Jack Yerman

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Jack Yerman
Personal information
Full name Jack Lloyd Yerman
Born February 5, 1939 (1939-02-05) (age 78)
Oroville, California

Jack Lloyd Yerman (born February 5, 1939) is an American former athlete and winner of the gold medal in the 4×400 m relay at the 1960 Summer Olympics.

Jack Yerman was sixth in the 400 m at the 1959 Pan-American Games and won the silver medal as a member of an American 4×400 m relay team.[1]

He won the 1960 U.S. Olympic Trials 400 m at Stanford with a time of 46.3, but at the Olympics itself, he only reached the semifinals. Jack Yerman won a gold medal as the lead-off runner with the American 4×400 m relay team and set a new world record of 3:02.2.[2]

Yerman also played fullback for Berkeley in the Rose Bowl.[3]

Yerman currently lives in Paradise, California. He is a retired high school teacher and father of four.

He is a Latter-day Saint.[4] Yerman joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints after his participation in the Olympics.[5]

"Your Time Will Come: Jack Yerman and His Incredible Journey to the 1960 Olympics" is a book that relates his story from birth through winning the Gold Medal. See bhyerman.wix.com/books.

World records[edit]

  • Mile Relay
  • 1600 Meter Relay
  • Two Mile Relay
  • Distance Medley Relay
  • Indoor 400 Meter short track
  • 660 yard sprint (unofficial)

Major events[edit]

  • Olympic Gold Medal – 1600 meter relay 1960
  • Rose Bowl 1960
  • Pan American Games
(only Jack Yerman and Bob Mathias have accomplished all three of the above)
  • First US-USSR dual meet, 1958
  • Two Time Donkey Derby Champion

References[edit]

  1. ^ "United States – 1960 Summer Olympic Medals". databaseolympics.com. Retrieved 19 August 2009. 
  2. ^ "Jack Yerman Biography and Statistics". Sports Reference.com. Archived from the original on 1 September 2009. Retrieved 19 August 2009. 
  3. ^ "Cal sports hall of fame list". Big C (Sport). Retrieved 19 August 2009. 
  4. ^ Turino
  5. ^ LDS Church Almanac, 2009 Edition, p. 326