JNR Class C56

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Class C56
JRW SL-Kitabiwako-gou C56-160.JPG
C56 160 on a steam special in February 2012
Type and origin
Power type Steam
Builder Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Hitachi, Nippon Sharyo, Kawasaki Heavy Industries Rolling Stock Company, Kisha Seizō
Build date 1935-1939
Specifications
Configuration 2-6-0 Mogul
Gauge
  • 1,067 mm (3 ft 6 in)
  • 1,000 mm (3 ft 3 38 in) (Thailand/Burma)
Driver dia. 1,400 mm (4 ft 7 in)
Length 14,325 mm (47 ft 0 in)
Total weight 65.53 t
Performance figures
Tractive effort 8,290 kg

The Class C56 is a type of 2-6-0 steam locomotive built by the Japanese Government Railways (JGR) from 1935 to 1939, and later operated by Japanese National Railways (JNR).

History[edit]

A total of 164 Class C56 locomotives were built between 1935 and 1939.[1]

Locomotives C56 1 to 90 and 161 to 164 were sent to Asian countries occupied by Japan during World War II.[1]

Preserved examples[edit]

A number of Class C56 locomotives are preserved in Japan and other Asian countries.[2] C56 160 is maintained in operating condition by JR West for use on main line steam specials.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Inoue, Kōichi (1999). 国鉄機関車辞典 [JNR Locomotive Encyclopedia] (in Japanese). Japan: Sankaido. p. 36-37. ISBN 4-381-10338-6. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v Sasada, Masahiro (25 November 2014). 国鉄&JR保存車大全2015-2016 [JNR & JR Preserved Rolling Stock Complete Guide 2015-2016] (in Japanese). Tokyo, Japan: Ikaros Publications Ltd. p. 128. ISBN 978-4863209282. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j รถจักรและรถพ่วง พัฒนาการที่ยิ่งใหญ่ จากอดีตสู่ปัจจุบัน [SRT Rolling Stock] (in Thai). Bangkok, Thailand: State Railway of Thailand. 2011. p. 27-29. ISBN 978-974-9848-99-9. 
  4. ^ a b Rotfaithai.Com C56 Steam Locomotive Gallery
  5. ^ McNeill, David Building a bridge to forgiveness October 9, 2005 The Japan Times Retrieved March 17, 2016
  6. ^ Simone, Gianni A trip around the Yushukan, Japan’s font of discord July 28, 2014 The Japan Times Retrieved March 16, 2016
  7. ^ RailAsia blog
  8. ^ "The Death Railway Museum" on Travelfish website