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James Charles (Internet personality)

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James Charles
James Charles (2019) (cropped).png
Charles in 2019
Born
James Charles Dickinson

(1999-05-23) May 23, 1999 (age 22)
NationalityAmerican
Occupation
Years active2015–present
YouTube information
Channel
Genre
Subscribers24.7 million[1]
Total views3.5 billion[1]
YouTube Silver Play Button 2.svg 100,000 subscribers 2016
YouTube Gold Play Button 2.svg 1,000,000 subscribers 2017
YouTube Diamond Play Button.svg 10,000,000 subscribers 2018

Updated: September 3, 2021

James Charles Dickinson (born May 23, 1999) is an American beauty YouTuber and makeup artist. While working as a local makeup artist in his hometown of Bethlehem, New York, he started a YouTube channel, posting makeup tutorials. In 2016, he became the first male brand ambassador for CoverGirl after a tweet featuring his makeup went viral online.

In 2020, he hosted, directed, and co-produced the YouTube Originals reality competition series Instant Influencer. He has released an eyeshadow palette and created a makeup line in collaboration with Morphe Cosmetics, and has received numerous awards for his work on social media, including two People's Choice Awards, three Streamy Awards, one Shorty Award, and one Teen Choice Award.

His career has included multiple online controversies, including a widely publicized feud with fellow beauty YouTuber Tati Westbrook in 2019. In 2021, he admitted to sexting with two underage boys after a series of allegations came out against him, though he denied knowing their age at the time. Morphe cut ties with Charles and YouTube temporarily demonetized his channel.

Early life

Charles was born on May 23, 1999[2][3][4] in Bethlehem, New York, United States[5] to parents Skip, a contractor,[6] and Christine Dickinson.[7] He has a younger brother, Ian Jeffrey, who is now a model.[8][9] He attended Bethlehem Central High School, where he graduated in 2017.[5] Describing his high school experience, he stated, "I did get bullied a lot in high school and personally, I just ignored it."[7] Charles began working as an amateur hairstylist and started doing makeup after being asked by a friend to do her makeup for a school dance. After teaching himself how to apply makeup, he soon began doing it professionally for girls in his area.[6][10]

Career

In December 2015, Charles started a YouTube channel where he began posting makeup tutorials.[10] A tweet of him retaking his senior portrait with a ring light and makeup on went viral in September 2016.[11] In October 2016, when he was 17, Charles became the first male brand ambassador for cosmetics brand CoverGirl.[12][13] The appointment was met with significant praise on social media. His first appearance was in advertisements for CoverGirl's So Lashy mascara.[14] He started a clothing line, Sisters Apparel, and a makeup collection, the Sister Collection, made in collaboration with cosmetics brand Morphe Cosmetics, in November 2018.[7][15]

By early 2019, he had 10 million subscribers on YouTube.[16] His January 2019 visit to Birmingham for the opening of Morphe Cosmetics' second UK store caused gridlock in the city center.[17] Charles did Australian rapper Iggy Azalea's makeup for promotional art for her single "Sally Walker" in March 2019 and appeared in the song's music video.[18][19] He announced he would go on the Sisters Tour throughout the US in April 2019.[20] However, the tour was canceled the following month following a highly publicized feud with American social media personality Tati Westbrook.[21]

Charles hosted the first season of the YouTube Originals reality competition series Instant Influencer, which premiered on his YouTube channel.[22] For his work on the show, he won the award for Show of the Year at the 10th Streamy Awards.[23] In March 2021, YouTube announced he would not return to host the second season of the show.[22][24][25] In October 2020, Charles made a cameo appearance in the music video for American social media personality Larray's single "Canceled".[26]

Since the launch of his channel, Charles has made a number of collaborative videos, doing makeup on and with various public figures including: Kim Kardashian, Kylie Jenner,[27] Lil Nas X,[28] Kesha,[29] Madison Beer,[30] Doja Cat,[31] JoJo Siwa,[32] Charli D'Amelio, Addison Rae,[25] Trixie Mattel,[33] Avani Gregg,[34] Bretman Rock,[35] and Plastique Tiara.[36]

In January 2021, Charles sang a cover of "Drivers License".[37][38]

Public image

Early in his career, Charles received attention for being a young male makeup artist.[10][14] Todd Spangler of Variety called him "YouTube's most famous beauty vlogger". Writing for the Irish Independent, Caitlin McBride remarked that he "spearheaded a makeup revolution among men", while Amelia Tait of The Guardian wrote that his online platform was "arguably revolutionary".[39][40] Teen Vogue referred to Charles in 2019 as "one of the most famous YouTube makeup artists and beauty influencers around", while Noelle Faulkner of Vogue Australia wrote in 2018 that he had "one of the most engaged followings on YouTube".[29][41]

