Jahangir Khan

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Jahangir Khan
Jahangir Khan Image by Faizan Munawar Varya.jpg
Jahangir Khan in Karachi, 2020
Nickname(s)JK
Country Pakistan
ResidenceKarachi, Pakistan
Born (1963-12-10) 10 December 1963 (age 56)
Retired1993
Racquet usedUnsquashable
Men's singles
Highest rankingNo. 1
World OpenW (1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1988)
1st Emeritus President of the
World Squash Federation
Assumed office
2008
Preceded byPost created
7th President of the
World Squash Federation
In office
2002–2008
Preceded byNew Zealand Susie Simcock
Succeeded byIndia Narayana Ramachandran
Last updated on: 28 April 2020.

Jahangir Khan ( Urdu: جهانگير خان‎; born 10 December 1963) is a former World No. 1 professional Pakistani squash player. He won the World Open six times, and the British Open ten times. Jahangir Khan is widely regarded as the greatest squash player of all time.[1][2][3]

Early life[edit]

Khan was born into Pashtun family from Neway Kelay Payan, Peshawar.[4][5] During his career he won the World Open six times and the British Open a record ten times. He retired as a player in 1993, and has served as President of the World Squash Federation from 2002 to 2008. Later in 2008, he became Emeritus President of the World Squash Federation.[6]

He is the son of Roshan Khan, brother of Torsam Khan and a cousin of both Rehmat Khan and British singer Natasha Khan (better known as Bat for Lashes).[7]

Career[edit]

Khan was coached initially by his father Roshan, the 1957 British Open champion, then by his brother Torsam. After his brother's sudden death he was coached by his cousin Rehmat, who guided Khan through most of his career. In 1979, the Pakistan selectors decided not to select Khan to play in the world championships in Australia[8] but he entered the World Amateur Individual Championship, at the age of 15, he became the youngest-ever winner of that event. In November 1979, Torsam Khan, who had been one of the leading international squash players in the 1970s, died suddenly of a heart attack during Australian Open match in Adelaide Australia. Torsam's death profoundly affected Khan. He considered quitting the game, but decided to pursue a career in the sport as a tribute to his brother.[9]

He retired as a player in 1993, and has served as President of the World Squash Federation from 2002 to 2008, later became Emeritus President.[10][11]

World Open final appearances[edit]

Wins (6)
Year Opponent in final Score in final
1981 Geoff Hunt 7–9, 9–1, 9–2, 9–2
1982 Dean Williams 9–2, 6–9, 9–1, 9–1
1983 Chris Dittmar 9–3, 9–6, 9–0
1984 Qamar Zaman 9–0, 9–3, 9–4
1985 Ross Norman 9–4, 4–9, 9–5, 9–1
1988 Jansher Khan 9–6, 9–2, 9–2
Runners-up (3)
Year Opponent in final Score in final
1986 Ross Norman 5–9, 7–9, 9–7, 1–9
1991 Rodney Martin 17–14, 9–15, 4–15, 13–15
1993 Jansher Khan 15–14, 9–15, 5–15, 5–15

British Open final appearances[edit]

Wins (10)
Year Opponent in final Score in final
1982 Hiddy Jahan 9–2, 10–9, 9–3
1983 Gamal Awad 9–2, 9–5, 9–1
1984 Qamar Zaman 9–0, 9–3, 9–5
1985 Chris Dittmar 9–3, 9–2, 9–5
1986 Ross Norman 9–6, 9–4, 9–6
1987 Jansher Khan 9–6, 9–0, 9–5
1988 Rodney Martin 9–2, 9–10, 9–0, 9–1
1989 Rodney Martin 9–2, 3–9, 9–5, 0–9, 9–2
1990 Rodney Martin 9–6, 10–8, 9–1
1991 Jansher Khan 2–9, 9–4, 9–4, 9–0
Runners-up (1)
Year Opponent in final Score in final
1981 Geoff Hunt 2–9, 7–9, 9–5, 7–9

Honors and awards[edit]

  • 1981 – At age 17 became the youngest winner of the World Open, beating Australia's Geoff Hunt in final.[12]
  • 1984 – Featured on a Government of Pakistan issued postage stamp.[13]
  • 1999 – Sport and Youth Award by French Government[14]
  • 2005 - Times Award - Time Magazine named Khan as one of Asia's Heroes in the last 60 years.[15]
  • 2007 – Awarded an honorary degree of Doctorate of Philosophy by London Metropolitan University.[16]
  • 2017 – Featured on a Government of Japan issued commemorative stamp[17]
  • 2018 – Winner of the 8th Asian Award for Outstanding Achievement in Sport[18]

Philanthropy[edit]

In 2018, Khan became global President of Shahid Afridi Foundation (SAF) in a ceremony held at Japan. SAF was founded by former cricketer Shahid Afridi which aims to provide healthcare and education facilities in Pakistan. [19]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Greatest player". Squashsite. Retrieved 2 March 2010.
  2. ^ Jahangir injury hastens final exit, The Independent, 24 September 1992
  3. ^ Jahangir Khan hopes for squash's 2016 Olympic debut, Webindia123.com, 26 August 2008
  4. ^ Hafiz, Javed. "The civil society has developed into a formidable force". Archived from the original on 27 November 2010. Retrieved 2 March 2010.
  5. ^ Poor Peshawar village home of squash dynasty. Central Asia Online. 15 March 2010.
  6. ^ "Officers". World Squash Federation. Archived from the original on 18 September 2018. Retrieved 2 March 2015.
  7. ^ "Bat for Lashes: off the wall". The Daily Telegraph. London. 26 February 2009.
  8. ^ "Jahangir The Conquerer". emel.com. Retrieved 9 March 2016.
  9. ^ "Jahangir Khan Pakistan's Squash Legend Who Took Sport to New Heights". Daily Times. Retrieved 1 July 2017.
  10. ^ "Officers". World Squash Federation. Archived from the original on 18 September 2018. Retrieved 2 March 2015.
  11. ^ "When was Jahangir Khan born?". Britannica.com. Retrieved 2 March 2010.
  12. ^ Japan issues commemorative stamp to celebrate Jahangir Khan’s career
  13. ^ [https://www.dawn.com/news/1230727 Postage stamp pf Rs.3 depicts Pakistan's youngest world squash champion Jahangir Khan in 1984 Retrieved January 05, 2016, Daily Dawn
  14. ^ Another honour for legendary Jahangir Khan Retrieved, The Business Recorder
  15. ^ Poncha, Cyrus (15 November 2005). "Time Magazine Asian Hero: Jahangir Khan".
  16. ^ Honour for Jahangir Khan Retrieved, 12 August 2007, Dawn News
  17. ^ "Japan issues commemorative stamp to celebrate Jahangir Khan's career". Geo TV. Retrieved 1 December 2017.
  18. ^ Jehangir Khan gets Outstanding Achievement in Sport Award Retrieved, The News International
  19. ^ Shahid Afridi, Jahangir Khan come forward to help minorities in fighting pandemic Retrieved, The Statesman, 5th April 2020

External links[edit]

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Qamar Zaman
Jansher Khan
Jansher Khan
Jansher Khan
Jansher Khan
World No. 1
January 1982 - December 1987
November 1988 - October 1989
March 1990 - April 1990
July 1990 - October 1990
January 1992 - April 1992
Succeeded by
Jansher Khan
Jansher Khan
Jansher Khan
Jansher Khan
Jansher Khan