Jack Wright (American football)

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Jack Wright
Jack Wright - Coach.jpg
Wright pictured in The Tyee 1903, Washington yearbook
Sport(s) Football
Biographical details
Born (1871-10-30)October 30, 1871
Moravia, New York
Died October 27, 1931(1931-10-27) (aged 59)
Auburn, New York
Alma mater Williams College (1897)
Columbia Law School (1902)
Playing career
1899–1900[1] Columbia
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1901 Washington
c. 1902 Columbia (assistant)
1903 Kentucky State College
Head coaching record
Overall 10–4

Charles A. "Jack" Wright[2] (October 30, 1871 – October 27, 1931)[3][4] was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of Washington in 1901 and at the University of Kentucky in 1903, compiling a career college football record of 10–4. Wright later worked as a judge after earning his degree from Columbia Law School in 1902. He died in 1931 after suffering a heart attack. At the time of his death, he was candidate for the Cayuga County judge as well as the city recorder for Auburn, New York.[5] He was interred in Indian Mound Cemetery in Moravia.

Head coaching record[edit]

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Washington (Independent) (1901)
1901 Washington 3–3
Washington: 3–3
Kentucky State College Blue and White (Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1903)
1903 Kentucky State College 7–1 0–0
Kentucky: 7–1 0–0
Total: 10–4

References[edit]

  1. ^ "COLUMBIA'S FOOTBALL PLANS. - Wright May Be on Hand to Assist Morley in the Coaching. - View Article - NYTimes.com". query.nytimes.com. Retrieved December 14, 2014. 
  2. ^ "English Athletes Watch Yale Football. - View Article - NYTimes.com". query.nytimes.com. Retrieved December 14, 2014. 
  3. ^ Wright, J.A. (1918). Historical Sketches of the Town of Moravia, from 1791 to 1918. Press of Cayuga County News. Retrieved December 14, 2014. 
  4. ^ Columbia University (1931). Columbia Alumni News. 23. Alumni Council of Columbia University. Retrieved December 14, 2014. 
  5. ^ Thomas Tryniski (August 31, 2007). "Old Fulton NY Post Cards" (PDF). Retrieved December 14, 2014. 

External links[edit]