Charles refers to his fans as "sisters".[42] He has cited Jaclyn Hill and Nikkie de Jager as his biggest influences.[43] He has said that, for him, makeup is "a creative outlet and an art form".[44] Throughout his career Charles has been the focus of multiple controversies.[45]

Tati Westbrook feud

In 2019, Tati Westbrook, a fellow makeup artist and frequent collaborator with Charles, uploaded a 43-minute video titled BYE SISTER, accusing him of disloyalty and attempting to seduce a heterosexual man. YouTuber Jeffree Star and singer Zara Larsson corroborated Westbrook's claims and Charles became the first YouTuber to lose one million subscribers in 24 hours.[46][47][48][49] Charles uploaded an 8-minute apology video to Westbrook, which became one of the most disliked videos on YouTube before it was deleted.[50][51] He posted a second 41-minute video titled No More Lies addressing and refuting the comments made by Westbrook, which led to renewed online support for Charles and criticism of Westbrook.[52][53][54] Westbrook later removed the original video and, in 2020, posted a follow-up video in which she stated that Star and Shane Dawson manipulated her into making the original video.[55][56] This series of events sparked media analysis relating to cancel culture, the alleged toxicity of YouTube's beauty community, stereotypes of gay men as predatory, and the profits made from online feuds.[57][58][59]

Sexting allegations

In early 2021, several 15- to 17-year-old boys accused Charles of sending unsolicited nude photos and pressuring them into sexting with him.[60][61][62][63][45] On April 1, 2021, Charles posted a 14-minute-long video titled holding myself accountable [sic], in which he stated he did send sexually explicit messages to "two different people, both under the age of 18", though he denied knowing they were underage at the time.[45][64] Charles called his past behavior "reckless" and "desperate", stating, "to the guys involved in the situation, I wanna say I'm sorry. I'm sorry that I flirted with you and I'm really sorry if I ever made you uncomfortable. It is completely unacceptable".[65][66][67][68] Later that month, Morphe released a statement saying they would cut business ties with Charles and YouTube temporarily demonetized Charles's channel.[69][70][71][72] Charles returned to YouTube with a video titled An Open Conversation on July 2, 2021.[73][74][75][76]

Kelly Rocklein lawsuit

In a May 2021 lawsuit, Kelly Rocklein said that she was overworked illegally when working as a producer for Charles in 2018. The suit also states she was wrongfully dismissed from her job following an injury, that she was not paid the minimum wage (and sometimes not paid at all), and that she was seeking damages for emotional distress. Charles denied these allegations, and has refused to pay a settlement. The response by Charles initiated much backlash against Rocklein, including death threats and demands she kill herself.[77][78][79]

Personal life

Charles came out as gay to his parents at age 12.[80] Addressing questions about his gender identity, he stated, "I'm confident in myself and my gender identity – [I'm] happy being a boy. But at the same time, I love makeup. I have a full set of nails on all the time."[7] As of 2019, his net worth was estimated to be US$12 million.[50][81] In 2020, he purchased a US$7 million mansion in Los Angeles.[82]

Filmography

Television roles
Year Title Role Notes Ref.
2018 Alone Together Jasper Episode: "Pop-Up" [83]
Web roles
Year Title Role Notes Ref.
2018 The Secret World of Jeffree Star Himself Episode: "Becoming Jeffree Star for a Day" [84]
2020 Nikita Unfiltered Himself Episode: "James Charles Confronts Nikita" [85][better source needed]
2020 Instant Influencer Judge Presenter and Judge; Season 1

Awards and nominations

Award Year Category Work Result Ref.
Kids' Choice Awards 2021 Favorite Male Social Star Himself Won [86]
People's Choice Awards 2018 Beauty Influencer Won [87]
2019 Nominated [88]
2020 Won [89]
Shorty Awards 2017 Breakout YouTuber Won [90]
2019 YouTuber of the Year Nominated [91]
Streamy Awards 2018 Beauty Won [92]
2019 Nominated [93]
2020 Won [94][23]
Creator of the Year Nominated
Show of the Year Instant Influencer Won
Unscripted Series Nominated
Branded Content: Video "James Charles Spills the Tea on His Glow" Nominated
Teen Choice Awards 2018 Choice Fashion/Beauty Web Star Himself Won [95]
2019 Nominated [96]

References

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External links