Jagdstaffel 19

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Jasta 19
Active 1916–1918
Country German Empire
Branch Luftstreitkräfte
Type Fighter squadron
Part of Jagdgeschwader II
Engagements World War I
Leutnant Pippart, Jasta 19 Fokker Dr.I

Royal Prussian Jagdstaffel 19 was a World War I "hunting group" (i.e., fighter squadron) of the Luftstreitkräfte, the air arm of the Imperial German Army during World War I. As one of the original German fighter squadrons, the unit would score 92 verified aerial victories, including ten wins over enemy observation balloons.[1]

In turn, their casualties for the war would amount to eleven pilots killed in action, four wounded in action, and one taken prisoner of war.[1]

History[edit]

Royal Prussian Jagdstaffel 19 was founded on 25 October 1916. It flew its first combat patrols five days before Christmas, 1916.[2] The new Jasta drew first blood on 6 April 1917, credit being given to Leutnant Walter Böning.[2] On 2 February 1918, Jasta 19 was detailed into Jagdgeschwader II along with Jasta 12, Jasta 13, and Jasta 15.[2]

Commanding officers (Staffelführer)[edit]

  1. Obltn Franz Walz: 25 October 1916 – 28 November 1916
  2. Obltn Erich Hahn: transferred in from Jasta 1 on 28 November 1916 – 4 September 1917 (KIA)
  3. Eichorn (Acting) – September 1917
  4. Ernst Hess: transferred in from Jasta 28 in September 1917 – 23 December 1917 (KIA)
  5. Ltn d R Gerlt (Acting): 23 December 1917 – 2 February 1918
  6. Ltn Konrad von Bülow-Bothkamp: transferred in from Jasta 14 on 2 February 1918 – 14 February 1918
  7. Ltn d R Walter Göttsch: 14 February 1918 – 10 April 1918 (KIA)
  8. Ltn d R Arthur Rahn (Acting): 10 April 1918 – 18 April 1918
  9. Ltn d L Hans Martin Pippart: transferred in from Jasta 13 on 18 April 1918 – 20 May 1918
  10. Ltn d R Gerlt (Acting): 20 May 1918 – 11 June 1918
  11. Ltn d L Hans Pippart: 11 June 1918 – 11 August 1918 (KIA)
  12. Ltn d R Gerlt (Acting): 11 August 1918 – 12 August 1918
  13. Ltn d R Ulrich Neckel: transferred in from Jasta 2 on 12 August 1918 – transferred out on 1 September 1918
  14. Ltn Olivier Freiherr von Beaulieu-Marconnay: transferred in from Jasta 15 on 1 September 1918 – 18 October 1918 (WIA)
  15. Ltn d R Wilhelm Leusch (Acting): 18 October 1918 – 26 October 1918
  16. Ltn d R Wilhelm Leusch: 26 October 1918 – 11 November 1918[3]

Aerodromes[edit]

  1. Lagnicourt: 4 December 1916 – 11 December 1916
  2. Saarburg, Germany: 11 December 1916 – 19 March 1917
  3. Lothringen: 11 December 1916 – 19 March 1917[2]
  4. Le Thour, France: 19 March 1917 – Unknown date
  5. Saint-Fergeux, France: Unknown date – 30 June 1917
  6. Saint-Loup: 30 June 1917 – 2 February 1918.[3]
  7. Cuirieux: 2 February 1918 – 26 February 1918
  8. Toulis: 26 February 1918 – 19 March 1918.
  9. Guise: 19 March 1918 – Unknown date
  10. Roupy
  11. Guisecourt
  12. Balatre: Unknown date – 12 June 1918
  13. Mesnil-Bruntel: 12 June 1918 – 12 July 1918
  14. Leffincourt: 12 July 1918 – 24 July 1918
  15. Chery-les-Pouilly: 24 July 1918 – 10 August 1918
  16. Foreste: 10 August 1918 – Late August 1918
  17. Neuflize: Late August 1918 – 3 September 1918
  18. Tichemont: 3 September 1918 – 5 September 1918
  19. Stenay: 5 September 1918 – Unknown date
  20. Carigan
  21. Florenville
  22. Trier[4]

