James Broadwood Lyall

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Sir James Broadwood Lyall, GCIE, KCSI, (6 March 1838 – 4 December 1916) was an administrator in the Indian Civil Service during the British Raj.

Biography[edit]

James Lyall was born in Merstham, Surrey, the son of Alfred Lyall and Mary Drummond. His elder brother was Alfred Comyn Lyall.[1] He was educated first at Eton College and then Haileybury College.[2]

He joined the Bengal Civil Service in 1857, arriving in India the following year. [3] In 1859 he was posted to the Punjab commission and went on to serve as the financial commissioner of the Punjab.[4] Between 1883 and 1887 he served in southern India as the Resident in Mysore and Chief Commissioner of Coorg.[5] On 2 April 1887, Lyall commenced his tenure as Lieutenant Governor of the Punjab.[6][7][8][9][10][11][12][13] Lyall helped develop and founded many of the Canal colonies throughout the Punjab, an ambitious plan to harness the rivers of the region and transform six million acres of desert into agricultural land.[14] He was made a Knight Commander of the Indian Empire in 1888 and elavated to Knight Grand Commander of the Indian Empire in 1893. That same year he was appointed to the Royal Commission on Opium.[15] In 1898 he served as President of the Indian Famine Commission.[16]

He died on 4 December 1916 in Eastry, Kent and is buried in the local churchyard.[17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Lyall, Sir Alfred Comyn James". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/34641.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  2. ^ Dictionary of Indian Biography
  3. ^ Paul C. Winther, Anglo-European Science and the Rhetoric of Empire: Malaria, Opium, and British Rule in India, 1756-1895, Lexington Books, 2005, p.135
  4. ^ Paul C. Winther, Anglo-European Science and the Rhetoric of Empire: Malaria, Opium, and British Rule in India, 1756-1895, Lexington Books, 2005, p.135
  5. ^ Paul C. Winther, Anglo-European Science and the Rhetoric of Empire: Malaria, Opium, and British Rule in India, 1756-1895, Lexington Books, 2005, p.135
  6. ^ C.E. Buckland, Dictionary of Indian Biography, Haskell House Publishers Ltd, 1968, p.257
  7. ^ Great Britain. India Office, The India List and India Office List for 1905, Harrison and Sons, 1905, p.132
  8. ^ Michael O'Dwyer, India as I Knew it: 1885-1925, Mittal Publications, 1988, p.49
  9. ^ J. S. Grewal, The Sikhs of the Punjab, Volumes 2-3, Cambridge University Press, 8 Oct 1998 - History, p.258
  10. ^ Paul C. Winther, Anglo-European Science and the Rhetoric of Empire: Malaria, Opium, and British Rule in India, 1756-1895, Lexington Books, 2005, p.136
  11. ^ http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/fa18a04c-9ac2-482d-b386-f62ef8c2a589
  12. ^ http://www.telegraph.co.uk/comment/personal-view/3632887/Notebook.html
  13. ^ https://www.thegazette.co.uk/Edinburgh/issue/10365/page/678/data.pdf
  14. ^ Ian Talbot, Punjab Under Colonialism, Page 7
  15. ^ First report of the Royal Commission on Opium: with Minutes of evidence and appendices. London, UK: HMSO. 1894. Retrieved 23 November 2011. 
  16. ^ Dictionary of Indian Biography
  17. ^ Paul C. Winther, Anglo-European Science and the Rhetoric of Empire: Malaria, Opium, and British Rule in India, 1756-1895, Lexington Books, 2005, p.135

External links[edit]