James Dyer Ball

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James Dyer Ball (1847–1919) was a sinologist born in Canton. He served in the Hong Kong Civil Service for 35 years, where he held various positions as security officer and chief interpreter. He died in 1919 in Enfield, Middlesex, England.[1]

Publications[edit]

Dyer Ball Things Chinese-001-001.jpg

He authored many books, including

  • Cantonese Made Easy: A Book of Simple Sentences in the Cantonese Dialect, with Free and Literal Translations, and Directions for the Rendering of English Grammatical Forms in Chinese (1883)[2]
  • The Tung-Kwún Dialect: A Comparative Syllabary of the Tung-Kwún and Cantonese Pronunciations, with Observations of the Variations in the Use of the Classifiers, Finals, and Other Words, and a Description of the Tones (1890)
  • Things Chinese: Being Notes on Various Subjects Connected with China (1891)[3] [1]
  • Easy Sentences in the Hakka: With a Vocabulary (Kelly & Walsh, 1896)
  • Macao, the Holy City: The Gem of the Orient Earth (The China Baptist Publication Society, 1905)
  • The Pith of the Classics: The Chinese Classics in Everyday Life (Noronha & Co, 1905)
  • Five Thousand Years of John Chinaman (Kelly & Walsh, 1906)
  • Rhythms and Rhymes in Chinese Climes: A Lecture on Chinese Poetry and Poets (Kelly & Walsh, 1907)
  • A History of Union Church (with Rev. G. H. Bondfield)
  • The Chinese at Home, or the Man of Tong and His Land
  • The Celestial and His Religions, Or, the Religious Aspect in China; Being a Series of Lectures on the Religions of the Chinese
  • Early Russian Intercourse with China
  • An English-Cantonese Pocket Vocabulary
  • The English-Chinese Cookery Book
  • The Höng Shán Or Macao Dialect: A Comparative Syllabary of the Höng Shán and Cantonese Pronunciations, with Observations on the Variations in the Use of the Classifiers, Finals and Other Words, and a Description of the Tones
  • How to Speak Cantonese: Fifty Conversations in Cantonese Colloquial, with the Chinese Character, Free and Literal English Translations, and Romanised Spelling
  • How to write Chinese, Containing General Rules for Writing the Language with Particular Directions for Writing the Radicals
  • How to Write the Radicals
  • Is Buddhism a Preparation Or a Hindrance to Christianity in China?
  • Papers on China
  • The San-Wúí Dialect
  • The Shun-Tak Dialect
  • A Small English-Cantonese, Cantonese-English Dictionary
  • Readings in Cantonese Colloquial: Being Selections from Books in the Cantonese Vernacular with Free and Literal Translations of the Chinese Character and Romanized Spelling

References[edit]

  1. ^ James Dyer Ball, genealogy
  2. ^ Ball, James Dyer (1888). A Book of Simple Sentences in the Cantonese Dialect, with Free and Literal Translations, and Directions for the Rendering of English Grammatical Forms in Chinese (Second ed.). p. IX. Retrieved 8 August 2015. 
  3. ^ Ball, J. Dyer (1900). Things Chinese: Being Notes on Various Subjects Connected with China (Third ed.). Sampson Low, Marston and Company. p. 8. Retrieved 8 August 2015. 

External links[edit]