Jamboard

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Jamboard
Two squares are on top of each other, connected to a circle that gives a crude appearance of a "J".
Also known asGoogle Jamboard
DeveloperGoogle
ManufacturerGoogle
Product familyGoogle Workspace
TypeInteractive whiteboard
Release dateMay 23, 2017 (2017-05-23)
Display55" 4K (60 Hz)
Input
  • Stylus
  • eraser
  • touch
CameraHD camera
Online servicesGoogle Workspace
Website
Jamboard at SWPS University

Jamboard is a digital interactive whiteboard developed by Google to work with Google Workspace, formerly known as G Suite. It was officially announced on 25 October 2016. It has a 55" 4K touchscreen display and can be used for online collaboration using Google Workspace. The display can also be mounted onto a wall or be configured into a stand.

Hardware[edit]

Technical Specifications
Display Size 55"
Display Quality 4K
Display Refresh Rate 60 Hz
Display Touch Capabilities Up to 16 points
Wi-Fi Yes
Clear scanner HD front-facing camera
Microphone Built-In Microphone
Speakers Built-In Speakers
Stylus Dedicated Stylus
Eraser Eraser [Digital]
Main Controller Ability to open a 'Jam'

Operating system[edit]

Jamboard has an operating system that coincides with the Google Workspace ecosystem. Any service compatible with Google Workspace can also be performed on the device.[1]

Release[edit]

Jamboard was released in May 2017, and retails for £3,999 or about $5,000 with a $600 yearly support fee.[2][3]

History[edit]

After Google Apps for Work was launched in 2006, the subscription-based service was announced to be re-branded as G Suite on 29 September 2016, alongside announcements of machine learning integration into Drive's programs, a redesign of Hangouts and the announcement of Team Drive.[4]

On 25 October, Product Manager of G Suite TJ Varghese announced Jamboard on Google's official blog.[5] The announcement trailer for the product was released the same day onto YouTube.[6] The website was also launched on the same day simultaneously, as well as a rumored version of an "Early Adopter Program" for the device.[7]

Online service[edit]

Jamboard, more commonly known as Google Jamboard in this use case, is also available as a service to anyone with a Google account.

How to Access[edit]

The service can be found in the app tray on the Google home page, or by going to https://jamboard.google.com/.

Features[edit]

Once on the landing page, a user is able to create a 'Jam' where they are able to draw, create shapes, lines, and add text. The user can also choose between four pen types and six colors. There are also tools provided to erase and move objects, as well as create digital sticky notes, and turn their touchpoint into a digital laser pointer.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Merriman, Chris (28 October 2016). "Google Updates: Jamboard, jammed Vista, jammin' with Assistant". The Inquirer. Archived from the original on October 29, 2016. Retrieved 28 October 2016.CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  2. ^ Warren, Tom (25 October 2015). "Google's answer to Microsoft's Surface Hub is an equally giant digital whiteboard". The Verge. Retrieved 28 October 2016 – via Vox Media.
  3. ^ "Google releases Jamboard, a high-tech whiteboard for office meetings". Toronto Star, November 12, 2016. pageB4. Steven Overly.
  4. ^ Perez, Sarah (29 September 2016). "Google rebrands its business apps as G Suite, upgrades apps & announces Team Drive". TechCrunch. Retrieved 28 October 2016 – via Aol.
  5. ^ Varghese, TJ (25 October 2016). "Jamboard — the whiteboard, reimagined for collaboration in the cloud". Google. Retrieved 28 October 2016.
  6. ^ "Introducing Jamboard". YouTube. 25 October 2016. Retrieved 28 October 2016.
  7. ^ Vijayan, Jaikumar (27 October 2016). "Google Intros Jamboard Digital Collaboration Device". eweek. Retrieved 28 October 2016.
  8. ^ "Sign in - Google Accounts". accounts.google.com. Retrieved 2021-03-24.