Jack Daugherty (musician)

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Jack Daugherty
Born (1930-08-13)August 13, 1930
Died February 2, 1991(1991-02-02) (aged 60)
Carmel, California, United States
Genres Pop music, soft rock
Occupation(s) Musician, music producer
Instruments Trumpet
Labels A&M Records
Associated acts The Carpenters, Woody Herman

Jack Daugherty (August 13, 1930 – February 2, 1991) was a musician and producer who is best known for being the music producer of the band The Carpenters.

Early work[edit]

For most of his early professional career, Daugherty had worked as a trumpeter in Woody Herman's band. By the 1960s, he had all but retired from the music business, working in public relations at North American Aviation, an aircraft company with a location operating in the Los Angeles area. He went on to produce three albums: Jack Daugherty and the Class of Nineteen Hundred and Seventy One (referred to by Sounds as "a supersession of the finest studio musicians in Hollywood"[1]), on A&M Records, Carmel by the Sea, on the Monterey Label, and Romance, on Columbia Records, Japan, as his last known project.

The Carpenters[edit]

Though no longer actively involved in music, Daugherty still kept an open network with other performers throughout the years. One was John Pisano, guitarist of Herb Alpert's band The Tijuana Brass, and still a part of the A&M Records roster. Daugherty is credited with getting a demo tape of Karen and Richard Carpenter's work to Herb Alpert through Pisano.

He produced The Carpenters from 1969 with the release of Offering and continued until 1972, with the release of A Song for You. These early recordings carry the credits "Produced by Jack Daugherty" or "Produced by Jack Daugherty Productions".

Daugherty later put his differences with the band aside and attended the funeral of Karen Carpenter in 1983. He died on February 2, 1991 of complications during coronary bypass surgery.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Brass is Back". Sounds. Spotlight Publications. 28 August 1971. p. 3.