James Cohan Gallery

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James Cohan Gallery
WTM3 NYU FC 2 0079.jpg
Established 1999
Location 533 29th Street (Chelsea Location) and 291 Grand Street (Lower East Side Location)
Type Art Gallery
Founder James Cohan, Jane Cohan
Website www.jamescohan.com

The James Cohan Gallery is an art gallery in the Chelsea neighborhood of Manhattan, New York, featuring international contemporary art from both established and emerging artists.[1][2] James Cohan's diverse programming includes solo exhibitions of gallery artists and two thematic group exhibitions every year.[3]

Locations[edit]

In the fall of 1999, James Cohan Gallery opened on West 57th Street with an exhibition of work by Gilbert and George. The gallery moved to its present location in Chelsea in 2002 with group show including Fred Tomaselli, Phillip Taaffe and Harry Smith.[4]

It opened a branch in the former French Concession of Shanghai in 2008.[5] In 2015, the gallery opened a third branch, on the Lower East Side of Manhattan.[6]

Artists[edit]

The gallery represents a diverse group of international artists including:

Helene Appel,[7] Folkert de Jong,[8] Simon Evans,[9][10] Omer Fast,[11] Spencer Finch,[12] Michelle Grabner,[13] Trenton Doyle Hancock,[14] Philip Hanson,[15] Yun-Fei Ji,[16] Jesper Just,[17] Byron Kim,[18] Mernet Larsen,[19] Richard Long,[20] Beatriz Milhazes,[21] Lee Mullican,[22] Scott Olson,[23] Katie Paterson,[24] The Propeller Group,[25] Hiraki Sawa,[26] Shi Zhiying,[27] Yinka Shonibare MBE,[28] Elias Sime,[29] Robert Smithson,[30] Tabaimo,[31] Alison Elizabeth Taylor,[32] Fred Tomaselli,[33] Bill Viola,[34] and Xu Zhen.[35]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "James Cohan | Artists, Art for Sale, and Contact Info | Artsy". www.artsy.net. Retrieved 2017-01-13. 
  2. ^ "Robert Smithson". www.robertsmithson.com. Retrieved 2017-01-13. 
  3. ^ Basel, Art. "Gallery (2015)". Art Basel. Retrieved 2017-01-18. 
  4. ^ Basel, Art. "Gallery (2015)". Art Basel. Retrieved 2017-01-18. 
  5. ^ Tinari, Philip (July 18, 2008). "Shanghai Express". Retrieved July 18, 2008. 
  6. ^ Sheets, Hilarie M. (July 30, 2015). "James Cohan Gallery Expands to Lower East Side". The New York Times. Retrieved 21 July 2016. 
  7. ^ "Helene Appel". Art in America. Retrieved January 12, 2017. 
  8. ^ Tomeo, Michael (May 5, 2011). "Daily Serving: An Interview with Folkert de Jong". Daily Serving. Retrieved January 12, 2017. 
  9. ^ "Simon Evans: Letter to the Future". Artsy. Retrieved January 13, 2017. 
  10. ^ "James Cohan at Frieze New York 2016 | James Cohan | Artsy". www.artsy.net. Retrieved 2017-01-13. 
  11. ^ "At a Safe Remove: Omer Fast at James Cohan". artcritical. 2016-04-26. Retrieved 2017-01-13. 
  12. ^ "Spencer Finch: My Business is Circumference". Artsy. Retrieved January 12, 2017. 
  13. ^ Fyfe, Joe (November 1, 2014). "The Uses of Pleasure: Michelle Grabner at James Cohan". Hyperallergic. Retrieved January 12, 2017. 
  14. ^ "Trenton Doyle Hancock at James Cohan". Contemporary Art Daily. December 31, 2008. Retrieved January 12, 2017. 
  15. ^ Johnson, Ken (March 24, 2016). "Philip Hanson's Poetic Fragments, A Trippy Synthesis of Visual and Verbal". New York Times. Retrieved January 13, 2017. 
  16. ^ Spears, Dorothy (February 17, 2010). "Part Traditionalist, Part Naturalist, Part Dissident". The New York Times. Retrieved January 17, 2017. 
  17. ^ "View of the Exhibition this Nameless Spectacle at James Cohan Gallery". Galerie Perrotin. Retrieved January 13, 2017. 
  18. ^ Mason, Isabella (December 8, 1016). "Byron Kim's Mud Roof Ochre Leaf Star at James Cohan". Blouin Art Info. Bloin Art Info Corp. Retrieved January 13, 2017. 
  19. ^ "James Cohan Gallery Now Represents Mernet Larsen | ARTnews". www.artnews.com. Retrieved 2017-01-13. 
  20. ^ "Richard Long | Hong Kong Circle (2015) | Available for Sale | Artsy". www.artsy.net. Retrieved 2017-01-13. 
  21. ^ "Beatriz Milhazes at James Cohan (Contemporary Art Daily)". www.contemporaryartdaily.com. Retrieved 2017-01-13. 
  22. ^ "'Estate of Lee Mullican' at James Cohan, NY | Artinfo". Artinfo. Retrieved 2017-01-13. 
  23. ^ "James Cohan at Frieze New York 2016 | James Cohan | Artsy". www.artsy.net. Retrieved 2017-01-13. 
  24. ^ "Katie Paterson, exhibitions". www.katiepaterson.org. Retrieved 2017-01-13. 
  25. ^ Rose, Frank (2016-04-21). "The Propeller Group Brings a Phantasmagorical Vietnam to James Cohan". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2017-01-13. 
  26. ^ "Hiraki Sawa at James Cohan Gallery | Artinfo". Artinfo. 2007-09-11. Retrieved 2017-01-13. 
  27. ^ "Shi Zhiying: The Relics". Asia Art Archive in America. 2013-06-13. Retrieved 2017-01-13. 
  28. ^ "YINKA SHONIBARE MBE: Rage of the Ballet Gods | James Cohan | Artsy". www.artsy.net. Retrieved 2017-01-13. 
  29. ^ "Elias Sime | James Cohan | Artsy". www.artsy.net. Retrieved 2017-01-13. 
  30. ^ "Robert Smithson". www.robertsmithson.com. Retrieved 2017-01-13. 
  31. ^ Kino, Carol (2011-10-13). "Tabaimo Video Show at James Cohan Gallery". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2017-01-13. 
  32. ^ "Alison Elizabeth Taylor: Surface Tension at James Cohan Gallery". www.galleriesnow.net. Retrieved 2017-01-13. 
  33. ^ "Fred Tomaselli: Early Work or How I Became A Painter | James Cohan | Artsy". www.artsy.net. Retrieved 2017-01-13. 
  34. ^ "Bill Viola at James Cohan New York - Artmap.com". artmap.com. Retrieved 2017-01-13. 
  35. ^ "Xu Zhen at James Cohan (Contemporary Art Daily)". www.contemporaryartdaily.com. Retrieved 2017-01-13. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 40°45′1.07″N 74°0′14.93″W / 40.7502972°N 74.0041472°W / 40.7502972; -74.0041472