Jack Ross (writer)

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Jack Ross (born 6 November 1962 in Auckland), is a New Zealand poet, novelist, translator, editor and lecturer in creative writing.[1] A trilogy of novels has been published by two different publishers, Alan Brunton's Bumper Books (Volume 1) and Titus Books.

Biography[edit]

Born on Auckland's North Shore, Ross was raised and educated in the East Coast Bays. After completing degrees in English and Italian at the University of Auckland, Ross was given a Commonwealth Scholarship to study in the UK in[2] and was awarded a PhD in English and Comparative Literature by the University of Edinburgh. He is a Lecturer specialising in Academic and Creative Writing at Massey University's Albany campus.

From 2002 to 2005 Ross was editor of the literary magazine brief.[3] He has also edited other literary magazines The Pander (co-editor 1998–99),[4] Spin (co-editor 1999–2003),[5] Landfall (guest editor: issue 214, 2007),[6] and Poetry NZ (guest editor: issue 38, 2008).[7]

Criticism[edit]

Ross is little known outside New Zealand avant-garde literary circles. He was described by Richard Reeve in Landfall as "a leading contributor to the field of experimental writing in New Zealand",[8] Mark Houlahan remarked in New Zealand Books [15 (2) (June 2005): 14–15], that "Nobody else in New Zealand writes quite like Ross, though some of Bill Manhire's fictions in The New Land are precedents." Other reviewers have been less positive: Laurence Jenkins wrote that "Not all the contents are evil, but the spirit of darkness certainly prevails," about Nights with Giordano Bruno [in JAAM 16 (2001): 185]. According to Joe Wylie "Outside of literati farm, this sort of thing has a very limited life expectancy ... Can Ross move beyond this? Does he choose not to?" [Takahe 54 (2005) 63].

Works[edit]

  • City of Strange Brunettes. ISBN 0-473-05446-9 (Auckland: Pohutukawa Press, 1998) [poems]
  • (with Gabriel White) A Town like Parataxis. ISBN 0-473-07104-5 (Auckland: Perdrix Press, 2000) [poems / photos] [1]
  • Nights with Giordano Bruno. ISBN 0-9582225-0-9 (Wellington: Bumper Books, 2000) [novel (R.E.M. Trilogy, 1)] [2]
  • (with Gabriel White) The Perfect Storm. ISBN 0-473-07350-1 (Auckland: Perdrix Press, 2000) [poems / video]
  • The Writing Skills Workshop. prod. Robert van der Vyver (Otago University: Higher Education Development Centre, 2001) [workbook / video]
  • Chantal's Book. ISBN 0-473-08744-8 (Wellington: HeadworX, 2002) [poems] [3]
  • Monkey Miss Her Now. ISBN 0-476-00182-X (Auckland: Danger Publishing, 2004) [short stories]
  • Trouble in Mind. ISBN 0-9582586-1-9 (Auckland: Titus Books, 2005) [novella] [4]
  • A Bus Called Mr Nice Guy. ISBN 0-473-10526-8 (Auckland: Perdrix Press, 2005) [poems / travelogue]
  • The Imaginary Museum of Atlantis. ISBN 0-9582586-8-6 (Auckland: Titus Books, 2006) [novel (R.E.M. Trilogy, 2)] [5]
  • To Terezín. Social and Cultural Studies, 8. ISSN 1175-7132 (Auckland: Massey University, 2007) [poems / travelogue] [6]
  • Papyri: Love Poems & Fragments from Sappho. ISBN 978-0-473-12397-0 (Auckland: Soapbox Press, 2007)
  • EMO. ISBN 978-1-877441-07-3 (Auckland: Titus Books, 2008) [novel (R.E.M. Trilogy, 3)][9]
  • The Return of the Vanishing New Zealander. ISBN 978-0-9864507-6-1. (Dunedin: Kilmog Press, 2009) [poems]
  • Kingdom of Alt. ISBN 978-1-877441-15-8. (Auckland: Titus Books, 2010) [short stories / novella]

Jack Ross has also edited and co-edited a number of publications.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Jack Ross – Massey University". massey.ac.nz. 2011. Archived from the original on 16 June 2012. Retrieved 25 June 2011.
  2. ^ "New Zealand Book Council". bookcouncil.org.nz. 2011. Retrieved 25 June 2011.
  3. ^ "brief". nlnzcat.natlib.govt.nz. 2011. Archived from the original on 14 July 2012. Retrieved 25 June 2011.
  4. ^ "The Pander". nlnzcat.natlib.govt.nz. 2011. Archived from the original on 15 July 2012. Retrieved 25 June 2011.
  5. ^ "Spin : the quarterly magazine of Poetry Orbital Workshops". nlnzcat.natlib.govt.nz. 2011. Archived from the original on 11 July 2012. Retrieved 25 June 2011.
  6. ^ "Landfall 212. 'The Capital of Nowhere', Edited by Richard Reeve Otago University Press, New Zealand". otago.ac.nz. 2008. Retrieved 25 June 2011.
  7. ^ "Poetry New Zealand: Issue 38". poetrynz.net. 2011. Retrieved 25 June 2011.
  8. ^ "Otago University Press".
  9. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 21 July 2011. Retrieved 13 October 2008.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)

External links[edit]