Jack Curtis (voice actor)

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Jack Curtis
Born June 16, 1926
Queens, New York, U.S.
Died September 1970 (1970-10) (aged 44)
Occupation Voice actor
Spouse(s) Paulette Rubinstein (1964-his death)
Children Liane Curtis

Jack Curtis, Jr. (June 16, 1926 – September 1970) was an American voice actor. He began his career as an actor in radio shows in the 1940s. He directed, produced, shot and edited the sci-fi thriller film The Flesh Eaters (1964). He did numerous voice-overs. His voice was featured in several cartoons, and he dubbed the voices for animated characters that included Kimba the White Lion, Marine Boy, and Speed Racer for the Japanese anime series in 1967.

He was born in Queens, New York, the son of theatrical agent Jack Curtis and vaudeville dancer Mabel Ford. His half sister was actress Beatrice Curtis (1901-1963), whose first husband was the vaudevillian actor Harry Fox of the dance the foxtrot. He was also the first cousin of magician Roy Benson who appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show.

Curtis started acting as a teenager in the early 1940s, performing in various radio shows, including Coast to Coast on a Bus, where he first met Peter Fernandez. Curtis never did on camera work because he was born with a defect to his hand, which had been wrapped up in the umbilical cord and never properly formed. He did play the piano, however.

In 1962, he made the cult classic The Flesh Eaters, which was released in 1964. Besides being credited as the film's director, he also wrote, edited, and provided camera work.

On December 31, 1964, he and actress Paulette Rubinstein were married. They had one child, Liane Curtis (born July 11, 1965), who became an actress.

Curtis was hired to dub voices for Anime's Speed Racer by his longtime friend Peter Fernandez. At the time he also provided voice-overs for the cartoon series Marine Boy. He had a company that was named Film Sync, and did a lot of dubbing work.

In September 1970, at the age of 44, Curtis died of pneumonia that he contracted in the hospital, which could not be treated as he was allergic to penicillin, the only antidote in 1970. He was remembered fondly by friends and co-workers alike, particularly for his sense of humor and practical jokes. Corinne Orr recalled, "He was so outrageous, and a warm and giving person."

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