Jewish Quarterly-Wingate Prize

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The Jewish Quarterly-Wingate Literary Prize is an annual British literary prize inaugurated in 1977. It is named after the host Jewish Quarterly and the prize's founder Harold Hyam Wingate.[1] The award recognizes Jewish and non-Jewish writers resident in the UK, British Commonwealth, Europe and Israel who "stimulate an interest in themes of Jewish concern while appealing to the general reader."[2] As of 2011 the winner receives £4,000.[1]

The Jewish Chronicle called it "British Jewry's top literary award,"[3] and Jewish World said it is a "prestigious literature prize."[4]

Winners[edit]

The blue ribbon Blue ribbon signifies the winner.

1996[edit]

Fiction[edit]

Non-fiction[edit]

  • Blue ribbon Theo Richmond, Konin: One Man's Quest for a Vanished Jewish Community (Jonathan Cape)

1997[edit]

1998[edit]

The shortlists comprised:[5]

Fiction[edit]

Non-fiction[edit]

1999[edit]

The shortlists comprised:[5]

Fiction[edit]

Non-fiction[edit]

2000[edit]

Fiction[edit]

Non-fiction[edit]

2001[edit]

The winners were announced on 30 April 2001. The shortlists comprised:[7]

Fiction[edit]

Non-fiction[edit]

2002[edit]

The winners were announced on 2 May 2002. The shortlists comprised:[8]

Fiction[edit]

Non-fiction[edit]

2003[edit]

The winners were announced on 8 May 2003. The shortlists comprised:[9]

Fiction[edit]

Non-fiction[edit]

2004[edit]

The winners were announced on 6 May 2004. The shortlists comprised:[10]

Fiction[edit]

Non-fiction[edit]

2005[edit]

The winners were announced on 17 May 2005.[4][11] The shortlists comprised:[12]

Fiction[edit]

Non-fiction[edit]

2006[edit]

The shortlist comprised:[13]

2007[edit]

The shortlist was announced on 25 February 2007.[14]

2008[edit]

The winner was announced on 5 May 2008. The shortlist comprised:[15]

2009[edit]

The shortlist was announced on 31 March 2009. The winner was announced on 6 June 2009.[2]

2010[edit]

The shortlist was announced on 22 April 2010.[16] The winner was announced on 16 June 2010.[17]

2011[edit]

The shortlist was announced on 4 April 2011.[3] The winner was announced on 6 June 2011.[1]

2012[edit]

2013[edit]

The winner was announced on 27 February 2013.[19] The shortlist comprised:[20]

2014[edit]

The shortlist was announced on 27 November 2013.[21] The winner was announced on 27 February 2014.[22]

2015[edit]

The shortlist was announced on 13 January 2015.[23] The winners - one each for fiction and non-fiction, in a departure from recent tradition since 2005 - were announced on 20 April 2015.[24]

Fiction[edit]

Non-fiction[edit]

2016[edit]

The short list was announced on 22 February 2016.[25] The winner was announced on 14 March 2016.[26]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Jewish Quarterly-Wingate Prize 2011
  2. ^ a b Jewish Quarterly-Wingate Prize 2009
  3. ^ a b Jennifer Lipman (April 4, 2011). "Howard Jacobson shortlisted for 'Jewish Booker' prize". The Jewish Chronicle. Retrieved September 27, 2012. 
  4. ^ a b Leslie Bunder (May 4, 2006). "Holocaust-based novel wins prestigious literary prize". Jewish World. Retrieved September 27, 2012. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f "Jewish Quarterly Literary Prize Winners 1996 – 2000 inclusive"
  6. ^ "News in Brief:Literary prize withdrawn for writer's 'work of fiction'". The Guardian. 29 April 2000. Retrieved September 27, 2012. 
  7. ^ "Wingate Literary Prize 2001"
  8. ^ "Wingate Literary Prize 2002"
  9. ^ "Wingate Literary Prize 2003"
  10. ^ "Wingate Literary Prize 2004"
  11. ^ "Winners of the Jewish Quarterly Wingate Literary Prize for 2005"
  12. ^ "The Quarterly Wingate Literary Prize 2005 Shortlists announcement". Jewish Quarterly. March 23, 2005. Retrieved November 30, 2013. 
  13. ^ "Winner of the 2006 Wingate Prize"
  14. ^ "Winner of the 2007 Wingate Literary Prize"
  15. ^ "Winner of the 2008 Wingate Literary Prize"
  16. ^ "JQ-Wingate Literary Prize Shortlist" (Press release). Book Trade. April 22, 2010. Retrieved November 30, 2013. 
  17. ^ Alexandra Coghlan (June 17, 2010). "Lived resistance: Adina Hoffman wins 2010 JQ-Wingate Prize". The New Statesman. Retrieved November 30, 2013. 
  18. ^ "From 2013, the prize will be awarded in February to enable the prize to coincide with Jewish Book Week.""Archived copy". Archived from the original on November 5, 2012. Retrieved January 23, 2013.  The previous ceremony was in June 2011.
  19. ^ Philip Maughan (February 28, 2013). "Shalom Auslander wins 2013 Wingate Prize". The New Statesman. Retrieved November 30, 2013. 
  20. ^ Jewish Quarterly-Wingate Prize 2013 Archived November 5, 2012, at the Wayback Machine.
  21. ^ "The 2014 Jewish Quarterly-Wingate Prize Shortlist" (Press release). Book Trade. November 27, 2013. Retrieved November 30, 2013. 
  22. ^ Jon Stock (February 27, 2014). "Otto Dov Kulka wins Jewish Quarterly-Wingate Prize 2014". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved February 28, 2014. 
  23. ^ Josh Jackman (January 13, 2015). "Authors from across the globe compete on JQ-Wingate prize shortlist". The Jewish Chronicle. 
  24. ^ Jackman, Josh (April 20, 2015). "Michel Laub and Thomas Harding win JQ-Wingate Prize for books on the Holocaust". The Jewish Chronicle. 
  25. ^ "Howard Jacobson among top authors on Jewish Quaterly's Wingate Prize shortlist". Jewish News. February 22, 2016. 
  26. ^ Fisher, Ben (March 14, 2016). "Nikolaus Wachsmann Wins Jewish Quarterly-Wingate Prize". Jewish Quarterly. 

External links[edit]