November 19, 2009). "JSW Steel, Japan JFE to consider steel plant in India". Reuters. Retrieved November 20, 2009. 
  6. ^ Suga, Masumi (January 30, 2012). "JFE, IHI to Merge Shipbuilding Units to Survive Competition". Bloomberg.com. Retrieved May 28, 2015. 
  7. ^ "JFE, IHI Ship Merger to Target $6.2 Billion of Sales in 5 Years - Bloomberg Business". Bloomberg.com. March 1, 2012. Retrieved May 28, 2015. 
  8. ^ JFEグループの歩み(日本鋼管NKK)
  9. ^ JFEグループの歩み(川崎製鉄)
  10. ^ Keisuke Ogawa (June 21, 2010). "JFE Engineering Announces 'Super-rapid' EV Charging System". Tech-On!. Nikkei Business Publications. Retrieved June 27, 2010. 
  11. ^ Nick Chambers (May 5, 2010). "Ultra Quick Battery Charge System Developed: 50% Full in 3 Minutes". gas2.0. Retrieved June 27, 2010. 
  12. ^ Munk, David (November 5, 2009). "Has Japan designed the world's best bike shed?". The Guardian. Retrieved November 28, 2017. 

External links[edit]