Jahsh ibn Riyab

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Jahsh ibn Riyab was a companion of Muhammad.

Originally from the Asad ibn Khuzayma tribe,[1] he settled in Mecca and formed an alliance with Harb ibn Umayya, chief of the leading clan of the Quraysh tribe. He married Umama bint Abdulmuttalib, a member of the Hashim clan and aunt of Muhammad,[2] and they had six children.

  1. Abdullah.[3][4][5][6]
  2. Ubaydullah.[7][8][9]
  3. Zaynab, later a wife of Muhammad.[10][11][12][13][14][15]
  4. Abd, always known as an adult by his kunya, Abu Ahmad.[16][17][18][19]
  5. Habiba, also known as Umm Habib.[20][21]
  6. Hamna.[22][23][24]

It is said that Jahsh emigrated to Abyssinia and joined Sa'd ibn Abi Waqqas in overseas preaching. “The Chams of Cambodia ascribe their conversion to one of the fathers-in-law of Muhammad”[25] named "Geys" (Jahsh). “The Chinese Muhammadans have a legend that their faith was first preached in China by a maternal uncle of the Prophet, and his reputed tomb at Canton is highly venerated by them.”[26] What later generations misconstrued as the tomb of "Geys" appears to have been a mausoleum dedicated to his memory in Hami, 400 miles east of Ürümqi in Xinxiang.[27]

However, “there is not the slightest historical base for this legend.”[28] Jahsh is not even listed among those who emigrated to Abyssinia,[29] although it may be that he departed permanently from Mecca independently from the general emigration.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Muhammad ibn Ishaq, Sirat Rasul Allah. Translated by Guillaume, A. (1955). The Life of Muhammad, p. 116. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  2. ^ Muhammad ibn Saad, Tabaqat, vol. 8. Translated by Bewley, A. (1995). The Women of Madina, p. 33. London: Ta-Ha Publishers.
  3. ^ Guillaume/Ishaq, pp. 116, 146, 168, 215-217, 230, 286-289, 388, 401.
  4. ^ Bewley/Saad, p. 173.
  5. ^ Watt/McDonald/Tabari, p. 139.
  6. ^ Al-Tabari, Tarikh al-Rusul wa'l-Muluk, vol. 7. Translated by McDonald, M. V. (1987). The Foundation of the Community, pp. 18-23, 29, 134, 137. New York: State University of New York Press.
  7. ^ Guillaume/Ishaq, pp. 99, 146, 529.
  8. ^ Bewley/Saad, p. 68.
  9. ^ Poonawala/Tabari, p. 133.
  10. ^ Guillaume/Ishaq, pp. 215, 495.
  11. ^ Ibn Hisham note 918.
  12. ^ Bewley/Saad, pp. 72-81.
  13. ^ Al-Tabari, Tarikh al-Rusul wa'l-Muluk, vol. 8. Translated by Fishbein, M. (1997). The Victory of Islam, pp. 1-4, 61. New York: State University of New York Press.
  14. ^ Al-Tabari, Tarikh al-Rusul wa'l-Muluk, vol. 9. Translated by Poonawala, I. K. (1990). The Last Years of the Prophet, pp. 23, 127, 134, 137, 168. New York: State University of New York Press.
  15. ^ Al-Tabari, Tarikh al-Rusul wa'l-Muluk, vol. 39. Translated by Landau-Tasseron, E. (1998). Biographies of the Prophet's Companions and Their Successors, pp. 9, 180-182. New York: State University of New York Press.
  16. ^ Guillaume/Ishaq, pp. 116, 215-217, 230.
  17. ^ Ibn Hisham note 918.
  18. ^ Bewley/Saad, pp. 33, 80-81.
  19. ^ Al-Tabari, Tarikh al-Rusul wa'l-Muluk, vol. 6. Translated by Watt, W. M., & McDonald, M. V. (1988). Muhammad at Mecca, p. 139.
  20. ^ Guillaume/Ishaq, pp. 215, 523.
  21. ^ Bewley/Saad, pp. 170-171.
  22. ^ Guillaume/Ishaq, pp. 215, 389, 495, 499, 522.
  23. ^ Bewley/Saad, pp. 33, 170.
  24. ^ Fishbein/Tabari, pp. 61, 63.
  25. ^ Arnold, T. W. (1913). The Preaching of Islam: A History of the Propagation of the Muslim Faith, 2nd Ed., p. 296 f3. London: Constable & Company Ltd.
  26. ^ Arnold (1913), p. 296.
  27. ^ see en.chinaxinjiang.cn/02/01/201007/t201
  28. ^ Arnold (1913), p. 296.
  29. ^ Guillaume/Ishaq pp. 146-148.