Jacobus Vanderveer House

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Jacobus Vanderveer House
Jacobus Vanderveer House, Bedminister, NJ, south view.jpg
Jacobus Vanderveer House is located in Somerset County, New Jersey
Jacobus Vanderveer House
Jacobus Vanderveer House is located in New Jersey
Jacobus Vanderveer House
Jacobus Vanderveer House is located in the US
Jacobus Vanderveer House
Nearest city Pluckemin, New Jersey
Coordinates 40°40′0″N 74°38′42″W / 40.66667°N 74.64500°W / 40.66667; -74.64500Coordinates: 40°40′0″N 74°38′42″W / 40.66667°N 74.64500°W / 40.66667; -74.64500
Area 19 acres (7.7 ha)
Built 1779 (1779)
Architectural style Colonial, Federal
NRHP Reference # 95001137[1]
NJRHP # 2808[2]
Significant dates
Added to NRHP September 29, 1995
Designated NJRHP July 13, 1995

The Jacobus Vanderveer House, also known as Knox House, is a Federal style house located just north of the community of Pluckemin, in Bedminster Township, Somerset County, New Jersey at the junction of US 202 and 206 north of River Road.[3] The house is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Vanderveer /Knox House & Museum while owned by Bedminster Township, is operated under the direction of the Friends of the Jacobus Vanderveer House, a 501-C3 non-profit organization. The Jacobus Vanderveer House is situated on part of the 218 acres (0.88 km2) that make up River Road Park. The house was thought to be built somewhere in the mid-1770s by James (Jacobus) Vanderveer, son to Jacobus Vanderveer after the property was willed to him by his father.

The house is famous as being the winter residence for General Henry Knox during the winter of 1778-1779 while he was commanding Continental Army Artillery Cantonment and what is now known as America's first military training academy, the forerunner to the United States Military Academy at West Point. What was then known as the Pluckemin Continental Artillery Cantonment Site is near the Vanderveer/Knox house, which happens to be the only remaining original structure on the fringe of the cantonmnent.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ "New Jersey and National Registers of Historic Places - Somerset County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection - Historic Preservation Office. October 21, 2014. p. 1. 
  3. ^ Greiff, Constance M. (September 29, 1995). "NRHP Nomination: Jacobus Vanderveer House" (PDF). National Park Service.  "Accompanying 15 photos, from 1994." (PDF). 

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