James Harvey Young

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James Harvey Young
Born (1915-09-08)September 8, 1915
Brooklyn, New York
Died July 29, 2006(2006-07-29) (aged 90)
Occupation Professor, social historian

James Harvey Young (September 8, 1915 – July 29, 2006) was social historian most well known as an expert on the history of medical frauds and quackery.[1][2][3]

Young was born in Brooklyn, New York. He received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Illinois. From 1941 he worked as a Professor of history at Emory University.[4]

His The Medical Messiahs: A Social History of Health Quackery in Twentieth-Century America (1967) was a scholarly volume that documented many of the medical frauds in the United States.[5][6]

Publications[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Harden, Victoria A. (2007). "James Harvey Young (1915-2006)". American Historical Association.
  2. ^ Pearce, Jeremy. (2006). "James Harvey Young, 90, Dies; Wrote on Medical Quackery". The New York Times.
  3. ^ Marcus, Donald M. (2008). James Harvey Young, PhD (1915-2006), Historian of Medical Quackery. Pharos Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Med Soc. 71(3): 16-21.
  4. ^ "James Harvey Young". Emory University Newsletter.
  5. ^ Cope, Zachary. (1968). Quacks In The U.S.A. British Medical Journal. Vol. 3, No. 5609. p. 43
  6. ^ Anderson, Oscar E. (1968). The Medical Messiahs: A Social History of Health Quackery in Twentieth-Century America by James Harvey Young. The American Historical Review. Vol. 73, No. 5, p. 1665.