Arrest of Jagtar Singh Johal

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Jagtar Singh Johal is a British Sikh activist. He was arrested in India for alleged involvement in the murders of Brigadier (retd) Jagdish Gagneja , RSS leader Ravinder Gosain and Pastor Sultan Masih and for funding of a banned terrorist outfit Khalistan Liberation Force. The Punjab Police suspects Johal’s involvement in these murders by funding and arranging weapons for the Khalistan Liberation Force. He was detained in November 2017 while he had come to India for his wedding. Sikh human rights groups in the Punjab and Diaspora and also several UK MPs have cried foul over the arrest. The Indian police are accused of torturing Johal whilst in custody. [1] Jaggi Johal ran a website called Never Forget 1984 in tribute to atrocities committed against the Sikh community across India in the mid eightiesand early nineties.[2][3] [4][5][6][7]

The National Investigation Agency (NIA) handling the case have filed an over 1,000-page charge sheet with charges related to Terrorism against Johal. The Indian government claims that few Indian origin British MPs are supporting Johal due to vote bank politics.[8] According to NIA the Dera Sacha Sauda chief Gurmeet Ram Rahim Singh was the prime target in one of his alleged conspiracies. In 2012 at France, the NIA also claim Johal had met Harminder Singh Mintoo, a member of Khalistan Liberation Force (KLF) a banned terrorist organisation to plan his murder. Mintoo was later arrested.[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Jagtar Singh Johal: A Scottish Sikh in a Punjab jail". Ishani Duttagupta. The Economic Times. 26 November 2017. Archived from the original on 28 January 2018. Retrieved 28 January 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  2. ^ "Targeted killings in Punjab: UK resident Johal was on police radar for a year". Ravinder Vasudeva. Hindustan Times. 15 November 2017. Archived from the original on 28 January 2018. Retrieved 28 January 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  3. ^ "NIA again gets Jaggi's custody for five days". Manish Sirhindi. The Times of India. 17 January 2018. Archived from the original on 1 June 2018. Retrieved 28 January 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  4. ^ "Sikh activist Jagtar Singh Johal filmed in police custody". BBC News. 9 December 2017. Archived from the original on 2 January 2018. Retrieved 28 January 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  5. ^ "Detained Sikh activist's family speak out". BBC News. 25 January 2018. Archived from the original on 25 January 2018. Retrieved 28 January 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  6. ^ "Why diaspora Sikhs are fighting to 'Free Jaggi'". Navjeevan Gopal. The Indian Express. 29 November 2017. Archived from the original on 29 January 2018. Retrieved 28 January 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  7. ^ "Why are Indian officials banned from Sikh Gurdwaras?". Al Jazeera. 11 January 2018. Archived from the original on 27 January 2018. Retrieved 28 January 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  8. ^ Chaudhury, Dipanjan Roy (13 July 2018). "India rejects UK leniency plea for 'terrorist' Jagtar Singh Johal". Archived from the original on 27 July 2018. Retrieved 26 July 2018 – via The Economic Times. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  9. ^ "Targeted killings: Jagtar Singh Johal remanded in three-day custody of NIA". 20 December 2017. Archived from the original on 15 February 2018. Retrieved 27 July 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)