James Bilsborrow

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The Most Reverend
James Romanus Bilsborrow
O.S.B.
Archbishop of Cardiff
Church Roman Catholic
Archdiocese Cardiff
Appointed 7 February 1916
In office 1916-1920
Predecessor First Archbishop
Successor Francis Mostyn
Other posts Titular Archbishop of Cius
Orders
Ordination 23 June 1889
Consecration 24 February 1911
by John Hedley
Rank Metropolitan Archbishop
Personal details
Born (1862-08-27)August 27, 1862
Walton-le-Dale, England
Died June 19, 1931(1931-06-19) (aged 68)
Nationality English
Previous post Bishop of Port-Louis (1911-1916)
Styles of
James Romanus Bilsborrow
Mitre (plain).svg
Reference style The Most Reverend
Spoken style Your Grace
Religious style Archbishop

James Romanus Bilsborrow, O.S.B. (27 August 1862 – 19 June 1931) was an English Roman Catholic prelate and Benedictine priest. He served as the first Archbishop of Cardiff (1916–1920), having previously been Bishop of Port-Louis (1916–1920).[1]

Born in Preston, Lancashire on 27 August 1862, he was ordained a priest in the Order of Saint Benedict on 23 June 1889. He was appointed the Bishop of the Diocese of Port-Louis in Mauritius on 13 September 1910. His consecration to the Episcopate took place on 24 February 1911, the principal consecrator was John Cuthbert Hedley, Bishop of Newport, and the principal co-consecrators were Peter Augustine O’Neill, Bishop Emeritus of Port-Louis and Joseph Robert Cowgill, Bishop of Leeds. Six years later, Bilsborrow was appointed the first Archbishop of Cardiff on 7 February 1916.[1]

He resigned the post on 16 December 1920 and appointed Titular Archbishop of Cius. He died on 19 June 1931, aged 68.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Archbishop James Romanus Bilsborrow, O.S.B.". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved 26 June 2011. 
Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
John Tuohill Murphy
Bishop of Port-Louis
1910–1916
Succeeded by
Peter Augustine O’Neill
New title Archbishop of Cardiff
1916–1920
Succeeded by
Francis Mostyn