Jagat Seth

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Jagat Seth
Died1763
NationalityIndian
OccupationBusiness
Known forRole in Battle of Plassey
House of Jagat Seth

The Jagat Seth were a banking family and the title of the eldest son of the family. The family sometimes referred to as the House of Jagat Seth, were a wealthy business, banking and money lender family from Murshidabad, Bengal region in the eastern part of the Indian subcontinent, during the time of Nawab Siraj-ud-Daula.

The title[edit]

Jaget Seth was a title conferred by the Nawab of Bengal and can be interpreted as "banker of merchant of the world".[1] House of Jagat Seth Museum contains personal possessions of Jagat Seth and his family including coins of the bygone era, muslin and other extravagant clothes, Banarasi sarees embroidered with gold and silver threads.

Jagat Seth, also the title for the powerful moneylender family he belonged to, looked after the mint and treasury accounts of Bengal during the Nawabi period. He played a key role in the conspiracy involving the imprisonment and ultimate killing of Nawab Siraj-ud-Daulah. His house, replete with a secret underground tunnel as well as an underground chamber, where illegal trade plans were hatched, is what has been converted into the museum House of Jagat Seth Museum contains personal possessions of Jagat Seth and his family including coins of the bygone era, muslin and other extravagant clothes, Banarasi sarees embroidered with gold and silver threads.

Jagat Seth, also the title for the powerful moneylender family he belonged to, looked after the mint and treasury accounts of Bengal during the Nawabi period. He played a key role in the conspiracy involving the imprisonment and ultimate killing of Nawab Siraj-ud-Daulah. His house, replete with a secret underground tunnel as well as an underground chamber, where illegal trade plans were hatched, is what has been converted into the museum.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Asher, Catherine B.; Talbot, Cynthia (2006). India Before Europe. Cambridge University Press. p. 282. ISBN 978-0-521-80904-7.