Notable members[edit]

Two of the members of Jasta 19 were holders of the Pour le Mérite ("Blue Max"); both of them commanded the unit at some point. They were:

  • Oliver von Beaulieu-Marconnay, winner of the Pour le Mérite and Iron Cross[5]
  • Ulrich Neckel, Pour le Mérite, Iron Cross[6]

One of Germany's pioneer pilots checked into the Jasta already bearing the Military Order of Saint Henry:

Four other aces in Jasta 19 won both the Hohenzollern Order and Iron Cross:

Other aces in the squadron were awarded the Iron Cross:

And there were aces who went unrewarded by medals, such as Rudolf Rienau and Hans Körner.[3]

Aircraft[edit]

Jasta 19 was founded with Albatros D.II fighters from its inception in December 1916.[3] The Fokker Dr.I fighter came on line in August 1917;[13] the unit was supplied with the triplane, although this re-equipment date is unknown. The Fokker D.VII fighter was supplied to combat units beginning in March or April 1918;[14] the squadron also received them at an unknown date.[3]

Operations[edit]

From Armee-Flugpark I, the squadron moved to the 1st Armee Sector on 4 December 1916. They were moved to Armee-Abteilung A Sector a week afterwards.[2]

On 19 March 1917, they were assigned to 7th Armee. It then moved back to the support of 1st Armee on 30 June.[2]

On 2 February 1918, as part of the formation of JG II, Jasta 19 returned to support of 7th Armee. On 19 March, the unit moved to the control of 18th Armee. On 12 June, they moved once more, to 2nd Armee support. A month later, it was 3rd Armee that needed the squadron. On 24 July, they moved to support of 9th Armee. It returned to the aid of 18th Armee on 10 August. By the end of August, the jasta had moved again, back to the aid of 1st Armee. On 3 September 1918, they went to the Armee-Abteilung C Front, but moved two days later to support 5th Armee for its final assignment.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Franks, Bailey & Guest (1993), p. 38.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Franks, Bailey & Guest (1993), p. 37.
  3. ^ a b c d e f "Jasta 19". The Aerodrome. 2015. Retrieved 17 December 2015. 
  4. ^ a b Franks, Bailey & Guest (1993), pp. 37–38.
  5. ^ "Olivier Freiherr von Beaulieu-Marconnay". The Aerodrome. 2015. Retrieved 17 December 2015. 
  6. ^ "Ulrich Neckel". The Aerodrome. 2015. Retrieved 17 December 2015. 
  7. ^ "Erich Hahn". The Aerodrome. 2015. Retrieved 17 December 2015. 
  8. ^ "Walter Böning". The Aerodrome. 2015. Retrieved 17 December 2015. 
  9. ^ "Ernst Hess". The Aerodrome. 2015. Retrieved 17 December 2015. 
  10. ^ "Walter Göttsch". The Aerodrome. 2015. Retrieved 17 December 2015. 
  11. ^ "Hans Martin Pippart". The Aerodrome. 2015. Retrieved 17 December 2015. 
  12. ^ "Arthur Rahn". The Aerodrome. 2015. Retrieved 17 December 2015. 
  13. ^ "Fokker DR.I". The Aerodrome. 2015. Retrieved 17 December 2015. 
  14. ^ "Fokker D.VII". The Aerodrome. 2015. Retrieved 17 December 2015. 
Bibliography
  • Franks, Norman; Bailey, Frank W. & Guest, Russell F. (1993). Above The Lines: The Aces and Fighter Units of the German Air Service, Naval Air Service, and Flanders Marine Corps, 1914–1918. London, UK: Grub Street. ISBN 978-0-948817-73-1.