James Graham-Brown

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James Graham-Brown
Personal information
Full name James Martin Hilary Graham-Brown
Born (1951-07-11) 11 July 1951 (age 65)
Thetford, Norfolk, England
Batting style Right-handed
Bowling style Right-arm medium-pace
Relations Lionel Blaxland (great-uncle)
Annie Hemingway (daughter)
Domestic team information
Years Team
1974–1976 Kent
1977–1978 Derbyshire
1981–1984 Cornwall
1989–1991 Dorset
Career statistics
Competition FC List A
Matches 30 27
Runs scored 368 227
Batting average 12.26 13.35
100s/50s 0/0 0/1
Top score 43 58
Balls bowled 1340 486
Wickets 12 11
Bowling average 58.00 34.00
5 wickets in innings 0 0
10 wickets in match 0 0
Best bowling 2/23 3/4
Catches/stumpings 8/– 6/–
Source: Cricinfo, 15 November 2016

James Martin Hilary Graham-Brown (born 11 July 1951) is a former English cricketer and schoolteacher. He is now a playwright who writes under the nom de plume Dougie Blaxland.

Early life and education[edit]

Graham-Brown was born at Thetford, Norfolk, the son of Lewis Graham-Brown and his wife Elizabeth Blaxland. He attended Sevenoaks School in Kent, playing in the First XI for several years and as captain in 1970, when he scored 403 runs at an average of 40.30 and took 45 wickets at 8.60.[1] He went on to the University of Kent, where he obtained a First Class Honours degree in English Literature, and then to Bristol University, where he obtained a Master's degree in Philosophy.[2]

Cricket career[edit]

Graham-Brown was a right-handed batsman and a right-arm medium-pace bowler who played for Kent, Derbyshire, Cornwall and Dorset between 1974 and 1991.

He started playing for Kent Second XI in 1972, and made his County Championship debut for the club in 1974. Bowling at a steady pace, he played in seven matches that season. He was also an effective bowler in one-day matches. On 1 September, playing against Lancashire in the John Player League, he took 3 for 4 off five overs and Kent won narrowly;[3] six days later, also against Lancashire, in the final of the Gillette Cup, he took 2 for 15 off 12 overs, and Kent won again.[4] However, he played only one first-class match and one List A match in 1975.

After five first-class and three List A games in the 1976 season, in which Kent finished in fourteenth place in the County Championship, Graham-Brown moved to Derbyshire for the 1977 season. His two years there were erratic, but after a healthy stint in the first team he gave up the first-class game in 1978. He took to Minor Counties Cricket in 1981, playing for Cornwall until 1984, and for Dorset from 1989 to 1991.

Graham-Brown's great-uncle, Lionel Blaxland, played first-class cricket for Derbyshire, primarily between 1932 and 1935.

Later career[edit]

He became a schoolteacher. He was Head of Truro High School for eight years[2] before taking up the position of headmaster of the independent girls' school, the Royal High School, Bath, on Lansdown in Bath. In December 2009, after 11 years in the position, he retired.[5]

He writes plays under the nom de plume of Dougie Blaxland. His one-man play When the Eye Has Gone, about the life and death of Colin Milburn, was performed around England in late 2016.[6]

Plays[edit]

Dougie Blaxland's plays, with date of first performance:

  • Leaving Samson (1997)
  • Marital Moments (2002)
  • Moving In and Taking Over (2004)
  • Going Down (2005)
  • Crisis (2006)
  • A Degree of Compulsion (2006)
  • Hatching Vain Empires (2006)
  • Hitching Rides Home (2006)
  • A Hostage Close to Home (2006)
  • A Public Kind Of Privacy (2006)[7]
  • Redeeming Lizzie Reeve (2006)
  • Speaking Ill Of the Dead (2006)
  • Chauntecleer and Pertelotte (2007)[8]
  • Getting Scrap Value (2007)
  • The Wild Woods (2008)
  • That Moment (2008)
  • You'll Never Guess What? (2008)
  • If I Were a Carpenter (2010)
  • Never Any Fruit (2010)
  • Biggles Flies a Fokker Home (2011)[9]
  • Machamlear (2011)[10]
  • The Tamworth Two (2011)[11]
  • Bursary Boy (2012)
  • A Christmas Carol: The Musical (2012)[12]
  • Jane Eyre: An Autobiography (2013)[13]
  • The King of the Choughs (2014)[14]
  • Wuthering Heights (2014)
  • Hands Up for Jonny Wilkinson's Right Boot (2015)[15]
  • When the Eye Has Gone (2016)[16]

Personal life[edit]

He lost the sight of one eye in 2013.[17] His daughter, Annie Hemingway, is an actress.[18][19]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wisden 1971, p. 834.
  2. ^ a b "After Dinner Speaker: James Graham-Brown". Quality Entertainments. Retrieved 15 November 2016. 
  3. ^ "Lancashire v Kent, John Player League, 1974". CricketArchive. Retrieved 26 November 2016. 
  4. ^ "Kent v Lancashire, Gillette Cup, 1974". CricketArchive. Retrieved 26 November 2016. 
  5. ^ http://www.bathchronicle.co.uk/s-11-male-head/story-11354061-detail/story.html
  6. ^ Hopps, David. "Belly laughs and sadness". Cricinfo. Retrieved 15 November 2016. 
  7. ^ "First Draft Theatre Company Presents 'A Public Kind of Privacy'". First Draft Theatre. Retrieved 19 November 2016. 
  8. ^ "Chauntecleer and Pertelotte". TimeOut. Retrieved 19 November 2016. 
  9. ^ Gordon, Sue. "Biggles Flies A Fokker Home". British Theatre Guide. Retrieved 19 November 2016. 
  10. ^ "Richard III, Boxed Romeo and Juliet, The Incubator...". UKViews. Retrieved 19 November 2016. 
  11. ^ "Tamworth 2 now stars of a new play". Bath Chronicle. 21 April 2011. Retrieved 18 November 2016. 
  12. ^ "A Christmas Carol The Musical (review)". British Theatre Guide. Retrieved 19 November 2016. 
  13. ^ Franks, Paul. "Jane Eyre: An Autobiography (review)". janeeyreanautobiography. Retrieved 19 November 2016. 
  14. ^ "The King Of The Choughs – Review". The Minack Theatre. Retrieved 19 November 2016. 
  15. ^ "A play for the Rugby World Cup 2015". Everyman Theatre. Retrieved 19 November 2016. 
  16. ^ "When The Eye Has Gone (review)". Everyman Theatre. Retrieved 19 November 2016. 
  17. ^ "Colin Milburn Play: When the Eye Has Gone". AllOutCricket.com. Retrieved 15 November 2016. 
  18. ^ http://shanemorgan.wordpress.com/2013/06/20/24-hour-plays-profile-writer-dougie-blaxland/
  19. ^ http://www.bathchronicle.co.uk/Blinded-Bath-writer-James-Graham-Brown-stages/story-19979643-detail/story.html

External links[edit]