Jadeidi-Makr

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Jadeidi-Makr
  • גֻ'דֵידָה-מַכְּר, Judeida-Makr
  • مكر جديده
Hebrew transcription(s)
 • ISO 259 Ǧudéida - Makkr
 • Also spelled Judeidi-Maker (official)
Makr-Jadeidi (unofficial)
Entrance to Jadeidi-Makr
Entrance to Jadeidi-Makr
Jadeidi-Makr is located in Israel
Jadeidi-Makr
Jadeidi-Makr
Coordinates: 32°56′0.14″N 35°8′28.73″E / 32.9333722°N 35.1413139°E / 32.9333722; 35.1413139Coordinates: 32°56′0.14″N 35°8′28.73″E / 32.9333722°N 35.1413139°E / 32.9333722; 35.1413139
Grid position 163/259 PAL
District Northern
Government
 • Type Local council (from 1990)
Area
 • Total 8,974 dunams (8.974 km2 or 3.465 sq mi)
Population (2008)
 • Total 18,200
Name meaning El Judeiyideh, the dyke, or coloured streak in the mountain side[1] el Mekr, from personal name[2]

Jadeidi-Makr or Makr-Jadeidi (Hebrew: גֻ'דֵידָה-מַכְּר; Arabic: مكر جديده‎) is an Arab local council formed by the merger of the two Arab towns of Makr and Jadeidi in 1990. It is located a few kilometers east of the city of Acre in the North District.

According to the Israel Central Bureau of Statistics, in 2008 the local council had a population of 18,200[3] and is 90% Muslim with a Christian minority of 10%.[4]

History[edit]

Under the names Makr Harsin[5] and al Hudeidah,[6] Makr and Jadeidi were mentioned as part of the domain of the Crusaders during the hudna between the Crusaders based in Acre and the Mamluk sultan al-Mansur (Qalawun) declared in 1283.[5] However, it is also possible that Makr Harsin in the original text referred to separate locations Makr and Harsini, the latter unidentified.[5]

Ottoman era[edit]

Incorporated into the Ottoman Empire in 1517, al-Makir appeared in the census of 1596, located in the Nahiya of Acca of the Liwa of Safad. The population was 22 households and 3 bachelors, all Muslim. They paid taxes on wheat, barley, summer crops, fruit trees, cotton, occasional revenues, goats and beehives; a total of 17000 Akçe.[7][8]

A map by Pierre Jacotin from Napoleon's invasion of 1799 showed both places, named as Makr and Sedid.[9]

In 1875 Victor Guérin visited El Mekr, and found it to have 350 inhabitants, half Muslim and half "Schismatic Greek".[10] He further noted that "In and about El Mekr are broken columns, the fragment of an ancient bas-relief, a little sarcophagus in terra cotta, and several sepulchral caves."[11] Jadeidi, which he called Djedeideh, he found to have 350 inhabitants.[12]

In 1881, the Palestine Exploration Fund's Survey of Western Palestine (SWP) described El Judeiyideh as "a village, built of stone, containing about eighty Moslems and twenty Christians, surrounded by olives and arable land, situated near the plain, .....with many cisterns for rain water to drink from."[13] El Mekr was described as "a village, built of stone, containing 100 Moslems and eighty Christians, situated at the edge of the plain, surrounded by olives and arable land; there are many cisterns for rain-water in the village."[14]

British Mandate era[edit]

In the 1922 census of Palestine conducted by the British Mandate authorities Al Judaida had a population of 204; 108 Muslims and 96 Christians.[15] Of the Christians, 51 were Orthodox and 45 Greek Catholic (Melchite).[16] Al Makr had a population of 281; 206 Muslims and 75 Christians.[15] Of the Christians, 30 were Orthodox and 45 Greek Catholic (Melchite).[16] In the 1931 census El Judeida had a population of 249; 146 Muslims and 103 Christians, in a total of 57 houses, while El Makr had a population of 331; 257 Muslims and 74 Christians, in a total of 77 houses.[17]

In 1945 the population of Judeida was 280, all Arabs, who owned 5,219 dunams of land according to an official land and population survey.[18] 1,855 dunams were plantations and irrigable land, 2,202 dunams were used for cereals,[19] while 39 dunams were built-up (urban) land.[20]

The same year the population of El Makr was 490, all Arabs, while 8,791 dunams of land belonged to the village according to the same official land and population survey.[18] 96 dunams were for citrus and bananas, 730 for plantations and irrigable land, 7,241 used for cereals,[21] while 26 dunams were built-up (urban) land.[22]

1948, and aftermath[edit]

Al-Makr was captured by the Israeli army during the first part of Operation Dekel, 8–14 July 1948,[23] and remained under Martial Law until 1966.

Mahmoud Darwish's family, who originated from the destroyed Arab village of al-Birwa, live in the town and Darwish was educated and raised there.[24]

Sports and culture[edit]

The town's main football team, Hapoel Bnei Jadeidi F.C., will start the 2011-12 season in the Israeli Liga Gimel (Israeli Fifth Division).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Palmer, 1881, p. 43
  2. ^ Palmer, 1881, p. 52
  3. ^ "Table 3 - Population of Localities Numbering Above 2,000 Residents and Other Rural Population" (PDF). Israel Central Bureau of Statistics. 2009-09-30. Retrieved 2010-01-29. 
  4. ^ Judeide-Maker Gutterman, Dov. CRW Flags.
  5. ^ a b c Barag, 1979, p. 204, No. 14
  6. ^ Barag, 1979, p. 204, No. 15
  7. ^ Hütteroth and Abdulfattah, 1977, p. 192
  8. ^ Note that Rhode, 1979, p. 6 writes that the Safad register that Hütteroth and Abdulfattah studied was not from 1595/6, but from 1548/9
  9. ^ Karmon, 1960, p. 162
  10. ^ Guérin, 1880, pp. 2-4
  11. ^ Guérin, 1880, pp. 2-4, as translated by Conder and Kitchener, 1881, SWP I, p. 191
  12. ^ Guérin, 1880, p. 14
  13. ^ Conder and Kitchener, 1881, SWP I, p. 146
  14. ^ Conder and Kitchener, 1881, SWP I, p. 147
  15. ^ a b Barron, 1923, Table XI, Sub-district of Acre, p. 36
  16. ^ a b Barron, 1923, Table XVI, p. 50
  17. ^ Mills, 1932, p. 101
  18. ^ a b Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 40
  19. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 80
  20. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 130
  21. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 81
  22. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 131
  23. ^ Morris, 1987, p. 198
  24. ^ Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish to be laid to rest in Ramallah Bar'el, Zvi. Haaretz. 2008-08-11.

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]